Chiropractic Care in St. George, SC

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If you are always in pain and have given up on your doctor's suggested therapies, we've got great news - a permanent solution to your back and foot pain may be closer than you might think.

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At St. George Spine & Disc Center, our doctors are not just experts. They're people, too, and understand how pain and back problems can be crippling. Our goal is to get you well as soon as possible, without drugs or surgeries. That way, you can get back to a normal, healthy living for years to come.

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If you find yourself in a situation where you need to see a chiropractor as soon as possible, we're here for you. Our chiropractors have treated thousands of patients, and we can treat you too.

Our office offers a robust range of chiropractic services in St. George, from custom shoe insoles for your feet to adjustments and massages for your back.

St. George Spine & Disc Center: Treating More Than Symptoms

Are you looking for a chiropractor in St. George, SC who treats more than just symptoms? If you're sick of chiropractic services that aren't tailored to your needs and body, it's time to make a change. Our expert chiropractors at St. George Spine & Disc Center focus on your needs, not an idealized version of you. From chiropractic adjustments to custom shoe inserts and spinal decompression, we have the services and treatments you need to live life to the fullest.

Ready to live your best life free of pain? Contact our office today or explore our site to learn more about the St. George Spine & Disc Center difference. We want you to feel comfortable knowing that you will be treated with care, compassion, and excellence every time you visit our office.

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Tennessee Football Preview: No. 5 Vols Take on South Carolina in Columbia

The Opponent: The University of South Carolina was founded as South Carolina College in 1801, and functioned mostly as a small liberal arts school for more than fifty years. General Sherman and the Union army spared South Carolina’s campus as they famously sacked the city of Columbia in 1865. In the Reconstruction Era, the school was renamed the University of South Carolina and began to take its current shape. Notable alumni include your run-of-the-mill career politicians and a fair amount of Confederate officers. Sout...

The Opponent: The University of South Carolina was founded as South Carolina College in 1801, and functioned mostly as a small liberal arts school for more than fifty years. General Sherman and the Union army spared South Carolina’s campus as they famously sacked the city of Columbia in 1865. In the Reconstruction Era, the school was renamed the University of South Carolina and began to take its current shape. Notable alumni include your run-of-the-mill career politicians and a fair amount of Confederate officers. South Carolina football does have one thing Tennessee does not, a Heisman trophy winner. George Rogers took it home in 1980. Does Tennessee play it differently around the goal line this week with Hendon Hooker still in contention? This game will be on ESPN, and will go up against a fairly soft primetime slate on the national networks. It is a good opportunity for #5.

Are they any Good? No, I don’t think South Carolina is any good. The Cocks will go bowling again, but absent of an upset win versus Tennessee or Clemson it will be a disappointing season in Columbia. South Carolina has wins against Georgia State, SC Upstate, and Charlotte in its non-conference schedule. In the SEC they have defeated Vanderbilt, Texas A&M and Kentucky with a backup QB. Those teams are 5-15 in conference overall. This is a volatile team. They lead the SEC in turnovers lost for the second straight year, but are also top four in turnovers gained. That means this South Carolina team has been involved in 39 total turnovers this season, by far the most in the conference.

What does Vegas Say? This line opened right around -20.5 and jumped up to -21.5 fairly quickly. It has stayed right there since, effectively making it the same line as Tennessee’s last game versus Missouri. Through seven SEC games, South Carolina has not been involved in one single lead change. That is a crazy stat, so make sure to watch out who scores first.

Matchup on Defense: Bring pressure. South Carolina leads the SEC with 23 total turnovers. This is a team prone to fumbling, and it features a quarterback who does a poor job handling pressure. Spencer Rattler was supposed to be the most transformative transfer quarterback in college football this season. How is that going? Fans calling for a return of Luke Doty under center should tell you all you need to know. Rattler has nine interceptions to just eight touchdowns on the year. Rattler is by no means a stiff, but he is not known as a running quarterback. Still, the Vols should be careful blitzing after letting Brady Cook rush for 106 yards last week.

