Chiropractic Care in Sullivan's Island, SC

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At Sullivan's Island Spine & Disc Center, we offer our valued clients a wide range of chiropractic services that solve serious symptoms like:

Chiropractic Care Sullivan's Island, SC

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Chiropractic Care Sullivan's Island, SC

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Chiropractic Care Sullivan's Island, SC843-832-4499

If you are always in pain and have given up on your doctor's suggested therapies, we've got great news - a permanent solution to your back and foot pain may be closer than you might think.

As doctors and specialists, we hold true to our core values:

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We want you to feel comfortable knowing that from your first visit, you will be treated with the care and compassion you would expect from a team of professionals.

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At Sullivan's Island Spine & Disc Center, our doctors are not just experts. They're people, too, and understand how pain and back problems can be crippling. Our goal is to get you well as soon as possible, without drugs or surgeries. That way, you can get back to a normal, healthy living for years to come.

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We pair cutting-edge technology with advanced chiropractic services like spinal decompression to get your life back on track.

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If you find yourself in a situation where you need to see a chiropractor as soon as possible, we're here for you. Our chiropractors have treated thousands of patients, and we can treat you too.

Our office offers a robust range of chiropractic services in Sullivan's Island, from custom shoe insoles for your feet to adjustments and massages for your back.

Sullivan's Island Spine & Disc Center: Treating More Than Symptoms

Are you looking for a chiropractor in Sullivan's Island, SC who treats more than just symptoms? If you're sick of chiropractic services that aren't tailored to your needs and body, it's time to make a change. Our expert chiropractors at Sullivan's Island Spine & Disc Center focus on your needs, not an idealized version of you. From chiropractic adjustments to custom shoe inserts and spinal decompression, we have the services and treatments you need to live life to the fullest.

Ready to live your best life free of pain? Contact our office today or explore our site to learn more about the Sullivan's Island Spine & Disc Center difference. We want you to feel comfortable knowing that you will be treated with care, compassion, and excellence every time you visit our office.

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Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

How did SC get the Palmetto State nickname? It wasn’t just because there’s lots of palmetto trees

Ever wonder how South Carolina came to be nicknamed the Palmetto State?While, yes, the state does have many palmetto trees scattered around the entirety of the state due to its large species population within the borders of South Carolina, this tree also has a historical significance to the state.The nickname is derived from South Carolina’s state tree, the sabal palmetto.Also called the cabbage palmetto, s...

Ever wonder how South Carolina came to be nicknamed the Palmetto State?

While, yes, the state does have many palmetto trees scattered around the entirety of the state due to its large species population within the borders of South Carolina, this tree also has a historical significance to the state.

The nickname is derived from South Carolina’s state tree, the sabal palmetto.

Also called the cabbage palmetto, sabal palm, inodes palmetto and the Carolina palmetto, the sabal palmetto was designated as the official state tree by Joint Resolution Number 63 all the way back on March 17, 1939.

This palmetto tree was symbolic toward the defeat of the British fleet at Fort Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island during the Battle of Sullivan’s Island. This was due to the fact that the fort was built from palmetto logs, which absorbed the impact of the cannon balls and would not shatter.

Hence, South Carolina earned its nickname: the Palmetto State.

The Battle of Sullivan’s Island was the first decisive American victory over the British Royal Navy during the Revolutionary War and took place on June 28, 1776.

“The ferocity of the British naval bombardment had no great effect on the fort. Sabal palmetto trunks embedded in deep sand proved pliable and sturdy enough, absorbing iron balls like a sponge,” wrote the National Park Service of the battle.

At the time, Charleston residents were unaware if the fort had been victorious against the British or if it had been captured following the Battle of Sullivan’s Island.

The fort’s commander, Colonel William Moultrie, had then sent a boat to inform the residents of the good news. Loud cheers were said to reverberate through the streets.

“The defense had been a major victory for the Americans in Charleston. General Lee wrote, ‘The behavior of the Garrison, both men and officers, with Colonel Moultrie at their head, I confess astonished me.’ Six days later the Declaration of Independence was signed in Philadelphia. Afterwards, the South Carolina General Assembly renamed the fort, Fort Moultrie, in honor of the commander of Fort Sullivan,” wrote the American Battlefield Trust.

