Chiropractic Care in Mount Pleasant, SC

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At Mount Pleasant Spine & Disc Center, we offer our valued clients a wide range of chiropractic services that solve serious symptoms like:

Chiropractic Care Mount Pleasant, SC

Back Pain

Chiropractic Care Mount Pleasant, SC

Neck Pain

Chiropractic Care Mount Pleasant, SC

Headaches

Chiropractic Care Mount Pleasant, SC

Herniated Discs

Chiropractic Care Mount Pleasant, SC

Degenerative Disc Disease

Chiropractic Care Mount Pleasant, SC

Foot Pain

Chiropractic Care Mount Pleasant, SC

Whole Body Wellness

Chiropractic Care Mount Pleasant, SC

Nerve Pain

Chiropractic Care Mount Pleasant, SC

Sciatica

Chiropractic Care Mount Pleasant, SC

Lower Back Pain

Chiropractic Care Mount Pleasant, SC

"Arm and Hand Tingling

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Chiropractic Care Mount Pleasant, SC843-832-4499

If you are always in pain and have given up on your doctor's suggested therapies, we've got great news - a permanent solution to your back and foot pain may be closer than you might think.

As doctors and specialists, we hold true to our core values:

Always There for You

Always There for You

We want you to feel comfortable knowing that from your first visit, you will be treated with the care and compassion you would expect from a team of professionals.

Compassionate Doctors

Compassionate Doctors

At Mount Pleasant Spine & Disc Center, our doctors are not just experts. They're people, too, and understand how pain and back problems can be crippling. Our goal is to get you well as soon as possible, without drugs or surgeries. That way, you can get back to a normal, healthy living for years to come.

Premium Facilities

Premium Facilities

We pair cutting-edge technology with advanced chiropractic services like spinal decompression to get your life back on track.

Emergency Services

Pain Relief Services

If you find yourself in a situation where you need to see a chiropractor as soon as possible, we're here for you. Our chiropractors have treated thousands of patients, and we can treat you too.

Our office offers a robust range of chiropractic services in Mount Pleasant, from custom shoe insoles for your feet to adjustments and massages for your back.

Mount Pleasant Spine & Disc Center: Treating More Than Symptoms

Are you looking for a chiropractor in Mount Pleasant, SC who treats more than just symptoms? If you're sick of chiropractic services that aren't tailored to your needs and body, it's time to make a change. Our expert chiropractors at Mount Pleasant Spine & Disc Center focus on your needs, not an idealized version of you. From chiropractic adjustments to custom shoe inserts and spinal decompression, we have the services and treatments you need to live life to the fullest.

Ready to live your best life free of pain? Contact our office today or explore our site to learn more about the Mount Pleasant Spine & Disc Center difference. We want you to feel comfortable knowing that you will be treated with care, compassion, and excellence every time you visit our office.

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Latest News in Mount Pleasant, SC

Friday headlines: Hurricane Ian to thrash South Carolina today

Hurricane Ian, a storm reincarnated into a Category 1 threat, is expected to smash into the middle of South Carolina’s 187-mile coastline sometime this afternoon. It’s then predicted to head north through the Pee Dee.Winds are expected to pack an 85-mph-punch when it makes landfall. Officials say rains will be heavy at times, which may cause coastal flooding. As of 5 a.m. Friday, the center of this Category 1 hurricane was 140 miles south-southeast of Charleston.In other headlines:...

Hurricane Ian, a storm reincarnated into a Category 1 threat, is expected to smash into the middle of South Carolina’s 187-mile coastline sometime this afternoon. It’s then predicted to head north through the Pee Dee.

Winds are expected to pack an 85-mph-punch when it makes landfall. Officials say rains will be heavy at times, which may cause coastal flooding. As of 5 a.m. Friday, the center of this Category 1 hurricane was 140 miles south-southeast of Charleston.

In other headlines:

Domestic violence increased during pandemic, advocates say. Advocates say the pandemic increased the severity and cases of domestic violence as victims were forced to stay indoors with their abusers. Many feel it might grow again as Hurricane Ian approaches and locks everyone indoors.

