Chiropractic Care in Sullivan's Island, SC

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If you are always in pain and have given up on your doctor's suggested therapies, we've got great news - a permanent solution to your back and foot pain may be closer than you might think.

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At Sullivan's Island Spine & Disc Center, our doctors are not just experts. They're people, too, and understand how pain and back problems can be crippling. Our goal is to get you well as soon as possible, without drugs or surgeries. That way, you can get back to a normal, healthy living for years to come.

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If you find yourself in a situation where you need to see a chiropractor as soon as possible, we're here for you. Our chiropractors have treated thousands of patients, and we can treat you too.

Our office offers a robust range of chiropractic services in Sullivan's Island, from custom shoe insoles for your feet to adjustments and massages for your back.

Sullivan's Island Spine & Disc Center: Treating More Than Symptoms

Are you looking for a chiropractor in Sullivan's Island, SC who treats more than just symptoms? If you're sick of chiropractic services that aren't tailored to your needs and body, it's time to make a change. Our expert chiropractors at Sullivan's Island Spine & Disc Center focus on your needs, not an idealized version of you. From chiropractic adjustments to custom shoe inserts and spinal decompression, we have the services and treatments you need to live life to the fullest.

Ready to live your best life free of pain? Contact our office today or explore our site to learn more about the Sullivan's Island Spine & Disc Center difference. We want you to feel comfortable knowing that you will be treated with care, compassion, and excellence every time you visit our office.

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Fourth of July at Lowcountry beach communities: What to know

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — The Fourth of July is expected to be a busy time for popular beach communities in the Lowcountry!Visitors from near and far are expected to travel to areas like Folly Beach, Isle of Palms and Sullivan's Island to soak up the sun, relax in the sand and take in the holiday's festivities.Below you can find special information on the three areas for Independence Day Weekend, as well as links to other helpful tips for visiting the beach this summer!...

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — The Fourth of July is expected to be a busy time for popular beach communities in the Lowcountry!

Visitors from near and far are expected to travel to areas like Folly Beach, Isle of Palms and Sullivan's Island to soak up the sun, relax in the sand and take in the holiday's festivities.

Below you can find special information on the three areas for Independence Day Weekend, as well as links to other helpful tips for visiting the beach this summer!

A fireworks display is being planned by the Folly Association of Business for Monday, July 4.

The show will begin at sundown and should be visible from anywhere in the community.

The pyrotechnics will be launched from 3rd Block West, with the parking and beach areas here closed from 10 a.m. until 11 p.m.

Visitors of all ages are invited to attend.

The Folly Association of Business will conduct a beach sweep right after the display, as well as the following morning, to clean up any debris or trash from the event.

A golf cart parade will take place on Isle of Palms at 10 a.m. on Monday, July 4, with staging of the carts scheduled for 9 a.m. at 4th Avenue and Charleston Boulevard.

Golf cart operators are reminded that they must have valid driver's license, a permit from the South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles and proof of insurance. Carts may be operated along a secondary highway or street within four miles of wherever the vehicle is registered, or from the ingress/regress of a gated community where the cart is registered. Golf carts may only be operated during daylight hours.

The City of Isle of Palms has a fireworks show planned for 9 p.m. that same night in the Front Beach area.

The show, sponsored by the city, will result in the closure of the beach between 21st Avenue to 13th Avenue at Sea Cabins starting around 6 p.m. so organizers can set up for the event. Visitors will be allowed to stay inside the Isle of Palms County Park area or behind the restrooms to view the show.

Officials are reminding residents and visitors that all other fireworks are strictly prohibited in the city.

City officials said there will be extra personnel over the weekend in anticipation of "a significant influx" of visitors.

A golf cart and bike parade will kick off the holiday on Sullivan's Island, with the event beginning at Sunrise Presbyterian Church and ending at Sullivan’s Island Elementary School. Those interested in participating in the competition must register at Town Hall through July 1. A limited number of registrations will be available at the starting line until 8:30 a.m. on the Fourth of July itself.

Those who do not register can join the parade after the registrants, but will not be considered in the judging.

Festivities will follow the parade and refreshments will be served while the winners receive their ribbons.

The town's Independence Day party at the park and fireworks will also return after a multi-year absence.

Attendees can gather starting at 5:30 p.m. and should bring a chair or a blanket. The Shem Creek Boogie Band will play music, and fireworks will start around 9 p.m. During the event, dogs will not be allowed in the park, and alcohol is prohibited.