The risk is worth taking against this Gamecock offense though. South Carolina could benefit from the return of MarShawn Lloyd & Christian Beal-Smith on Saturday. Those guys will certainly help in the run game, but that is a place where Tennessee continues to bottle up opponents. The goal will be to get South Carolina in third & long. To be fair to Spencer Rattler, he is playing behind a pretty poor offensive line. This opportunity has to get Tennessee’s pass rushers excited. Tim Banks won’t be afraid to go after Rattler thanks to a secondary playing with more confidence. Their play hasn’t been perfect, but it is clear that Tennessee has more faith in its cornerbacks than earlier in the season. Doneiko Slaughter has played great since the Kentucky game, and Brandon Turnage is consistently showing the talent that occasionally flashed last season. The Cocks do have a handful of long pass plays on the season, and Tennessee should expect the Kitchen Sink in this game. Still, the Vols need to attack this shaky South Carolina offense. They can’t play conservatively against a unit that didn’t score a single point in Gainesville last weekend.

Matchup on Offense: Run them over to set up the pass. Tennessee has a chance to really ground and pound this South Carolina defense Saturday night. The Cocks are coming off a game where Florida ran for over 370 yards on them. Shane Beamer admitted that Florida’s offensive tempo really gave South Carolina issues. This is a Gamecock defense that has been gashed on the ground a few times this season; both Arkansas and Vanderbilt ran for over 200 yards on the Cocks. Those two teams, along with Florida, have running quarterbacks. With Hendon Hooker included, the Vols have four real threats out of the backfield. Freshman Dylan Sampson reemerged against Missouri last week to the tune of 8 carries for 98 yards. Passing protection concerns aside, Sampson surely earned more carries this weekend. Tennessee needs to press the tempo, and rotate fresh legs into its backfield constantly. I wouldn’t be surprised to see Hooker flirt with 100 yards rushing, a mark he has cleared just once this year.

The reality is South Carolina’s front seven on defense have made very little impact this season. The Cocks are basically at the bottom of the SEC in sacks and tackles for loss. This is a run defense giving up 192 ypg, and an overall defense that isn’t great getting off the field on third down. The Cocks are good at takeaways, and are tied for the SEC lead in interceptions at 11. That won’t scare Josh Heupel from airing it out, but I expect Heupel will want to get the momentum started on the ground. The Vols will want to force South Carolina to bring that second safety down in run support, and that is where the opportunities open up downfield. Tennessee has completed 35 passing plays of 30 or more yards, the next closest SEC team is Arkansas at 20. Heupel is going to air it out Saturday night. The Vols will use the run game to open up this South Carolina defense first though.

Fun Fact: I was not going to highlight Darius Rucker as a notable alumni of USC. Rucker is arguably the biggest cheeseball in country music, which says a lot. Darius had a fun time dissing Tennessee as he played his hit cover of a cover song while celebrating a women’s basketball national championship. Sadly everything about that sentence is true. The chorus to Wagon Wheel was written nearly 50 years ago by Bob Dylan before Old Crow Medicine Show finished out the lyrics and made the song famous in the early 2000’s. It was around the same time Rucker was filming Burger King commercials. Nothing about that guy says sellout, gee whiz. Hopefully Shane Beamer already has him booked for the Duke’s Mayo Bowl halftime show.

So What Happens? On paper, this is a really nice match up for Tennessee. South Carolina’s offense is reeling after failing to score a single point in Gainesville last weekend. The Gamecocks do a poor job handling pressure, and all Tim Banks wants to do is bring pressure. The Cocks lead the SEC in turnovers, and Tennessee’s defense leads the SEC in takeaways. Defensively, South Carolina really struggled with Florida’s tempo last week. Tennessee will try to go even faster. While the Gamecock defense has done a good job forcing turnovers this year, the Vols turn it over less than any team in the SEC. On paper, the three touchdown spread makes a lot of sense. Goofy things can happen in late November though, and South Carolina is led by General Goofball. Shane Beamer has inherited his father’s knack for big special teams plays, and an early one of those could totally change the mood inside Williams-Bryce Stadium. Tennessee has to keep this from being a goofy game. Pre-snap penalties were horrific last time the Vols went on the road. That stops the tempo of this offense, and keeps it out of rhythm. There are several little things that could easily veer this game into an uncomfortable four quarter affair. I don’t think that happens though. This Tennessee team appears pretty focused, and won’t forget their last road trip. The Vols will have a little playoff juice, some Heisman trophy juice, and even some Orange helmet juice. The Vols play their game, and win the turnover battle. Vols 49, Gamecocks 20