Charleston airport flights canceled. Charleston International Airport canceled dozens of flights ahead of Hurricane Ian, including almost all flights after 6 p.m. United and Breeze airways have halted all flights until Oct. 1, while other airlines are expected to call off service. The Charleston Airforce Base, which operates the airport’s runways, plans to shut down runways when wind speeds reach 40 miles per hour.

Redevelopment plans revealed for former Cinebarre space. The former Cinebarre movie theater in Mount Pleasant is set to be redeveloped into two four-story office buildings and a parking deck. The buildings are planned to be used for medical and general use, while the backside of the property would be an 800-space parking deck.

Biden adjusts student loan forgiveness amid multiple lawsuits. The Biden administration has cut back its eligibility for those who can receive student loan forgiveness. Borrowers whose federal student loans are guaranteed by the government but held by private lenders will now be excluded, affecting nearly 770,000 people.

Restaurants in Charleston have a dishwasher problem. Many restaurants in the Charleston area are facing a dishwasher retention problem due to historically low wages and intense work detail. However, some restaurateurs, restaurant groups and locals have made moves to solve the problem.

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Here’s when Charleston could begin feeling impacts from Hurricane Ian

NOTICE! Please click here for updated information on Ian’s impacts and timing along the South Carolina coast. This story is no longer being updated.MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – Hurricane Ian strengthened to a Cate...

NOTICE! Please click here for updated information on Ian’s impacts and timing along the South Carolina coast. This story is no longer being updated.

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – Hurricane Ian strengthened to a Category 4 storm on Wednesday as it nears the western Florida coast. After making landfall near the Fort Myers area.

The storm is on track to move across the Florida peninsula through Thursday before moving back out over the Atlantic Ocean. Forecasters with the National Hurricane Center (NHC) say the storm could make another landfall somewhere near the Savannah, Georgia area on Friday, likely as a tropical storm.

Despite the shift in Ian’s forecast track, the impacts remain mostly the same for Thursday through early Saturday. Heavy rain, flooding, gusty winds, and a risk of tornadoes and waterspouts.

Peak wind gusts are expected to be between 40-50 mph for inland communities, and 60-70 mph for areas along the coastline Thursday night into Saturday morning.

Much of the Lowcountry could begin feeling impacts from Hurricane Ian by the evening on Thursday through early Saturday.

Storms Team 2 Meteorologist Josh Marthers said showers will begin setting up along the coast by sunset Thursday, increasing through the night as the center of Ian passes by Jacksonville, Florida, and closer to Georgia and South Carolina.

Heavy rain and rising tides will pose a threat Friday evening. “My concern for Friday is that there is a risk of significant flooding, particularly along the coast,” said Marthers.

Expected rain amount 4-6” of rain Thursday through Saturday “Most of this is going to start up late in the day Thursday, especially Thursday night into Friday,” said Marthers.

Marthers said there will be a section along the coast that could see 6-10” of rain, but most people will see 4-8” of rain.

Marthers said underneath the anticipated heavy rainfall will be rising tides. The National Weather Service has issued a Storm Surge Watch for the Charleston Metro, specifically Charleston County, late Thursday through early Saturday due to the risk of significant flooding.

“Thursday morning’s high tide is expected to produce major coastal flooding along the South Carolina coast, even without heavy rain,” said Marthers. “Significant flooding is expected with Friday’s midday high tide as heavy rain falls.”

A Hurricane Watch is in place for Charleston, coastal Colleton, and Berkeley Counties.

A Tropical Storm Warning is active for Georgetown County.

A Tropical Storm Watch is active for Dorchester, inland Colleton County.

A Storm Surge Warning is in place for Charleston and coastal Colleton counties.

Flooding rain: Thursday night through Friday evening

Significant coastal flooding: Thursday and Friday

High wind: Friday, especially along the coast

Tornadoes and waterspouts: Friday

Download the Storm Team 2 Hurricane Ready Guide for tips and important information you may need. You can also download the News 2 and Storm Team 2 apps for the latest weather and breaking news alerts.