As for the palmetto trees themselves, sabal palms are native to the southeastern parts of the country.

“The cabbage palmetto is found in the coastal plain region from North Carolina to Florida. The palm inhabits maritime forests, “islands” within salt and brackish marshes, and the edges of ponds. It is also a commonly planted tree in urban areas throughout South Carolina,” states the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

The palmetto tree can grow to a height of 33 feet tall and its leaves can grow to about 3 feet across. They are formed with a spongier, scattered tissue and more malleable cells than most other trees, which allow them to bend with the wind during major storms such as hurricanes and tropical storms.

In addition to their many other attributes, these trees flower during the month of July and can be quite fragrant, attracting many types of pollinators.

As for size, according to Plant Real Florida, the University of Florida conducted several age and growth rates of sabal palms, the preliminary results indicated that, under average conditions in the wild, these plants can require 10 to 15 years of growth or more from seed to the first sign of a trunk at ground level. After this initial growth spurt, the trunks will grow about 6 inches per year. Meaning, a standing sabal palm with 20 feet of trunk is at least 50 years old.

The palmetto tree can be seen as a figure of significance in nearly every aspect of the state’s inception. It has been adopted as the state’s nickname, is included in the state seal, is on the state flag, is in the Pledge to the Flag of South Carolina, and can be seen in everyday life while carrying on day-to-day activities within the state.

Labor Day crowds return to normal for beach businesses

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) — From the shops to the sand, leaders across the Lowcountry’s beaches said this is the first Labor Day weekend “back to normal” since before the pandemic.Sullivan’s Island mayor Patrick O’Neil said although the threat of rain resulted in a slightly quieter weekend than anticipated, local leaders are happy to see the Labor Day crowds return.“We continue, everyday, just to see exponential growth of the foot traffic that’s coming through,” s...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) — From the shops to the sand, leaders across the Lowcountry’s beaches said this is the first Labor Day weekend “back to normal” since before the pandemic.

Sullivan’s Island mayor Patrick O’Neil said although the threat of rain resulted in a slightly quieter weekend than anticipated, local leaders are happy to see the Labor Day crowds return.

“We continue, everyday, just to see exponential growth of the foot traffic that’s coming through,” said Kathleen Arnold, fine art consultant at Sandpiper Gallery on Sullivan’s Island. “The traffic is constant, back and forth. People walking to the restaurants, people heading to the beach.”

Arnold said in her experience, the tourism season on Sullivan’s Island typically lasts from May until Labor Day weekend every year. However, after seeing tourist travel ebb and flow “practically year-round” in recent years, she expects the season to last through October or November.

“People want to escape the hustle and bustle of life, so they come here,” Arnold said, attributing the steady growth of tourism to Charleston’s “small-town charm.”

Leaders at Folly Beach agree. Mayor Tim Goodwin said stores there are struggling to keep up with an increase of both foot traffic — and car traffic — from tourists and locals this summer.

“Sunday was a pile of people out here,” Goodwin said. “The first time this year we’ve seen traffic backed up as far as it was.”

Goodwin encouraged anyone heading to the water to use the free Beach Reach app. Created by the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments, the app provides live traffic cameras, maps and beach policies for three of Charleston’s most popular beaches.

The mayor said the biggest challenges facing store owners at Folly Beach are a lack of workers and employee burnout. As a result, some stores are struggling to keep their normal hours.

Click here to learn more about the town of Sullivan’s Island.

CORCORAN HM PROPERTIES, AFFILIATE OF THE CORCORAN GROUP, ADDS CHARLESTON TO GROWING OPERATION

NEW YORK, Sept. 15, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Corcoran Group, LLC announced today its affiliate, Corcoran HM Properties, has expanded its growing operation into Charleston, South Carolina. The announcement was made by Corcoran President & CEO Pamela Liebman, and Corcoran HM Properties broker-owner Valerie Mitchener. Corcoran HM Properties' growth marks the eighth Corcoran affiliate to announce an expansion in less than one year.This market expansion, Corcoran HM Properties' first since affiliating with Corcoran in June 2021, is a strat...

