Chiropractic Care in Seabrook Island, SC

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At Seabrook Island Spine & Disc Center, we offer our valued clients a wide range of chiropractic services that solve serious symptoms like:

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If you are always in pain and have given up on your doctor's suggested therapies, we've got great news - a permanent solution to your back and foot pain may be closer than you might think.

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At Seabrook Island Spine & Disc Center, our doctors are not just experts. They're people, too, and understand how pain and back problems can be crippling. Our goal is to get you well as soon as possible, without drugs or surgeries. That way, you can get back to a normal, healthy living for years to come.

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If you find yourself in a situation where you need to see a chiropractor as soon as possible, we're here for you. Our chiropractors have treated thousands of patients, and we can treat you too.

Our office offers a robust range of chiropractic services in Seabrook Island, from custom shoe insoles for your feet to adjustments and massages for your back.

Seabrook Island Spine & Disc Center: Treating More Than Symptoms

Are you looking for a chiropractor in Seabrook Island, SC who treats more than just symptoms? If you're sick of chiropractic services that aren't tailored to your needs and body, it's time to make a change. Our expert chiropractors at Seabrook Island Spine & Disc Center focus on your needs, not an idealized version of you. From chiropractic adjustments to custom shoe inserts and spinal decompression, we have the services and treatments you need to live life to the fullest.

Ready to live your best life free of pain? Contact our office today or explore our site to learn more about the Seabrook Island Spine & Disc Center difference. We want you to feel comfortable knowing that you will be treated with care, compassion, and excellence every time you visit our office.

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Latest News in Seabrook Island, SC

Seabrook Island neighbors push for short-term rental cap, mayor says no cap needed

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Seabrook Island neighbors are petitioning their leaders to cap the number of short-term rentals, stating there is overcrowding due to what they called over-tourism, but the mayor said the town has no plans to do so.Seabrook Island homeowner Ted Flerlage says over 700 of his neighbors want to cap the number of short-term rentals on the island.“What we’re trying to do is cap, not end the process of short-term rentals, cap at roughly the present numbers, evaluate what happens after that,&...

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Seabrook Island neighbors are petitioning their leaders to cap the number of short-term rentals, stating there is overcrowding due to what they called over-tourism, but the mayor said the town has no plans to do so.

Seabrook Island homeowner Ted Flerlage says over 700 of his neighbors want to cap the number of short-term rentals on the island.

“What we’re trying to do is cap, not end the process of short-term rentals, cap at roughly the present numbers, evaluate what happens after that,” Flerlage said, “and then, determine whether or not we should lower the number of short-term rentals.”

As of June 19, there are 484 of these properties on the island, which residents said has led to overcrowding on the island’s streets and amenities.

Mayor John Gregg said for this year, data gathered over the past few months suggest otherwise.

“We’re not going to be looking at imposing limitations on the number of short-term rental units,” Gregg said.

Coastal Getaways owner Nancy Buck said more people are starting to call the island home, and good rentals are full for around 40% of the year.

She says all of her clients are property owners who rent to help offset the costs of the amenities, taxes and insurance.

“We’ve also gone from 35% permanent residents to 60% residents in the last two years,” Buck said. “Twenty-five percent of the properties have turned over since 2019.”

Buck also adds the majority of the amenities are mostly used by members and not rental guests.

However, the homeowners want the town’s government to hear them out.

“I’d like him to reconsider,” Flerlage said. “I’d like him to look at the reality and listen to the people who are property owners here, the residents on the island. You know, 700 people is a big number.”

“Let’s wait and see how this year goes,” Buck said. “They instituted the short-term rental ordinance couple of years ago, or actually, last year, so let’s give it a full year to see how it goes.”

Both Buck and the homeowners said they want to work out their differences over the next several months to come up with a solution that works for everyone.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

7 Things to Do in Kiawah Island, South Carolina

It’s high time you added this Lowcountry destination to your beach bucket list.Follow winding, oak-shaded roads 25 miles southwest of downtown Charleston's cobblestone streets and celebrated restaurant scene, and you'll find yourself on Kiawah Island. Carved by the Kiawah River on one side and fronting the Atlantic Ocean on the other, the barrier ...

