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If you are always in pain and have given up on your doctor's suggested therapies, we've got great news - a permanent solution to your back and foot pain may be closer than you might think.

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At Mount Pleasant Spine & Disc Center, our doctors are not just experts. They're people, too, and understand how pain and back problems can be crippling. Our goal is to get you well as soon as possible, without drugs or surgeries. That way, you can get back to a normal, healthy living for years to come.

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Our office offers a robust range of chiropractic services near Mount Pleasant, from custom shoe insoles for your feet to adjustments and massages for your back.

Mount Pleasant Spine & Disc Center: Treating More Than Symptoms

Are you looking for a chiropractor near Mount Pleasant, SC who treats more than just symptoms? If you're sick of chiropractic services that aren't tailored to your needs and body, it's time to make a change. Our expert chiropractors at Mount Pleasant Spine & Disc Center focus on your needs, not an idealized version of you. From chiropractic adjustments to custom shoe inserts and spinal decompression, we have the services and treatments you need to live life to the fullest.

Ready to live your best life free of pain? Contact our office today or explore our site to learn more about the Mount Pleasant Spine & Disc Center difference. We want you to feel comfortable knowing that you will be treated with care, compassion, and excellence every time you visit our office.

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Latest News in Mount Pleasant, SC

Aiken Standard’s top 10 stories of 2023: No. 7 — Aiken Towne Park taking shape on Aiken Mall site

Editor’s note: The Aiken Standard is counting down its top 10 local stories for 2023 from Dec. 19-30.The redevelopment of the Aiken Mall was more of ...

Editor’s note: The Aiken Standard is counting down its top 10 local stories for 2023 from Dec. 19-30.

The redevelopment of the Aiken Mall was more of a concept than a reality for a long time, but that changed in 2023.

“A lot of progress was made,” said Jason Long, a senior vice president for Augusta-based Southeastern Development Associates, which is spearheading the effort.

“The demolition was completed,” he continued, “and the first two retail buildings went vertical and are nearing completion.

Aiken Area Business

Each of the approximately 5,000-square-foot structures will have a drive-thru.

Southeastern announced during the summer that it had two “committed” tenants for the buildings: Chicken Salad Chick and Tropical Smoothie Café, which both will be businesses new to Aiken.

Long told the Aiken Standard that he was expecting those restaurants to begin operations locally during the first quarter of 2024.

“We’ve also done more site work to prepare for the construction of additional retail buildings and multifamily [housing] that will start next year,” Long said.

The mixed-use project’s apartment complex will have 256 Class A units. Their rental fees probably will be in the $1,500 to $2,000 per month range, according to Long.

Whiskey Alley’s co-owner and executive chef, Chad Jajczyk, will be focusing on a type of cuisine that he especially enjoys at The Red Door.

The new eatery is scheduled to make its debut early next year in downtown Aiken, where Whiskey Alley also is based.

“I have been interested in Japanese cooking since I was in my 20s,” Jajczyk said. “This is my first opportunity to really explore it in a restaurant. I’ve dabbled with a lot of Asian food at Whiskey Alley, but I wanted to open up something downtown that was a nice Asian edition.”

The other members of Whiskey Alley’s ownership team, Norman Dunagan and Alexandrea Kneece, are joining Jajczyk in the venture.

“Ramen is probably going to be the biggest thing, and we’ll also have small plates and ‘shareables,’” said Jajczyk of The Red Door’s menu, which also will be influenced by food from other countries in the Far East.

To give people of preview of what The Red Door will be offering, there was a Japanese/whiskey-tasting dinner at Whiskey Alley earlier this month.

“I was worried because Japanese [fare] kind of scares some people sometimes, but it worked out really well,” Jajczyk said. “The reception was very good, so I was really happy.”

The Red Door’s location most recently was the home of an Irish pub, Jameson McDubby’s, which closed for good in September at 126 Laurens St. N.W.

Charleston’s Christmas Charm

Charleston has a unique and charming way of decorating for Christmas that reflects its rich history and Southern heritage. The city transforms into a festive wonderland with it’s historic streets adorned in elegant decorations. Charleston homes weave a tapestry of historical authenticity into their holiday decor, embracing timeless traditions with meticulously curated décor that aims to honor the Holy City’s history.You'll likely find streets lined with traditional garlands, wreaths, and twinkling lights adorning th...