Native American Celebration this Saturday at Hagood Mill ** Online Exclisive**

PICKENS — In observance of Native American Heritage Month, Hagood Mill Historic Site will be hosting their annual Native American Celebration on Saturday, November 19th from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.This very popular annual event celebrates Native American history and traditions. A number of tribal groups from the Southeastern region of U.S. will be represented.Visitors and guest performers will participate in the festivities of the day which will include: traditional drumming, singing, dancing, Native American flut...

PICKENS — In observance of Native American Heritage Month, Hagood Mill Historic Site will be hosting their annual Native American Celebration on Saturday, November 19th from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.

This very popular annual event celebrates Native American history and traditions. A number of tribal groups from the Southeastern region of U.S. will be represented.

Visitors and guest performers will participate in the festivities of the day which will include: traditional drumming, singing, dancing, Native American flute playing, storytelling, Cherokee hymns in the Cherokee language, and traditional crafts. Demonstrations will be going on all day throughout the Mill Site including traditional Cherokee blow-gun demonstrations, traditional Catawba pottery making, beadwork, basket making, flint-knapping, finger-weaving, atl atl spear throwing, bow and arrow shooting and more. Many of the participants will have traditional handmade crafts for sale, as well.

Featured performers for this year’s event will include Keepers of the Word drumming group from Saint George, SC. Members of Keepers of the Word are of Ojibwa, Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Catawba, and Wassamassaw tribal heritage from Colleton, Berkeley, Dorchester, Orangeburg, and Sumter counties. Directed by Cathy Nelson, Keepers of the Word has presented a variety of Native American educational programs as well as spiritual formation seminars and retreats throughout the Southeast.

This event will also feature the Edisto River Singers from the state recognized Edisto Natchez-Kusso Tribe of South Carolina. Don’t miss these talented entertainers as they demonstrate the traditional drumming, singing, and dancing from one of South Carolina most ancient indigenous tribes.

Nancy Basket will be demonstrating her world class basket making skills. Nancy will also share some Native American myths and legends with visitors and guests.

Tradition Native American cooking demonstrations such as stone grinding of cornmeal, preparing and cooking fry-bead, and roasting corn will take place throughout the day.

Collected over generations, some of the truly awesome Crawford Collection of local prehistoric stone points, blades, and tools will be on display for the day. Barry Crawford’s pre-historic cooking demonstration using ancient soapstone bowl is too artful to be missed.

Members from the Archaeological Society of SC will be on site to identify Native American stone tools and artifacts.

There will be a special “children’s corner,” where visitors can make beaded necklaces, and have their face painted in a Native American style. For a special treat, visitors will be allowed to “paint” live horses with their hand prints in the style of the Plains Indians. This is always lots of fun for everyone.

There will be much more to see and do on November 19th as we host a variety of folk life and traditional arts demonstrations. There will be blacksmithing, bowl-digging, flint knapping, chair-caning, moonshining, broom-making, basket-making, pottery, quilting, spinning, knitting, weaving, woodcarving, hearth cooking, metal-smithing, leather-working and more. You can ask questions of the artists and make a purchase of their Traditional Arts to take home.

The Centerpiece of the Hagood Mill historic site is the water-powered 1845 gristmill. It is one of the finest examples of nineteenth century technology in the Upcountry and operates just as it has for the last century and a half. The mill will be running throughout the day. In the old mill, fresh stone-ground corn meal, grits, and wheat flour will be available.

Admission is $5 for adults. Kids 12 years and under will receive free admission for this event.

Primitive camping will be available Friday and Saturday nights– $10/tent for one or two nights (tent/car camping) or $20 for RV spaces. Limit 6 people per site. Car and RV spaces are limited, so register online soon. Folks with loud generators will be asked not to use them during special events.