It’s high time you added this Lowcountry destination to your beach bucket list.

Follow winding, oak-shaded roads 25 miles southwest of downtown Charleston's cobblestone streets and celebrated restaurant scene, and you'll find yourself on Kiawah Island. Carved by the Kiawah River on one side and fronting the Atlantic Ocean on the other, the barrier island is a true escape. Here, nature reigns supreme: ten miles of beaches roll out along the Atlantic; cicadas form their own sort of soundtrack; and lights-out is often determined by the sea turtles' nesting season. Even so, there's plenty to do for travelers who like their time in nature punctuated with good food, luxurious creature comforts, and a frozen drink in hand. Here are seven things to do in Kiawah Island, South Carolina.

Stay Like a Local

For access to all of Kiawah's amenities, from bike rentals to pools, you'll have to stay on the island. For an experience that's luxurious but unpretentious, book a room at The Sanctuary, an oceanfront hotel known for its five-star service and elevated onsite dining. For families who want a little room to spread out (or a kitchen), villa and home rentals are a smart choice; reserve through the resort directly, or book through a site like VRBO or Airbnb.

Spend a Day on the Sand

On the west end of the island, Beachwalker Park is Kiawah's only public beach access feels like a hidden gem, thanks to its wide, unspoiled expanses of sand. It offers the best of both worlds too: in addition to the ocean frontage, you can also score views of the Kiawah River here.

Hit the Links

Five state-of-the-art golf courses are open to the public. For avid fans of the sport, the Ocean Course alone makes Kiawah worth the trip. Host to two PGA Championships, the 18-hole course is not for the faint of heart. Raised above the dunes to capitalize on the expansive shore views, golfers are also subjected to ocean breezes (which don't exactly make for an easy or predictable trip around the green). Try Cougar Point for marsh views and a slightly less technical experience.

Go for a Cruise

One of the best ways to explore the island is to leave the car in park and take a beach cruiser for a spin (you can reserve them through the resort or bring your own). Between 30 miles of paved trails and 10 miles of hard-packed beach, there's no shortage of routes to explore. Ask for directions to the Marsh View Tower, an observation deck primed for birdwatching and soaking in the marsh and river scenery.

Visit Heron Park Nature Center

The naturalists here will school you in many of the species who call the island home, from bobcats and white-tailed deer to loggerhead sea turtles and American alligators. Sign up for a guided tour, like "Back Island Birding", "Marsh Kayaking," or "Ocean Seining and Beach Combing," or ask for their recommendations for the best nature-spotting places in the area.

Explore Freshfields Village

Built around a lush lawn, Freshfields Village has plenty of restaurants and shops to explore, plus a boutique stay, the Andell Inn. Pick up a beach read at Indigo Books; snag treats for your four-legged friends at Dolitte's; and gear up for island adventures SeaCoast Sports and Outfitters. Start the morning with coffee and a breakfast sandwich from Java Java; settle in for grilled cheese and a milkshake at retro Vincent's Drugstore & Soda Fountain; or cap off the day with house-made frosé from newly opened The Co-Op. Check their calendar for seasonal events, like summertime's "Music on the Green" concert series and farmer's market.

Venture to Bohicket Marina & Market

Make the short drive to neighboring Seabrook Island for a taste of the area's salty maritime culture. Snag a umbrella-shaded table on the upper deck at Salty Dog Café for fresh catch, a cold beer, and riverfront views of the boats coming and going from the marina.

Kiawah Island Corridor Study ‘Critically Important’ Priority

By Theresa Stratford for The Island ConnectionAs development increases on Kiawah Island, so does the traffic, which is why road improvements are a priority for the Town of Kiawah Island. Dillon Turner of Kimley Horn, the consultant working with the Town on recommendations for the potential impacts on the Kiawah Island Parkway, presented a final report of long-term and short-term findings at the Town Council meeting on June 7. Turner presented a preliminary assessment in March of proposed recommendations based on the study the Kimley H...