Charleston has a unique and charming way of decorating for Christmas that reflects its rich history and Southern heritage. The city transforms into a festive wonderland with it’s historic streets adorned in elegant decorations. Charleston homes weave a tapestry of historical authenticity into their holiday decor, embracing timeless traditions with meticulously curated décor that aims to honor the Holy City’s history.

You'll likely find streets lined with traditional garlands, wreaths, and twinkling lights adorning the beautiful antebellum homes and historic buildings. The architecture itself becomes part of the decoration, enhancing the holiday spirit with its classic charm. The historic district, particularly areas like King Street and the Battery, often feature elaborate displays, festive window decorations, and storefronts dressed in holiday finery.

As you stroll along the cobblestone pathways of downtown, amidst the breathtaking historic homes, there's a captivating sight that catches the eye: the exquisite way these residences adorn themselves for the holidays. Don't expect grand inflatable figures or an explosion of vivid, multicolored lights. Instead, prepare to be charmed by the sight of meticulously crafted, often bespoke wreaths gracing nearly every front door, elegantly draped garlands made from lustrous magnolia leaves adorning entryways, and windows covered with meticulously placed wreaths. In the historic district, this display becomes a unifying signature across homes, almost as though they've orchestrated this collective elegance intentionally!

The charm lies in the uniformity, a testament to the timeless grace exuded by these homeowners who adhere to classic, refined decor. Amidst this seasonal transformation, there's an unspoken appreciation for the understated beauty—a nod to tradition and subtlety that deserves sincere admiration and recognition.

The piazzas in Charleston, adorned with seasonal decor, become captivating hubs of festive charm during the holiday season. These elevated verandas, draped with lush greenery, twinkling lights, and intricate decorations, add an extra layer of enchantment to the city's ambiance. However, it's not just about the visual spectacle; these adorned piazzas often serve as gathering spots for locals and visitors alike. Whether it's a cozy evening under softly lit canopies or a place to admire the intricate craftsmanship of the decorations, the piazzas add an inviting warmth to the holiday atmosphere, inviting people to come together and celebrate amidst the holiday craziness and festivities, reminding us all to slow down and take in the beauty of the season.

Moreover, Charleston hosts several events and festivals during the holiday season, such as parades, markets, and concerts. The atmosphere becomes quite lively with carolers, holiday markets selling local crafts and treats, and various seasonal activities that add to the overall festive vibe.

The city's blend of historic charm, Southern hospitality, and festive decor creates a magical Christmas ambiance that captures the essence of the holiday season in a uniquely Charleston way.

Mount Pleasant receives nearly $16M to help reduce transportation-related deaths

MOUNT PLEASANT — A federal grant of nearly $16 million will fund 17 transportation projects in Mount Pleasant within the next five years.The town received the $15.78 million grant on Dec. 15. It came from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Safe Streets and Roads for All program.Mount Pleasant is one of 385 recipients and one of 48 to receive an Implementation Grant. The grants were awarded for projects that aim to reduce or eliminate transportation-related fatalities.Mount Pleasant will use the money on ...

MOUNT PLEASANT — A federal grant of nearly $16 million will fund 17 transportation projects in Mount Pleasant within the next five years.

The town received the $15.78 million grant on Dec. 15. It came from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Safe Streets and Roads for All program.

Mount Pleasant is one of 385 recipients and one of 48 to receive an Implementation Grant. The grants were awarded for projects that aim to reduce or eliminate transportation-related fatalities.

Mount Pleasant will use the money on projects to improve safety on various road segments and to create intersection upgrades and non-motorized enhancements, such as creating multi-use paths and improving public transit stops.

James Aton, deputy director of capital projects and transportation, said the grant is funding projects laid out in the town’s Safety Action Plan, which was finalized in June. The plan outlines ways to improve segments of roads that are designated as high-frequency or high-severity crash sites.