Visit our website for full event details and to access the ticket portal:

Text GRITS to 85100 to stay in the loop of all things happening at the Hagood Mill and to receive exclusive offers.

So, head on out, grab a plate of great food on site from one of our fabulous food trucks and enjoy a fun-filled day exploring our ancestral grounds. This will be a very special November Third Saturday at the Hagood Mill Historic Site – a day that will make memories for you and your loved ones. It is sure to be a day well spent.

Hagood Mill Historic Site is open Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. all year long. The Hagood Creek Petroglyph Site is open Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday from 10 am to 4 pm. The mill operates, rain or shine, with a major festival the Third Saturday of every month.

Hagood Mill Historic Site is located just three miles north of Pickens off US Highway 178 west or 5.5 miles south of Cherokee Foothills SC Scenic Hwy 11 off Highway 178 E at 138 Hagood Mill Road.

For additional information please contact Hagood Mill at (864) 898-2936, or check us out on Facebook and Instagram.

The best time to visit South Carolina

South Carolina is famous for the southern-charm-filled cities of Charleston and Beaufort, sparkling sea islands with Gullah heritage, and the up-and-coming capital city of Columbia.When planning a visit, there’s no shortage of things to do – from prime fishing lakes and streams to champion trees towering above record-breaking bottomland forests or ...

South Carolina is famous for the southern-charm-filled cities of Charleston and Beaufort, sparkling sea islands with Gullah heritage, and the up-and-coming capital city of Columbia.

When planning a visit, there’s no shortage of things to do – from prime fishing lakes and streams to champion trees towering above record-breaking bottomland forests or hiking trails through waterfall-filled woodlands.

Forge new connections on your next adventure with the latest advice from our weekly newsletter.

But before you book your trip, make a list of the top things you want to do in South Carolina and check the weather forecast. The last thing you want is to be sweating through Charleston’s cobbled streets in the unforgiving humidity or going to the beach during a hurricane threat.

Here’s our guide to the best time to visit South Carolina.

The high season is the best time to go to the beach (June-August)

There’s no way around it – summer in this subtropical state is miserably hot and humid. The best place to escape the heat is along the palm-bedecked coast. Expect crowds, higher prices and lower availability. Pack sunscreen, sunglasses, and beachwear.

Consider visiting attractions that have air-conditioning, such as Columbia’s plethora of excellent museums like the South Carolina State Museum and Columbia Museum of Art. The restaurant scene in the capital city is a mix of traditional favorites and pioneering newcomers with Terra and SmallSUGAR at the top of the list.

Fishing and splashing in the Upstate lakes and rivers are an option, too. The temps are slightly cooler as you travel toward the hills of Appalachia, in the state’s northwestern corner.

The hardest time to get a room (or a cheap flight) in Charleston is during Spoleto (Memorial Day to mid-June), the several-week event when the city’s churches, theaters and outdoor spaces are filled with performances.

The city sees fewer visitors from July to mid-September, thanks to the heat. On the flip side, it’s a good time to go if you want to snag dinner reservations at one of the city’s coveted restaurants. Bring an umbrella to protect yourself from sudden thunderstorms.

Enjoy outdoor festivals during shoulder season (April/May and September/October)

South Carolina is in glorious bloom in April and May, with relatively fewer visitors and mild, sunny weather. Festivals explode throughout the state, celebrating food, wine, music and horses.

This is also a good time to explore the offerings of Charleston, Columbia, Beaufort and Greenville. Keep in mind that early spring is tornado season and there’s a chance of thunderstorms – pack light layers, an umbrella, and a jacket.

Fall brings spectacular foliage in the mountains and tolerable temps throughout. It’s a great time for mountain hikes, scenic drives, and golfing. Festivals continue with an autumnal theme, including beer, shrimp, food, and music. Bring a sweater for cooler nights.

Low season is perfect for budget travelers (November-March)

As winter blankets the land, the tourist crush subsides, and accommodation rates become less expensive.

The temperatures are mild, with crisp nights and brief cold spells. Along the coast, the average daytime temp is 60°F – perfect for a walk on the beach. Bear in mind that the farther inland you go toward Appalachia, the cooler it gets – nighttime temps can drop to freezing.