By Theresa Stratford for The Island Connection

As development increases on Kiawah Island, so does the traffic, which is why road improvements are a priority for the Town of Kiawah Island. Dillon Turner of Kimley Horn, the consultant working with the Town on recommendations for the potential impacts on the Kiawah Island Parkway, presented a final report of long-term and short-term findings at the Town Council meeting on June 7. Turner presented a preliminary assessment in March of proposed recommendations based on the study the Kimley Horn team conducted in the late summer and early fall of 2021. They considered future development on and off the island with assumptions made to determine significant impacts on the Kiawah Island Parkway as a whole.

Turner said, “I walked the corridor. I observed the intersections, what people are doing, speeds, etc.” Turner met with the Town for further data and studied any vacant land around the town and what could go on in the long term.

According to the study, existing conditions for the study were set in 2021, short-term is 2026 conditions and long-term is 2036 conditions. The short-term conditions included known upcoming developments in or near the Town of Kiawah Island that can increase traffic volume on Town’s roads.

The long term conditions included vacant parcels of land that are not currently slated for development but could be developed in the future.

The recommendations are as follows:

Short-Term:

1. Kiawah Island Parkway at Beachwalker Drive: To mitigate the anticipated long delays at this intersection, a modification to the westbound approach is recommended. With this improvement the removal of the bike path from Oyster Rake Drive also is recommended. With this improvement, the westbound through lane will operate as free-flow and the and the westbound left-turn lane be channelized. Furthermore, an eastbound right-turn lane will be constructed. These improvements significantly decrease the delays at the intersection.

2. Kiawah Island Parkway at the Real Estate Office: The Kiawah Island Parkway at Beachwalker Drive improvement project, would cause this intersection to become right-in/right-out. A connection will be required from Beachwalker Drive to the Real Estate Office for the restricted westbound and northbound left turn movements from Kiawah Island Parkway at the Real Estate Office. Once the Real Estate Office becomes right-in/right-out, the northbound approach delays are anticipated to be less than existing conditions.

3. Kiawah Island Parkway at Andell West Development/Lot B: A roundabout and traffic signal were analyzed at this intersection. A traffic signal serves the long-term development conditions better than a roundabout. The traffic signal forces gaps for the side-street movements and allows for left-turn phasing. The roundabout would operate well for the short-term conditions but is anticipated to fail in the long-term conditions. Therefore, a traffic signal is recommended over the roundabout at this intersection. The traffic signal can be more adaptable to future growth than the roundabout and would require less right-of-way than the roundabout.

4. Kiawah Island Parkway at Freshfields Drive: To mitigate long side-street delays on Freshfields Drive, it is recommended that the proposed Andell West Development interconnect to the Freshfields Development and this access will become right-in/ right-out. The left-turns entering and exiting Freshfields Drive can be diverted to Village Green Lane, the Andell West access on Kiawah Island Parkway, or the future Lot C access on Seabrook Island Road. With these improvements in place, the northbound approach delay is anticipated to significantly decrease.

Long-Term:

1. Kiawah Island Parkway/Seabrook Island Road at Betsy Kerrison Parkway/Village Green Lane: To mitigate long delays on Seabrook Island Road, a turbo roundabout is recommended. The turbo roundabout would allow for an eastbound left-turn and an eastbound through-right lane. In addition to the turbo roundabout at this intersection, consideration should be given to connecting the multi-use path from its terminus on Betsy Kerrison Parkway, across Haulover Creek, and into Freshfields. This would require a pedestrian bridge across Haulover Creek.

2. Kiawah Island Parkway at Old Cedar Lane: To mitigate long delays on Old Cedar Lane, it is recommended to construct an exclusive eastbound right-turn lane on Old Cedar Lane. The eastbound right-turn lane is to help reduce the side street delays and queues. With this improvement in place, the eastbound approach is anticipated to continue to fail, but the queue lengths are anticipated to significantly decrease. It is not atypical for side streets to fail during peak hour conditions.

3. Betsy Kerrison Parkway at Camp Care Road/Lot A: Due to the high through volume and speeds on this section of Betsy Kerrison Parkway, left- and right-turn lanes should be considered for the Lot A development. Even with these turn lanes, the westbound approach is anticipated to fail during the evening peak hour. However, the projected volumes for the development intensity assumed for Lot A are not high enough to warrant a traffic signal per the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices guidelines. If Lot A does develop, a formal traffic study should be performed.