“Through the Safety Action Plan development, we’ve looked at five-plus years of safety crash data both from a frequency standpoint and from severity,” Aton said. “You can have a low-frequency rate but high severity, like head-on collisions, sideswipes that are more prone to injury-provoking collisions.”

Mount Pleasant reported 15 fatal crashes between 2018 to 2022. Of those fatalities, five involved a pedestrian or bicycle. Roughly 20 percent of those crashes, injury crashes, and pedestrian and bicycle crashes occurred within or adjacent to the town’s settlement communities, historic African American communities that are often not incorporated into the town.

Aton said the plan highlights these communities as ones that can benefit from additional infrastructure improvements.

The grant allows funding for improvements for up to 20 bus stops in town. The town will work with the Charleston Area Regional Transportation Authority to construct bus shelters and install lighting, trash and bike facilities at bus stops near settlement communities, and major activity centers. Mount Pleasant has roughly 100 bus stops, though only 15 have shelters that provide cover from the weather, Aton said.

A resolution supporting a change to the way South Carolinians elect local officials failed this week to gain traction among Charleston City Council members.

At his final council meeting on Dec. 19, outgoing Mayor John Tecklenburg introduced the resolution that calls on the state’s Legislature to add instant runoff, or ranked-choice, voting as an alternative to current election methods.

Ranked-choice voting eliminates the need for separate runoff elections by allowing voters to rank candidates on their first visit to the polls. If no candidate has a majority of ballots casts, the lowest vote-getter is eliminated and those votes go to the candidate ranked second. The process continues until one candidate reaches a majority.

“I want to make clear that we’re not approving instant runoff voting at all,” Tecklenburg said ahead to the vote. “We’re just asking the Legislature to give us that as an additional option and in the event that they decide to pass that on the state level, then a future mayor and a future council would have to make a decision as to whether we want it or not. We’re just asking for it as an option.”

The change would require a change in state law, and then municipalities would have to opt in. Opposing bills, one calling for ranked-choice voting and another banning it, have been introduced in the state Legislature.

“Instant runoff voting is a great way to not only reduce runoff elections, save taxpayer dollars, increase voter turnout and make out democracy more representative of everyone in it, but I would also urge you to consider that instant runoff voting is a way to make our elections calmer,” said Leslie Skardon, who represents the League of Women Voters, at the Dec. 19 meeting.

Three others spoke in favor of the resolution during the public comment period. There was no opposition.

Last month, Tecklenburg lost his bid for a third term as mayor of the state’s largest city in a runoff against William Cogswell. It cost taxpayers over $110,000, on top of the $200,000 price tag of the initial election two weeks earlier, and saw fewer voters participate. When asked, the outgoing mayor has said had ranked-choice voting been an option, he didn’t believe it would have changed the outcome.

Tecklenburg was joined by council members Jason Sakran, Karl Brady and Ross Appel backing the measure. But six council members voted against it: Boyd Gregg, Kevin Shealy, William Gregorie, Perry Waring, Michael Seekings and Peter Shahid.

Palmetto Politics

Councilman Robert Mitchell abstained. Absent were Councilwoman Caroline Parker and Councilman Stephen Bowden, who had logged into the meeting virtually left early.

The meeting was also the last for Sakran and Shahid, who were each honored for their service to the city, as was Tecklenburg.

A Wisconsin man who claims he was to serve as interim chief of schools for Charleston County is suing the district for breach of contract and negligent misrepresentation, according to a lawsuit filed here.

Daryl Burns, the deputy chief of high schools for the Racine, Wis., Unified School District, which is the same district former Charleston County School District Superintendent Eric Gallien hailed from, is suing the district for failing to honor an employment agreement offered in July.

A letter Gallien sent to Burns on July 18 confirmed Burns’ assignment as interim chief. Burns was anticipated to serve in the temporary position through June 30, 2024, with an annual salary of $195,000.

Gallien reiterated in the letter the position was temporary and encouraged Burns to apply when and if the district made the role permanent.

Burns accepted, notified his employer he would be leaving the Racine school district and made plans to move his family to Charleston. He was excited about the “big move,” the complaint states, to meet new people and to learn a new system. He described a sense of “comfort” with CCSD.