Charleston area restaurants return to business as usual post-Hurricane Ian

Hurricane Ian, the first to make landfall in South Carolina since Matthew in 2016, left Charleston area restaurants largely unscathed. Most, including those located in flood-prone areas, were able to reopen first thing Oct. 1.Downtown Charleston’s Little Line Kitchen & Provisions at 176 Line St. reopened for breakfast Oct. 1, a mere 12 hours after large parts of Line Street — bookmarked by President Street and Ashley Avenue — were under water.The West Side daytime eatery did not see any obvious damage, own...

Hurricane Ian, the first to make landfall in South Carolina since Matthew in 2016, left Charleston area restaurants largely unscathed. Most, including those located in flood-prone areas, were able to reopen first thing Oct. 1.

Downtown Charleston’s Little Line Kitchen & Provisions at 176 Line St. reopened for breakfast Oct. 1, a mere 12 hours after large parts of Line Street — bookmarked by President Street and Ashley Avenue — were under water.

The West Side daytime eatery did not see any obvious damage, owner Wendy Gleim said, though she reported drain issues later in the day that could have been related to flooding.

Other peninsula restaurants returned to normal service less than 24 hours after Ian passed through Charleston.

Steps away from Little Line, Daps Breakfast & Imbibe reopened the morning after the storm.

A crew outside Melfi’s returned the restaurant’s sign to its normal hanging position after it was taken down as a precautionary measure. The restaurant was left unharmed, co-owner Brooks Reitz said.

Huger Street was another downtown thruway that found itself under water Sept. 30, but that didn’t stop Renzo, 384 Huger St., and Berkeley’s, at the corner of Huger Street and Rutledge Avenue, from reopening the following day.

A handful of Charleston area bars and restaurants decided to stay open during the storm, including Frannie & The Fox, Kwei Fei, Stems & Skins, Share House and Blind Tiger.

Matthew Conway, who owns The Tippling House wine bar with his wife Carissa, said he never consider closing. The couple and The Tippling House’s chef, Sean Clinton, live within walking distance of the wine bar, so Conway knew he could open without putting his staff in danger.

“It was by far our biggest food sales night ever,” said Conway, who eventually had to start turning people away by the end of the night. “Over my career I’ve found that those are the nights you can really bond with the community. Just the camaraderie you feel with the people that come in that night.”

Chef and restaurateur Nico Romo hoped to offer the same type of atmosphere for patrons at his new Summerville restaurant Laura. But shortly after bringing in his kitchen crew in the morning, he made the decision to close Laura, along with his other two restaurants — NICO Oysters + Seafood in Mount Pleasant and Bistronomy By Nico downtown.

“I didn’t know Summerville as well and I didn’t expect them to be as flooded,” Romo said.

It might be only one night, but the decision to close on a Friday was a big one for Romo and other Charleston restaurateurs. Especially ones that rely on local seafood (NICO) and house-made pasta (Laura).

“You don’t want to waste any product, and the product is already there,” Romo said. “You have to stay open as long as you can.”

The hardest hit of Romo’s restaurants was Bistronomy, which closes weekly on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

“So now (for) a five-day week, I’m already only getting sales for three days,” said Romo, who said he knows it could have been worse. “You’ve got to always look at the positive side. In some ways we take the risk to live on the coast.”

What impacts will Charleston see from Hurricane Ian?

NOTE: Information about impacts and timing for Hurricane Ian have been updated. Please click here to see the latest details as this story is no longer being updated. MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – Hurricane Ian ...

NOTE: Information about impacts and timing for Hurricane Ian have been updated. Please click here to see the latest details as this story is no longer being updated.

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – Hurricane Ian strengthened into a Category 3 storm before making landfall in La Coloma, Cuba early Tuesday morning. The storm will continue to intensify as it heads into the Gulf of Mexico where it’s expected to make a second landfall along Florida’s west coast, possibly as a Category 3 storm.

Here at home, all eyes will be on Ian later this week as it brings an increased risk of rain, gusty winds, flooding and isolated thunderstorms and tornadoes.

Forecasters with the National Weather Service (NWS) said the greatest impacts on our area will likely happen Thursday night into Saturday.

Rounds of moderate to heavy rainfall is likely Thursday night through Friday. Flooding is likely from localized heavy rainfall, especially in those low-lying and poor drainage areas. The greatest risk for excessive rainfall is near the coast.