There is some snowfall, though snowstorms are rare. Pack a mid-weight jacket and sweaters. Though you'll spot locals wearing scarves and mittens, it's generally in the interests of fashion rather than warmth!

When is hurricane season?

Hurricane season kicks in late August through October, with September being the highest risk. Tornados threaten again in November.

The state’s coldest month, the average daytime temp is 58°F – not too bad for a winter’s day. Though if you head to the mountains, the thermometer can dip into the 40s and below. Accommodations are at their lowest rates.

Winter is on its way out and temperatures start to climb, though it’s still chilly and there can be rain. Festivals gain momentum. Camellias start to bloom, especially gorgeous at Middleton Place. There are still deals to be found for hotels.

Key Events: Southeastern Wildlife Exhibition in Charleston, Lowcountry Oyster Festival in Charleston, Hilton Head Island Seafood Festival

March can be wet, though temperatures are mild. Wildflowers start appearing everywhere. Birds start their spring migration along the Atlantic Flyway; hot spots include Huntington Beach, considered by many to be the best bird-watching spot along the East Coast. Triple Crown equestrian events take place in Aiken.

Key Events: Charleston Food & Wine Festival, Craftsmen’s Classics Art & Craft Festival in Columbia

Azaleas and dogwoods bloom, and the temps are mild, making this the ideal time to hike, bike, cycle and golf.

Extraordinary spring wildflowers ignite the landscape from April into May, from the Upstate to the Lowcountry. Local farmer’s markets open up throughout the region, their stalls laden with squash, zucchini, and sweet peas.

In late spring look for soft-shell crabs – Atlantic blue crabs that have recently molted their hard shell and are deep-fried or pan-seared and often tucked into a sandwich. You’ll find them on menus across the state, though the best places are in the Lowcountry.

Key Events: Aiken Horse Show, World Grits Festival in St. George, Charleston Jazz Festival, Historic Pendleton Spring Jubilee, RBC Heritage Classic Golf Tournament in Hilton Head

Everything, including prices, starts to heat up. Water parks and other summer attractions open their doors. Look for Georgia peaches, field peas, and okra at farmer’s markets and roadside stands.

Key Events: Freedom Weekend Aloft in Anderson, Original Gullah Festival in Beaufort, Artisphere in Greenville, Cook Out Southern 500 in Darlington

This month is one of the best times to be outdoors in South Carolina – summer wildflowers line the trails and the river rafting in the mountains is sublime. It starts heating up toward the end of the month. Shrimp is plentiful along the coast into late December.

The state’s hottest month, it’s miserably warm and muggy (the seasonal norm is 94°F, plus humidity). It’s also the state’s wettest month, with an average of 5.5 inches of rain. It’s a good time to head to the beach or the mountains. Pack an umbrella, just in case.

Fourth of July events explode throughout the state, with some of the best in Charleston, Myrtle Beach, Columbia, and Greenville.

Lake Murray hosts thousands of purple martins, which depart from their summer home on Doolittle Island in a flurry of flapping wings, returning at dusk in another spectacular show.

Key Events: Beaufort Water Festival, South Carolina Peach Festival in Gaffney, The Sweetgrass Festival in Mount Pleasant

Peak tourism season arrives, with the beaches especially crowded with visitors. Keep an eye on hurricanes potentially brewing along the coast.

Key Events: Gullah/Geechee Nation International Music & Movement Festival in Charleston, Low Country Jazz Festival in North Charleston

The heat slowly retreats, which is why September (and October) offer an inordinate amount of food, wine, music and arts festivals. Fall colors begin to show, especially in the Upstate, and U-pick farms are abundant. The oyster season kicks off; watch for oyster roasts along the coast.

Key Events: Euphoria in Greenville, MOJA Arts Festival in Charleston, South Carolina Tobacco Festival in Lake City, South Carolina Apple Festival in Westminster

The festival season continues, including house tours, food-and-wine fests, and the state fair. Football is in the air everywhere; good luck finding a room in Columbia and Clemson if the Gamecocks and Tigers are playing at home. Polo and steeplechase tournaments take place in Aiken.