Burns alleges in the complaint that Gallien, now-acting Superintendent Anita Huggins, Chief Human Resources Officer William Briggman and other district employees knew the offer had been sent to him in July, along with at least one school board member.

The complaint also states at least one board member knew Burns had accepted the offer.

CCSD spokesman Andy Pruitt said the letter of agreement Burn received was premature.

On May 18, the board decided the superintendent could not make any organizational changes without an explicit vote of the board. An effort on July 17 to rescind the motion and allow the superintendent to make organizational changes failed 4-5.

The letter sent to Burns was dated for the following day.

“The letter of agreement was premature as the board did not vote to approve the recommended unbudgeted position or the personnel appointment,” Pruitt said in a statement.

By August, the district had rescinded its offer, the lawsuit states. Burns was informed by CCSD that the employment agreement would not be honored.

In September, the school board voted 5-4 to suspend Gallien in a closed-door meeting and place him on administrative leave. Gallien filed his own lawsuit against the district for breach of contract in October.

In that lawsuit, he alleged the board did not allow him to hire two administrators he had worked with previously in Racine. Gallien’s and Burns’ employment in Wisconsin overlapped for about three years before Gallien was hired at CCSD, according to their LinkedIn profiles. He started as the local superintendent on July 1.

Gallien voluntarily dismissed his lawsuit on Oct. 27 after he and the school district reached a settlement. He accepted at least $350,000 in pay and other compensation in order to no longer serve as superintendent. At the same meeting, an investigation into a claim that he had created a hostile work environment — and which served as the basis for his suspension — found that he had done nothing wrong.

Burns’ lawsuit accuses the district of negligent misrepresentation and fraudulently intending to breach his contract by informing him there was an open position for interim chief of schools and offering him a contract knowing the position either did not exist or would not be filled.

The school district denies liability in the matter, Pruitt said.

Bring in the new year with one of these celebrations in Charleston

The countdown to 2024 is on and it’s not too early to secure your plans. If you want to be out on the town for New Year’s Eve + New Year’s Day, Charleston has lots of events and celebrations. Keep reading to explore some.New Year’s Eve - Sunday, Dec. 31New Year’s Eve Dinner | Times vary | Azur + Azur Events, 159 Market St., ...

The countdown to 2024 is on and it’s not too early to secure your plans. If you want to be out on the town for New Year’s Eve + New Year’s Day, Charleston has lots of events and celebrations. Keep reading to explore some.

New Year’s Eve - Sunday, Dec. 31

New Year’s Eve Dinner | Times vary | Azur + Azur Events, 159 Market St., Charleston | $85

Join Azur for a six-course, French-inspired New Year’s Eve Dinner. Enjoy menu items like champagne, Foie Gras, Caviar, A Harmonious St. Jacques Feuilleté, Frosty Parisian Delight.

New Year’s Eve at Aquarium Aglow | 5:30-9:30 p.m. | SC Aquarium, 100 Aquarium Wharf, Charleston | $34.95

You don’t have to be a night owl to enjoy this family-friendly party which features food, drinks, and animals.

The Wonderer Masquerade of Wonder | 9 p.m. | The Wonderer Charleston, 1705 Meeting Street Rd., Charleston | Prices vary

Immerse yourself in a night of enchantment and adventure under the stars. There will be indoor + outdoor themed areas and all-inclusive bars, light bites, three stages of live entertainment, aerialists + acrobatics, and more. The suggested attire is “dress to impress” with masks.

Sorelle New Year’s Eve Party | 9 p.m.-1 a.m. | Sorelle, 88 Broad St., Charleston | $175

Dance the night away with live music, passed canapés, and select beer, wine, and cocktails.

New Year’s Eve at the Alley | 9 p.m. | The Alley, 131 Columbus St., Charleston | $85

Enjoy a night of silent disco, music from DJ Phamtastik, free bowling + arcade games.

Studio 34 Disco Party | 9 p.m. | 34 West Theater Company. 200 Meeting St., Ste. 100, Charleston | $100

Take a step back into the 70’s and dazzle under the stage lights. This experience includes an open bar, local + curated bites and sweets, prizes and live music from DJ KIMI, and a special appearance from DYSCO KNGZ.