Outside of the town's display, fireworks are not allowed on Sullivan's Island. Extra officers will be assisting with traffic and law enforcement throughout the weekend. Residents and visitors are encouraged to bike or walk to events.

Charleston-based restaurant expanding to the Queen City

The Co-Op will be on West Tremont Avenue in the South End neighborhood, near Hi-Wire Brewing and SPENGA.CHARLESTON, S.C. — Charleston-based restaurant The Co-Op is expanding to Charlotte and opening its doors in July.This will be its first North Carolina location. The Co-Op has multiple locations in South Carolina and has started an expansion to Tennessee.Patrons will be...

The Co-Op will be on West Tremont Avenue in the South End neighborhood, near Hi-Wire Brewing and SPENGA.

CHARLESTON, S.C. — Charleston-based restaurant The Co-Op is expanding to Charlotte and opening its doors in July.

This will be its first North Carolina location. The Co-Op has multiple locations in South Carolina and has started an expansion to Tennessee.

Patrons will be able to enjoy the eatery's signature drink -- frosé, or frozen rosé -- along with breakfast and lunch sandwiches, salads, and coffee.

The eatery has won awards for Best Frozen Drinks, Best Sullivan's Island Happy Hour, and Best Isle of Palms Restaurant.

"We're thrilled to bring The Co-Op to North Carolina and have more people enjoy our specialty sandwiches and of course our frosé," The Co-Op owner and founder Jess Patterson said.

"Charlotte is an amazing city with so much to offer, and we couldn't be more excited to be a part of its lively hospitality scene," Patterson said. "We foresee a lot of frosé and laid back beach vibes in the Queen City's future!"

The Co-Op Charlotte will be open seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Opening date to come.

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Three Summer Cocktails to Sip

Mex 1 Coastal Cantina is a Baja-inspired beach bar with locations in Sullivan's Island, West Ashley and Mount Pleasant and prides itself on providing an endless summer to customers year-round with craveable tacos and memorable margaritas.The restaurant’s main inspiration came from their surf trips down the Baja Peninsula, cruising down the Mex 1 highway, stopping along the way for light, fresh flavors at local cantinas....

Mex 1 Coastal Cantina is a Baja-inspired beach bar with locations in Sullivan's Island, West Ashley and Mount Pleasant and prides itself on providing an endless summer to customers year-round with craveable tacos and memorable margaritas.

The restaurant’s main inspiration came from their surf trips down the Baja Peninsula, cruising down the Mex 1 highway, stopping along the way for light, fresh flavors at local cantinas.

As one of the top Mexican and Tex-Mex restaurants in the area, the food at Mex 1 is inspired by the flavors of Southern California and the Baja Peninsula. Their fan-favorite Baja fish tacos, Mahi-Mahi rice bowls, guacamole, and smoked pulled pork nachos are among their most mouth-watering dishes, bringing Charleston locals and summer tourists back for more (and more).

In addition to Mex 1’s locally sourced, high-quality food; their delicious summertime cocktails provide the perfect escape from the daily grind of life.

Mex 1’s cocktails are made with only 100% agave tequila, setting them apart from the other margaritas in town. This purest form of tequila means no hangovers, no additives, and a much more enjoyable cocktail experience.

Whether you’re sipping at the shoreline or enjoying beverages at home with friends, Morgan Hurley, Marketing and Beverage Director at Mex 1 Coastal Cantina, provides his list of the top 3 summer cocktails that everyone should try over the next few months.

Top 3 summertime cocktails:

1. Ranch Water Cocktail

This effervescent cocktail is typically made with Topo Chico sparkling mineral water, tequila, and lime. This beverage can be easily crafted at home and brought to enjoy on boat excursions or pool days. You can even enjoy it in the Topo Chico bottle if you gently pop the top off and just add tequila and lime juice.

Mex 1’s version of the ranch water comes with its own twist as a Pineapple Ranch Water made with pineapple infused tequila, Topo Chico sparkling mineral water, a slice of lime and a lime sugar/salt rim; served right in the Topo Chico bottle. Try it with Mex 1’s Bangin’ Shrimp Tacos for a full summertime Baja experience.

Hurley says, “Serving the cocktail in the Topo Chico bottles adds a bit more mineral water. This makes for a much lighter drink so you can enjoy a few on a hot summer day.”

2. Watermelon Margarita

Watermelon margaritas are an in-season summertime staple with watermelon, tequila, lime, and agave. These cocktails are perfect for batching ahead of time for parties. Hurley says, “Batching watermelon margaritas takes the work out of summertime. Just set it and forget it before enjoying a pitcher of margs by the pool.”