Fall foliage in the Upstate is at its crowning glory (though you’ll see color well into December in some places); enjoy it along trails in state parks including Caesars Head and Table Rock, which you can access along the Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway.

Late October into November is peak monarch butterfly migration season when thousands of these orange-and-black beauties stop by Lowcountry beaches to fill up with nectar; they prefer groundsel trees, a large shrub with stiff, spreading branches.

Key Events: South Carolina Jazz Festival, The Fall Tours of Homes and Gardens, Beaufort Shrimp Festival, South Carolina State Fair in Columbia

The temps start dipping into the 50s, with the possibility of rain. Fall foliage continues in the Upstate.

Key Events: Hilton Head Island Concours d’Elegance & Motoring Festival, Dickens Christmas Show & Festivals in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina Pecan Festival in Florence

As the temperatures cool – averaging in the mid-50s – the holiday season brings parades, holiday lights, and other festive events.

For the first time ever, Lonely Planet's experts have compiled the USA's 500 most memorable, beautiful, surprising and compelling experiences. Ponder the scope of the Grand Canyon, delve into the history of a nation of immigrants at Ellis Island or wander across architectural grandeur at Golden Gate Bridge. Where will you go next?

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England greeted by excited fans on arrival at World Cup in Qatar

Gareth Southgate waved at excited fans as England arrived at their World Cup base to ramp up their quest for Qatar glory.Having finished runners-up at last summer’s European Championship on the back of reaching the semi-finals in ...

Gareth Southgate waved at excited fans as England arrived at their World Cup base to ramp up their quest for Qatar glory.

Having finished runners-up at last summer’s European Championship on the back of reaching the semi-finals in Russia four years ago, the Three Lions are among the favourites to triumph in the Middle East.

Southgate’s 26-man squad linked up at St George’s Park on Monday fresh from the Premier League pausing and followed a whirlwind day of duties by jetting off to Qatar on Tuesday.

England flew on a plane called ‘Rain Bow’ – noteworthy given the host country’s oppressive laws and treatment of LGBTQ+ people – and touched down in Doha at around 8pm local time.

The Three Lions received a passionate welcome from several hundred people in Al Wakrah – the coastline city they hope to call home for the next four weeks.

England are staying on the shore of the Arabian Gulf at the five-star Souq Al Wakra Hotel, where fans replete in replica shirts and carrying St George’s flags enthusiastically welcomed the team.

“It’s coming home” and the less familiar “Gareth Southgate super coach” were among the chants from supporters, many of whom were of Indian descent.

The fans strongly rebuffed any suggestion they had been paid by organisers to welcome the team.

“We are not paid,” said one fan, who wished to remain anonymous. “Even if someone offered money to us for loving England we would rather tell them to get lost.”

Another supporter showed the ‘England Fans Qatar’ group on WhatsApp, which had 535 members. He said five more similar chats were also running.

Fans said their support for England was born out of their love of the Premier League, citing the likes of former stars Wayne Rooney, David Beckham and John Terry.

SC starts 12 days of early voting on Monday. What you need to know.

Two weeks of no-excuse-needed early voting kicks off Oct. 24 at more than 100 locations statewide, giving South Carolinians more options than ever for casting a ballot with hopefully little to no wait.It’s South Carolina’s first general election under a Statehouse law signed by Gov. Henry McMaster in May which directed each county to open up to seven early voting sites for 12 days through the Saturday before Election Day.All locations must open to voters from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. in all 46 counties from the coast to ...

Two weeks of no-excuse-needed early voting kicks off Oct. 24 at more than 100 locations statewide, giving South Carolinians more options than ever for casting a ballot with hopefully little to no wait.

It’s South Carolina’s first general election under a Statehouse law signed by Gov. Henry McMaster in May which directed each county to open up to seven early voting sites for 12 days through the Saturday before Election Day.

All locations must open to voters from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. in all 46 counties from the coast to the mountains.

The exception is Oct. 30, as the law forbids Sunday voting.

Early voters can choose whatever site is most convenient for them within the county where they’re registered, whether that’s close to home, work or shopping. They aren’t limited by their home address.