NYE Midnight in Paris | 10 p.m-1 a.m. | Félix Cocktails et Cuisine, 550 King St., Charleston | $125

This soiree includes bites, specialty cocktails, a champagne toast, and a midnight balloon drop. Parisian chic attire is encouraged.

Sparkle + Swine | 9 p.m. | Farm Haus Butcher and Beer Garden, 604 Coleman Blvd. Mount Pleasant | $0-$250

Groove into 2024 listening to local Charleston Band, Hans Wenzel + special guests. There will also be complimentary party favors + champagne and specialty curator appetizer spreads

New Year’s Studio 71 Party | 8 p.m. | Islander 71, 80 41st Ave., Isle of Palms | $150

The evening will be filled with live music, an open bar, chef-curated food station, and a special “Studio 71” lounge. Reservations are encouraged but walk-ins are accepted.

New Years Day

2024 Dunleay’s Polar Plunge | Jan. 1 | 2 p.m. | Dunleavy’s Pub, 2213 Middle St., Sullivan’s Island

Start your new year with a great cause, the Special Olympics South Carolina

Polar Plunge Party | Jan. 1 | 10 a.m. | Paradiso Charleston, 4401 McCarthy St., North Charleston

Plunge at the hotel pool for a refreshing dive into the new year. Afterward, guests can warm up by the fire pits and treat themselves with cocktails at the Bloody Mary station.

Why Mount Pleasant does not have plans to reschedule its Christmas parade

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – One of the Lowcountry’s largest Christmas parades was cancelled Sunday due to the threat of severe weather.Mount Pleasant’s annual Christmas Light Parade, which boasts a nighttime display of dazzling lights as bands, businesses, and friendly faces march along Coleman Boulevard, was called off out of an abundance of caution ...

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – One of the Lowcountry’s largest Christmas parades was cancelled Sunday due to the threat of severe weather.

Mount Pleasant’s annual Christmas Light Parade, which boasts a nighttime display of dazzling lights as bands, businesses, and friendly faces march along Coleman Boulevard, was called off out of an abundance of caution during the early afternoon because the forecast called for heavy rain and gusty winds.

Organizers previously said in their messaging to participants that the parade had yet to be cancelled in more than 20 years, and the plan was to proceed despite the rain unless weather became a public safety issue.

“In light of the weather conditions predicted and in speaking with our partners at the National Weather Service, local meteorologists, and the Town’s Emergency Management and Resilience Officer, Town officials determined that cancelling the event is the responsible course of action to ensure the safety of everyone involved. The safety and well-being of our participants, spectators, and community members remain the top priority,” the town said in a message.

Residents, visitors, and town leaders have since expressed their disappointment the parade was cancelled and that there was no rain date selected. But there is a reason for that.

Mount Pleasant town leaders said rescheduling the parade is not feasible. They begin getting applications for floats in September, and vendors that are brought in to help with floats, light towers, and other vital equipment come in from across the state.

Those same vendors are already booked up for other holiday festivities in the coming days.

Town leaders also say it’s a massive undertaking to schedule enough first responders to shut down streets, direct traffic, and keep everyone safe – especially as Mount Pleasant continues to be one of the fastest-growing cities in our area.

To reschedule the event would have come with an additional nearly $30,000 price tag.

Those working to make the parade happen every year said there is no one more disappointed than they are.

“We do our best … but you know God controls it, and so every once and a while you just get changes, and so we wait as long as we can. Everybody was watching the weather, and we were getting emails all week long. By the time we called the parade on Sunday, one-fifth of our entries had already dropped out,” said Nicole Harvey and Tracey Richter, who work for the Town of Mount Pleasant.

Said Nicole Harvey and Tracey Richter, who works for the Town of Mount Pleasant,

Looking ahead, they said there are plenty of holiday events still to come this week in the Town of Mount Pleasant, like visits with Santa Claus on Tuesday. The Mayor’s Music and Art Reception takes place Thursday at 4:30 p.m., and the Mount Pleasant Towne Centre has light displays every night.

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