NEW YORK, Sept. 15, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Corcoran Group, LLC announced today its affiliate, Corcoran HM Properties, has expanded its growing operation into Charleston, South Carolina. The announcement was made by Corcoran President & CEO Pamela Liebman, and Corcoran HM Properties broker-owner Valerie Mitchener. Corcoran HM Properties' growth marks the eighth Corcoran affiliate to announce an expansion in less than one year.

This market expansion, Corcoran HM Properties' first since affiliating with Corcoran in June 2021, is a strategic step in the firm's growth plan and broadens its reach from the Charlotte, North Carolina region to the greater Charleston area, including Mt. Pleasant, Sullivans Island, Isle of Palms, and more. This growth brings Corcoran HM Properties' agent population to more than 130 affiliated real estate professionals, increasing their agent count by 15% since joining the Corcoran brand.

"As I've said before, our affiliates' milestones are some of proudest moments, and today's news from Corcoran HM Properties is definitely cause for celebration," said Liebman. "Val and her team are incredibly dedicated and I've long admired the focus they have on growing their business and ensuring both their affiliated agents' and clients' satisfaction. This strategic move into Charleston will not only open doors for their team, it's a significant market for the Corcoran® network."

Corcoran HM Properties was founded by Mitchener in 2006, and the locally owned and operated boutique firm quickly grew to be a market leader in the Charlotte metro area. Corcoran HM Properties' notable success and growth to date can be directly attributed to the team's ability to adapt to the ever-evolving needs of Charlotte's high-end real estate market and the elevated education and individualized business guidance they provide their agents. The firm also boasts an in-house relocation department that manages both individual and corporate moves and has been the preferred Realtor® for the NBA's Charlotte Hornets for more than a decade.

"Charleston, South Carolina is known for many things – its history, architecture, and beaches, to name a few – and we've long known that this was a market we wanted to serve," said Mitchener. "The area attracts many second-home buyers for vacation homes or investment properties, so this was a natural fit given the client needs we already serve in Charlotte. I'm thrilled to be entering this next chapter of our growth and am grateful to our agent community in Charleston and all of our current and future clients."

About The Corcoran Group

The Corcoran Group has been a leading residential real estate brand for nearly 50 years. Through its New York City, Hamptons, and South Florida brokerages, along with its rapidly growing affiliate network, the firm is home to more than 170 offices and more than 6,000 independent salespersons in key urban, suburban, and resort markets nationwide. Corcoran agents earn and keep their clients' trust with an unwavering commitment to white-glove service, expertise, and integrity. In every market served, Corcoran helps you find the home that's just right for you. The Corcoran® brand comprises both offices owned by a subsidiary of Anywhere Advisors LLC (f/k/a Realogy Brokerage Group LLC) and franchised offices, which are independently owned and operated. For more information about The Corcoran Group, please visit www.corcoran.com.

SOURCE The Corcoran Group

Sullivan’s Island Town Council Takes Pledge ‘To Be Civil’

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye NewsMembers of the Sullivan’s Island Town Council quickly and unanimously agreed that, despite any differences they might have, they should always maintain “the highest standards of civility, honesty and mutual respect” in both spoken and written communication with one another. They were not nearly as quick to ask town employees and those who volunteer their time to sit on various boards to do the same. With little discussion at its regularly scheduled meeting Aug. 16, the Council ...

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye News

Members of the Sullivan’s Island Town Council quickly and unanimously agreed that, despite any differences they might have, they should always maintain “the highest standards of civility, honesty and mutual respect” in both spoken and written communication with one another. They were not nearly as quick to ask town employees and those who volunteer their time to sit on various boards to do the same. With little discussion at its regularly scheduled meeting Aug. 16, the Council passed a resolution noting that “The elected officials of the Council enact this civility pledge to build a stronger and more prosperous community by advocating for civil engagement, respecting others and their viewpoints and finding solutions for the betterment of the town of Sullivan’s Island.” Mayor Pat O’Neil explained that the resolution emerged from a recent meeting of the Municipal Association of South Carolina, “recognizing what seems to be an epidemic of basically bad behavior in a lot of town governments in a lot of places across the country.” The resolution passed by a 7-0 vote, but a similar resolution aimed at town employees and board members faced tougher sledding. “If somebody is found to have violated this pledge because they had a bad day or something, are they not up for promotion?”