4. Seabrook Island Road at Andell Bluff Boulevard/Lot C: When the northbound driveway connection was considered for Lot C, the southbound approach was anticipated to fail during the morning peak hour and the northbound and southbound approaches were anticipated to fail during the evening peak hour. To mitigate the delay on the side street Kiawah Island Parkway Intersection and Corridor Study approaches, a roundabout was considered. A single-lane roundabout is anticipated to significantly improve operations at this intersection.

Please note, Seabrook Island is currently considering a roundabout at this location, therefore it is listed as a low priority for the Town of Kiawah Island. Town Council asked many questions during the study like if the Town will see immediate improvements from some of the short-term concepts that are underway and what the status was from the Kiawah Island Community Association about moving the gate access. They asked about approving a stoplight, but were told that the ARB would have to be involved when it came to the aesthetics. Also, the traffic light would have to go under further study once the developments were in place to make sure they were warranted, according to Turner. Interconnectivity was also expressed as highly important. The study, which is available on the Town’s website is close to 400-pages long and includes figures demonstrating the recommendations.

Mayor John Labriola thanked Turner and Kiawah Island Planning Director John Taylor for their work in this “critically important study.”

MUSC Foundation receives $1M from Town of Kiawah Island in support of Sea Islands Medical Pavilion

CHARLESTON, S.C. (Jan. 13, 2022) –The Medical University of South Carolina Foundation has received a commitment of $1 million from the Town of Kiawah Island in support of MUSC Health’s Sea Islands Medical Pavilion.“We are grateful to the Town of Kiawah for its major investment in our mission and their ongoing partnership to help us enable the right care, in the right place and at the right time,” said David J. Cole, M.D., FACS, MUSC president. “This donation will make a significant differ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (Jan. 13, 2022) –The Medical University of South Carolina Foundation has received a commitment of $1 million from the Town of Kiawah Island in support of MUSC Health’s Sea Islands Medical Pavilion.

“We are grateful to the Town of Kiawah for its major investment in our mission and their ongoing partnership to help us enable the right care, in the right place and at the right time,” said David J. Cole, M.D., FACS, MUSC president. “This donation will make a significant difference as we seek to improve the well-being of the Sea Islands community, expand access to appropriate care, and bolster connectivity to the state’s only comprehensive academic health system when patients require the most complex care.”

The donation has been designated for a healing, restful green space and garden immediately adjacent to the new facility. Construction on the Sea Islands project is expected to begin in early 2022 and conclude in fall 2023.

“The Town is proud to invest in MUSC's Sea Islands Medical Pavilion and excited about the emergent care services it will provide to Kiawah, Seabrook, Johns and Wadmalaw Islands, and the broader community,” said Town of Kiawah Mayor John D. Labriola. “Our geography has always been a challenge and concern. This new facility will make a crucial difference in life-threatening emergencies and provide the Sea Island communities with greater ease of mind. We are grateful to MUSC for their pursuit of this project, to Kiawah Partners for donating the land, and to the other community partners who have made this possible.”

During the next five years, double digit population growth is anticipated in the Sea Islands community. This growth, along with the islands' geographic isolation, demographics, and community health profiles, has created an urgent need for additional health care services in this part of the South Carolina Lowcountry.

The area also accommodates a large seasonal population of tourists, many of whom have trouble navigating local health care services.

To meet this growing need, MUSC Health is building a new medical facility on Johns Island in the immediate vicinity of Kiawah and Seabrook islands. The facility will provide residents and visitors alike with convenient and rapid access to MUSC Health’s emergency care services, select outpatient services, and some of the nation’s top providers in primary and specialty care.

“People living in this area have to travel 30 or 45 minutes to reach the nearest hospital, sometimes more depending on traffic. That’s a big problem for someone having a stroke or cardiac event,” said Patrick J. Cawley, M.D., MUSC Health CEO and vice president for Health Affairs, University. “This new facility brings that care directly into the community. We’re extremely grateful to the Town of Kiawah and Kiawah Partners for helping to make that possible.”