Mex 1’s variation of a watermelon margarita is their award-winning Baja Tanga. Their blend of tequila, lime, agave, watermelon and rosé wine creates the light, refreshing beverage that won first place at the Charleston Margarita Festival. Sip on this drink while enjoying smoked pulled pork nachos for a perfect combination of sweet and savory.

Want to enjoy a few watermelon margs at home without mixing them up yourself? This margarita is also sold seasonally as a mix, so customers can pick up a bottle from Mex 1, bring it home, and just add tequila.

3. Classic Margarita

You can’t go wrong with tequila, lime and agave. However, if you choose to make your own margaritas at home; Hurley reminds folks to only purchase 100% agave tequila and stick with seasonal tequila preferences.

He says, “If you’re at the store and the bottle doesn’t say 100% agave tequila, put it back on the shelf. Blanco and Reposado tequilas are perfect for summertime, while Anejo tequilas are better enjoyed in the fall and winter.”

All Mex 1’s margaritas are crafted with 100% Agave Tequila and their signature Mex 1 Mix, a blend of fresh lime, lemon, orange juice and a touch of simple syrup. The crowd favorite infused margaritas feature their infused Tequilas made in house with fresh fruit like pineapple, pineapple habanero, strawberry cucumber and jalapeno. The infused Tequilas provide a potent flavor that’s consistent across all margaritas, creating a premium sipping experience.

For a surf-inspired, laid-back beach bar atmosphere, craveable tacos, and memorable margaritas; Mex 1 is your vacation destination for an endless summer.

'Do not rezone that golf course'; citizens say facility needed; change may also threaten airport

Several individuals appeared before Orangeburg County Council requesting a halt to the rezoning of the Holly Hill Golf Club property that would allow the development of a single-family subdivision."I beg you please do the right thing and do not rezone that golf course," Co-chair of Planning and Zoning for Holly Hill Justin VanBogart told Orangeburg County Council during its regularly scheduled June 6 meeting. "It is in the public interest to keep one of the very few recreational things we have in this town."...

Several individuals appeared before Orangeburg County Council requesting a halt to the rezoning of the Holly Hill Golf Club property that would allow the development of a single-family subdivision.

"I beg you please do the right thing and do not rezone that golf course," Co-chair of Planning and Zoning for Holly Hill Justin VanBogart told Orangeburg County Council during its regularly scheduled June 6 meeting. "It is in the public interest to keep one of the very few recreational things we have in this town."

Council was scheduled to give second reading to rezone the golf club property from forest agriculture to residential general.

American Star Development SC, LLC of Sullivan's Island has requested the two parcels making up the Holly Hill Golf Club at 9159 Old State Road be rezoned.

The parcels are a combined 93.59 acres. The property is about one mile southeast of the Town of Holly Hill.

ASC has said the company has no specific plans for the property at the moment. It is exploring zoning opportunities to better determine future development plans.

County planning officials say the owner has expressed his intentions to close the golf course.

Several attempts to reach the owner of the property, as listed on the rezoning application, have been unsuccessful.

County attorney D'Anne Haydel said the South Carolina Aeronautics Commission notified the county it has two objections with rezoning the property, specially due to safety and noise concerns.

Haydel noted the SCAC is a governmental entity and needs a hearing.

"There is a statute that indicates we need to get back with the Aeronautics Commission within 30 days with a line-by-line response to why it is safe and why it won't be noisy," Haydel said.

In light of the new information, council unanimously voted to table the matter and to send it back to the County Planning Commission for further study on the SCAC concerns.

Prior to the council's vote, VanBogart noted with the number of housing developments planned -- the town is going to grow from 700 homes to 3,000 homes in the next two years -- there will be a need to have recreational opportunities for residents coming into the area.

"We want to keep our golf course," VanBogart said. "It is very much integral to our town."

VanBogart said while the town owned the golf course for years, it has been sold to a private developer who has "plans to tear it (golf course) down and make it homes."

"I am all about private property rights," VanBogart said, but noted there has not been full disclosure from the property's ownership about intentions for the property. "We were all caught completely blindsided."

John Hill, speaking on behalf of his son, John Paul, who keeps a plane at the airport, says the airport is a "gem."

"I think there is hardly any left in South Carolina that are a grass strip and private," Hill said. "This is going back to the past in America when pilots flew out of grass strips."

Hill said the airport is a great educational tool for young generations and has flight opportunities for school-aged children as well as instruction on airplane mechanics as part of the national Experimental Aircraft Association.