Council Member Greg Hammond asked. “I just don’t want to go into something so quickly that impacts many, many town employees and possibly their livelihood without being a little more clear in terms of if this has teeth or not. I’m not opposed to this, but I’d like to kind of put it out for some public comment and hear what people think about it rather than being, in my opinion, a little hasty.”

Council Member Scott Millimet disagreed, pointing out that the resolution isn’t binding and that it’s simply “a pledge to be civil.” “I’m having trouble understanding where you’re coming from in terms of ‘I really think we need to take a pause and determine whether we want to behave in a civil manner or not,’” Millimet asked Hammond. “It does ask new employees to commit to behaving in a civil manner, and I don’t think anybody should object to that. If so, I’d like to know why.” “We’re not passing a law, rule or anything of the sort,” Council Member Bachman Smith added. “There’s no penalty. In my mind, we are trying to promote a more civil discourse and civil decorum. It would be hard to argue against the idea that at the national level we are seeing something less than civil, and it’s growing increasingly concerning on all sides.”

“I’m happy to lead by example, but the libertarian in me is not in favor of requiring everybody else to take a pledge without having a more thorough discussion over it,” Hammond responded. Council Member Justin Novak suggested that since one of his colleagues had “a significant issue” with the resolution, the Council should consider tabling the resolution, but Hammond insisted on a vote. The resolution passed 5-2, with Hammond and Novak voting no and Gary Visser, Kaye Smith, Millimet, Bachman Smith and O’Neil voting yes.

The resolution pointed out that a national survey found that 93% of Americans think incivility is a problem, while 68% consider it to be a major issue and 74% believe incivility is increasing in the United States. It also stated that “the Town Council recognizes that the town would create an improved, more friendly and efficient workplace if all Town Council members, town employees and town-appointed board members made a commitment to civility by taking the civility pledge.”

College student creates project to support endangered monarch butterflies

SULLIVANS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Monarch butterflies are now on the endangered species list. One college student is trying to raise awareness about the insect through a class project."I see the monarch butterflies as a tool to understand a bigger system at work here," says Avery McMurtry, "Migration" project creator.McMurtry is a senior at Northeastern University in Boston. She was sent home to Sullivan's Island during COVID. That is when inspiration hit."I started walking the beach paths an...

SULLIVANS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Monarch butterflies are now on the endangered species list. One college student is trying to raise awareness about the insect through a class project.

"I see the monarch butterflies as a tool to understand a bigger system at work here," says Avery McMurtry, "Migration" project creator.

McMurtry is a senior at Northeastern University in Boston. She was sent home to Sullivan's Island during COVID. That is when inspiration hit.

"I started walking the beach paths and the path through the Maritime Forest and I was very inspired by that landscape and all the little critters and different plant life that would come seasonally."

A class project turned that into a reality.

"I was actually assigned, for one of my design classes, a project to do a site specific installation. I came up with this idea and for a while I just sat on the idea. I was like, oh, this is actually a cool concept. People seem to respond well to it.”

Her project, which includes an enclosure for the insect, has been a year in the making. She has raised and released about 70 monarch butterflies already, and is raising another 40 right now.

"Then they'll be in their chrysalis for a week and you can find them inside here. Then when they hatch, I release them at the end of the day, so they can go out and continue to live in nature and hopefully repopulate the area."

Her ultimate goals are to show people the natural beauty on the Island and get people intrigued.

"I want people to be more supportive of pollinators and of monarch butterflies and I hope that people see the monarchs and find a sense of wonder and a sense of awe in this weird life cycle they have."

She says the best thing people can do to aid pollinators is plant native flowers or milkweed, the only plant monarch caterpillars can feed on.

"Go ask your garden center, they'll tell you what's native. They'll tell you what bees and butterflies like, then plant as much as you can to increase that biodiversity. When you can find local milkweed, definitely buy it because you will see caterpillars and butterflies on your plants. I promise you they'll find it. They will find it."

The enclosure is open until September 3rd, but McMurtry is looking to extend it further since she is still raising so many caterpillars.

You can visit the enclosure for free. It is located along the tree line of the community garden at the Gadsden Battery Cultural Center.

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