The project was made possible in part by Kiawah Partners, which donated six acres of land to the Medical University Hospital Authority (MUSC Health), valued at $4.85 million. The project is estimated to cost $24 million. Of that amount, MUSC is working to raise $15 million in private support.

The 22,740-square-foot facility will be located at 1884 Seabrook Island Road, near Bohicket Marina. The ED will include four exam rooms, two trauma rooms, imaging and lab services and a helicopter pad. The medical office will offer primary and specialty care. A telemedicine network will connect the entire facility to MUSC Health providers in downtown Charleston for additional care and consultation, if needed.

In mid-June 2021, McMillan Pazdan Smith (MPS) was chosen to design the project. MPS is also one of two architectural firms working on designs for a new MUSC Health hospital in rural Williamsburg County.

Renderings of the Sea Islands medical pavilion are available upon request.

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About the MUSC Foundation

The Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Foundation was chartered in 1966 as a charitable educational foundation to support the education, research, patient care and other programs at the Medical University. The foundation is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization, contributions to which are tax-deductible.

Since its beginning, the MUSC Foundation has encouraged such worthwhile academic enterprises as endowed professorships; scholarships; the acquisition and development of campus facilities to serve student, teaching, research or clinical needs; and awards in honor of academic excellence. In addition, it has encouraged achievements in biomedical research.

The Foundation is governed by a 31-member board of directors. The president of the Medical University is an ex-officio, non-voting member of the board. Three members of the MUSC Board of Trustees also serve on the board. The remaining 27 at-large directors are not directly affiliated with the university. Five are alumni of MUSC. The foundation’s funds are invested and managed by professional money managers selected by the foundation’s Investment Committee. This committee uses a professional investment advisor to assist in evaluating its managers.

About MUSC

Founded in 1824 in Charleston, MUSC is home to the oldest medical school in the South as well as the state’s only integrated academic health sciences center, with a unique charge to serve the state through education, research and patient care. Each year, MUSC educates and trains more than 3,000 students and nearly 800 residents in six colleges: Dental Medicine, Graduate Studies, Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy. MUSC brought in more than $327.6 million in biomedical research funds in fiscal year 2021, continuing to lead the state in obtaining federal and National Institutes of Health funding, with more than $220 million. For information on academic programs, visit musc.edu.

As the clinical health system of the Medical University of South Carolina, MUSC Health is dedicated to delivering the highest-quality and safe patient care while training generations of compassionate, competent health care providers to serve the people of South Carolina and beyond. Patient care is provided at 14 hospitals with approximately 2,500 beds and five additional hospital locations in development, more than 300 telehealth sites and nearly 750 care locations situated in the Lowcountry, Midlands, Pee Dee and Upstate regions of South Carolina. In 2021, for the seventh consecutive year, U.S. News & World Report named MUSC Health the No. 1 hospital in South Carolina. To learn more about clinical patient services, visit muschealth.org.

MUSC and its affiliates have collective annual budgets of $4.4 billion. The nearly 24,000 MUSC team members include world-class faculty, physicians, specialty providers, scientists, and care team members who deliver groundbreaking education, research, technology and patient care.

Charleston-area to gain new French and Mediterranean restaurants; new Greek eatery opens

A French-inspired restaurant is adding a fourth location in the Lowcountry while a new Mediterranean-themed diner is now open and another is on the way.Saveurs du Monde Café plans to open in mid-March in the former McCann’s Irish Pub at 1001 Landfall Way on Seabrook Island, according to restaurant CEO Thierry Chateau.“We will serve breakfast, lunch and diner in a casual atmosphere — French-inspired, of course,” he said.It will be open 7:30 ...

A French-inspired restaurant is adding a fourth location in the Lowcountry while a new Mediterranean-themed diner is now open and another is on the way.

Saveurs du Monde Café plans to open in mid-March in the former McCann’s Irish Pub at 1001 Landfall Way on Seabrook Island, according to restaurant CEO Thierry Chateau.

“We will serve breakfast, lunch and diner in a casual atmosphere — French-inspired, of course,” he said.