“Early voting is a big deal for South Carolina,” state Election Commission spokesman Chris Whitmire said. “It gives a lot more access, more options for busy people to go vote. That’s the biggest benefit.”

It also should reduce stress on poll workers and give them more time to fix problems as they arise, which in turn also benefits voters, he said.

“Whatever line you’ve had before will be better,” Whitmire said.

The 111 early voting sites statewide represent a 35 percent increase from the total that opened before the June primaries, when election officers had less than three weeks to put the new rules into practice.

Nineteen of South Carolina’s rural counties are still offering a single location, usually at their main election office.

Some of the most-populous counties are providing several additional options. For example, Lexington went from one to five. Charleston County, which also offered a single site in June, is among three counties opening the maximum seven.

Greenville and Horry counties are the other two with seven.

Voting sites for every county can be found on the S.C. Election Commission website at scvotes.gov/voters/early-voting. By law, each county election office must also post local locations on its own website.

Voting absentee by mail is also underway. Those who qualify include people who are 65 and older, have physical disabilities, or work a job that doesn’t allow them to vote in person during the two-week early voting window. Applications must be in by Oct. 28. People returning a mailed ballot in person must show identification.

Charleston County, which has opened satellite offices since 2016 under prior law that required an excuse for voting early, has planned since January to open seven once the legislation passed. But when the final version didn’t allow for mobile sites as intended, the county reverted to one, but only for the primaries, said Isaac Cramer, director of the Charleston County Board of Elections.

Local sites for this election include four libraries and two churches spread out from Hollywood to Mount Pleasant, with the largest site being the North Charleston Convention Center. That was a popular spot for voters in November 2020, Cramer said.

Amid the pandemic, legislators passed a temporary law allowing no-excuse-needed in-person absentee voting for that election only. One problem was that access varied widely across the state. Even so, it marked the first time that more South Carolinians voted early than on Election Day.

Two years later under the new law requiring options with standardized hours, Charleston County has added sites on James Island, Johns Island and Hollywood.

“We wanted to expand to areas with population growth and rural areas so people across the county would have shorter distances to travel,” Cramer said.

The more than 150 additional workers hired specifically for early voting began weeklong training sessions Oct. 17. They’re prepared for busy, 12-hour days. They’ll stay on through Election Day at $15 an hour, which becomes $22.50 hourly for required overtime, he said.

In the Upstate, Greenville and Spartanburg counties each hired dozens of additional poll workers for early voting.

Staffing concerns are partly why Spartanburg went with three offerings for its first election with multiple sites, said its elections director, Adam Hammons.

Since turnout is generally lower for midterm elections than in presidential contests, “starting with three early voting centers that are fully staffed and ready for voters was our decision,” he said.

It’s among 10 counties opening three locations.

Others include nearby Pickens County, Dorchester County in the Lowcountry, and York County south of Charlotte, as well as rural Barnwell and Hampton counties along the Georgia line.

Georgetown and Beaufort counties are each operating four sites.

Georgetown officials didn’t see a reason to open the max, said elections director Aphra McCrea.

There was an obvious need for a location in the Waccamaw Neck, a peninsula east of the Waccamaw River that is where most voters live. The county office made sense as it’s already equipped to handle early voting. The other two were put in locations convenient for rural residents, McCrea said.

Lexington and Richland are the only counties offering five locations.

Richland County has had more shakeups at its long-troubled election agency in the last few months, to include the resignation of its director. But interim director Terry Graham, who also submitted a resignation letter before agreeing to stay through the elections, insisted the county is prepared for the election and early voting.

County officials considered expanding to six but decided it lacked sufficient workers and money for an additional site, he said.

“Money always is a deciding factor. If we could do more, we would do more,” he said. “We didn’t want to spread ourselves too thin by adding more people and more locations.”

Spencer Donovan contributed from Greenville. Leah Hincks contributed from Columbia. Mike Woodel contributed from Georgetown. Nicole Ziege contributed from Myrtle Beach.

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  • Thu – 8:00am to 12:00pm – 2:00pm to 6:00pm
  • Fri – 8:00am to 12:00pm

Service Areas

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