"It is a page of history that is going to disappear," Hill said. "I think it is a unique distinction. That airport can lead to so many things."

Robert Gootman also expressed his support of the Holly Hill Airport.

"There are too many airports that close and Holly Hill has a very unique asset in that airport and it will grow along with the community," Gootman said, noting the airport can be used in cases of emergency, training of pilots and recreational uses. "If that golf course turns into a housing development, that airport will be shut down. It will be too dangerous to land airplanes there because you will have houses right there in front of the flight path."

Ken Mackey also has an airplane at the Holly Hill airport.

"It will close the airport," Mackey said. "You can't have airplanes coming 200 feet over the house."

Mackey said subdivisions alongside the airport are possible.

He has contacted the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association national group, which is putting a package together to possibly turn the airport into an air park where houses alongside the airport have hangars.

"There are no hangars available from Holly Hill to the coast to hangar your aircraft," Mackey said. "There is demand there for this type of development ... and keep the asset as an airport."

Dominion Energy lists Sullivan’s Island Sand Dunes Club for sale with $19M offer in hand

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was us...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.

The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.

With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was used for decades as a corporate retreat, by island residents and rented out for events and meetings. Dominion Energy acquired the property when it bought SCE&G.

The energy company sought the state Public Service Commission’s permission to sell the property for $19 million to a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital called SDCC Island Resident Club. In February the commission instead required Dominion list the property for sale and solicit bids.

“This simply means that Dominion Energy will need to determine whether other potential buyers exist,” said Rhonda Maree O’Banion, Dominion’s media relations manager.

“After the competitive bidding process is complete, Dominion Energy will report back to the commission and if necessary, update its request for approval to sell the Sand Dunes property,” she added.

The sale to Navarro’s company has been anticipated on Sullivan’s Island, a barrier island with fewer than 2,000 residents where the average home sale price in 2021 was nearly $3.2 million according to the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors.

One year ago the town signed an agreement with Navarro’s company that laid out plans to potentially renovate the club and operate it for island residents.

Beemok, the February 2021 agreement says, “desires to purchase the property from its current owner, renovate the clubhouse and operate the club.”

The agreement also says “the town believes a club with membership limited to town residents and property owners” would be desirable if the club were sold.

“That’s what we were expecting was going to happen,” Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil said. “Mr. Navarro and his group have worked closely with the town.”

The agreement is non-exclusive and the same conditions apply to the property regardless of who were to buy it, he said.

The agreement says the price of membership in the club would not exceed the cost of operating the club, and the town would get to review confidential financial statements to ensure that provision.

Residents and town property owners could become members, and nonmembers could still use the pool for a fee comparable to what municipal recreation departments charge in Mount Pleasant or on Isle of Palms, the agreement says.

The address is considered a large property that’s most valuable as a potential site for new homes according to an appraisal submitted by Dominion, but the clubhouse is protected as an historic structure and could not be demolished without the town’s permission.

The property would not be the first iconic Charleston-area locale purchased by Navarro’s companies if his bid is successful. His companies own the Charleston Place hotel, purchased last year for $350 million, and the Credit One Bank Stadium on Daniel Island.

Efforts to reach representatives of Beemok Capital and the company’s public relations firm by phone and email were unsuccessful Friday.

The sale of the property would not change Dominion Energy’s utility rates or pricing according to the company’s Public Service Commission filing.

In 2021 Dominion turned over more than 2,900 acres of property as part of a $165 million tax settlement with the S.C. Department of Revenue, resolving a three-year dispute over taxes owed on parts and materials purchased to build the V.C. Summer nuclear plant, which was not completed. The Sand Dunes Club was not a part of that deal, but other former clubs and retreats in Aiken, Lexington and Georgetown counties were, and some of those will be added to the state’s park system.

Brian Symmes, spokesman for Gov. Henry McMaster’s office, said the state had been interested in the Sand Dunes Club property, but the cost was too high.

“There was interest in it being part of the settlement agreement, but at the end of the day it was just much too expensive,” he said.

The more than 2,900 acres South Carolina acquired, which included the Pine Island Club on Lake Murray, cost the state about $50 million — the amount Dominion’s tax debt was reduced in exchange for those properties. The Sand Dunes Club property, less than 4 acres, would presumably have cost at least the $19 million Beemok Capital has offered, and make for an unusually expensive park purchase.

The tax settlement was a part of the relief provided to ratepayers, shareholders and governments who sued after Dominion’s predecessor SCE&G abruptly ended construction at the V.C. Summer site in 2017.

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