It will be open 7:30 a.m.-11 p.m. with a band on Fridays. Alcoholic beverages, including local draft beers, will be offered.

Chateau’s three other café sites include two in Mount Pleasant in Belle Station and Seaside Farms and in Charleston in the WestEdge development on the peninsula.

Now serving

A new South Florida-based restaurant chain that plans to have four locations in the Lowcountry is now serving diners with its first South Carolina location on James Island.

The Great Greek Mediterranean Grill opened Feb. 14 at 1417 Folly Road in the Publix-anchored Riverland Market Shopping Center.

Another location is coming to northern Mount Pleasant in The Bend at Carolina Park, a retail center of five buildings across the street from Costco.

The new Charleston-area locations are owned and operated by franchisee Scott Willis and his family.

The menu includes homegrown recipes and traditional gyros along with lamb, steak and chicken souvlaki platters. The new location is open 11 a.m.-8 p.m. daily.

On the way

Also in the realm of Mediterranean fare, a restaurant chain based in the nation’s capital is in the works for the Charleston area.

Cava is set to open later this year in the former Zoë’s Kitchen space at 1242 Belk Drive in Mount Pleasant Towne Centre.

The Washington, D.C.-based company also plans to open its second South Carolina location in Greenville. Opening dates have not been announced for either location.

What’s cooking?

A fast-food chicken restaurant chain is adding a second location in Moncks Corner.

Bojangles plans to build a 2,858-square-foot dining venue at 2605 Highway 52 in Foxbank Town Center near Waffle House and Parker’s Kitchen convenience store. An opening timeframe has not been announced.

The chicken chain currently has 11 locations in the Charleston area.

The new restaurant will be close to a previously announced Dunkin’ donut shop.

Kickin’ Chicken recently opened on Charleston’s upper peninsula and will begin serving lunch at 11 a.m. on weekends starting Feb. 19.

The restaurant at 45 Romney St. offers evening service starting at 3 p.m. each day.

“We will expand our hours to include weekday lunches when staffing allows,” co-owner Chip Roberts said.

Plans are in the works to add a covered patio area as well. Construction should be completed by the spring, Roberts said.

Gassing up

A convenience store and gas station is in the works in the Johns Island area.

A 4,940-square-foot store with a canopied fueling station is being proposed on Main Road at McLernon Trace near Marsh View Trace Apartments. Gilligan’s Seafood Restaurant is to the south about one block.

The development is referred to as McLernon Trace Fuel Station. Site plans do not indicate the brand of fuel.

Now open

Two new dining concepts now serving in downtown Charleston will celebrate their grand openings with entertainment at 7 p.m. Feb. 17.

Uptown Hospitality Group, an offshoot of New York bar and restaurant group Eat Drink & Be Merry Hospitality, launched Bodega and Share House at 23 Ann St. on Feb. 15.

The two venues are set up in an 8,000-square-foot former train depot with large garage doors that open onto a block-long pedestrian walkway between Ann and John streets.

Bodega, which started as a pop-up in 2020 in the group’s Uptown Social venue on King Street, offers New York-style sandwiches and charcuterie while Share House brings a coastal cantina vibe with snacks and sliders on the menu. Alcoholic beverages also are available.

Uptown Hospitality Group is a product of New York transplants Keith Benjamin, Kara Graves, Bryn Kelly, Brian Dodd, Kat Moore and chef Alec Gropman.

“Although we are still under the Eat Drink & Be Merry umbrella, we felt it was important to develop a local brand with its own identity,” said Benjamin, group co-founder and senior operating partner.

Bodega will be open 7 a.m.-2 a.m. each day while operating hours for Share House will be 4 p.m.-2 a.m. Monday through Wednesday and noon-2 a.m. Thursday through Sunday.

Art walk

A Kiawah Island retail center is looking to welcome spring a bit early with an annual outdoor event.

The Art Walk is set for 4-7 p.m. Feb. 18 at the Harris Teeter-anchored Freshfields Village Shopping Center at the end of Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

Residents and visitors can watch live art demonstrations and view works from local and visiting artists in participating retail shops while enjoying live jazz music during the free event.

For more details, go to freshfieldsvillage.com/event/art-walk-2022.

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