Storm Team 2 is tracking two distinct possibilities for storm impacts across the Lowcountry over the next couple of days.

Scenario 1

Scenario 1 is a slightly inland track that would move the storm system into south Georgia and eventually into central South Carolina.

“If that’s the case, it’s going to give us flooding rain – several inches likely, coastal flooding because we’ll keep that on-shore wind, gusty wind with wind gusts up to 40 mph, and a tornado risk,” said Storm Team 2 Meteorologist Josh Mathers.

Scenario 2

Scenario 2 would be one that brings the storm a little more across the Florida peninsula and hugs the South Carolina coastline. Threats include heavy rain and coastal flooding.

Marthers said this track would lower our risk of tornadoes, but it would keep our heavy rain and coastal flooding threat intact.

“Either way, we’re not going to get out of this situation where we have to be concerned about flooding by Friday,” Marthers said. “We just have to see- does this go a little further inland, and if it does, that’s going to add a tornado threat to that flooding risk. If it goes a little further to our east and stays off the coast, that would be a lower tornado risk. Those are the details we’re trying to work out.”

Marthers said the probability of tropical storm force winds for our area has increased as well over the next five days. “We can see now in the Lowcountry its at a 30% to 40% probability, that would come in the form of a gust. I would not be surprised if a Tropical Storm Watch is issued Tuesday morning.”

The National Weather Service said tides could reach moderate to major coastal flood levels Thursday morning, that evening, and into Saturday. “Any rainfall that coincides with high tide will exacerbate coastal flooding,” NWS forecasters said.

High surf, dangerous rip currents and beach erosion are also a possibility.

Gusty winds – which could reach tropical storm force – will likely begin to develop Wednesday night through Friday. “Winds will be highest over the coastal waters and along the immediate coast. Gusty and saturated ground could contribute to localized downed trees.”

Isolated brief tornadoes and waterspouts are possible late Tuesday night into Friday.

Now is a good time to review your family’s hurricane plan and download the Storm Team 2 Hurricane Ready Guide for tips and important information you may need. You can also download the News 2 and Storm Team 2 apps for the latest weather and breaking news alerts.

Ian strengthens to Cat 1 hurricane off SC Coast: What to expect

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Ian strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane Thursday evening as it moves over the Atlantic towards the South Carolina Coast.After making landfall in Florida Wednesday and decimating much of the state, Ian weakened to a tropical storm.The National Hurricane Center said that as of 11:00 p.m. Thursday, Ian remained a Category 1 hurricane with 85 mile per hour winds and gusts of around 100 miles per hour, and was located about 185 miles south of Charleston.The Lowcountry began feeling Ian&rsquo...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Ian strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane Thursday evening as it moves over the Atlantic towards the South Carolina Coast.

After making landfall in Florida Wednesday and decimating much of the state, Ian weakened to a tropical storm.

The National Hurricane Center said that as of 11:00 p.m. Thursday, Ian remained a Category 1 hurricane with 85 mile per hour winds and gusts of around 100 miles per hour, and was located about 185 miles south of Charleston.

The Lowcountry began feeling Ian’s impacts Thursday in the form of strong winds and rising waters.

Friday morning and afternoon are expected to bring the most significant impacts, with four to eight inches of rain expected. High tide is at 11:41 a.m. Friday, which could be around the time Ian makes landfall in the Lowcountry.

The eye of the storm is currently on track to make landfall Friday afternoon near the Charleston Harbor or just to the north.

Serious flooding and storm surge is expected. Officials have urged those living in low-lying areas or barrier island to seek shelter on higher ground.

The National Hurricane Center said that “the deepest water will occur along the immediate coast near and to the right of the center, where the surge will be accompanied by large waves.”

Tornados and waterspouts could form during the overnight hours.

Strong winds are expected to cause significant issues overnight Thursday through Friday. Downed trees, power outages, and unsafe driving conditions are all serious possibilities.

Gusts of up to 45 miles per hour in Charleston, 60 miles per hour in Mount Pleasant, and 44 miles per hour more inland in places like Summerville could be seen Friday afternoon.

HURRICANE WARNING: Charleston County, coastal Colleton County, inland and tidal Berkeley County, Georgetown County, and Williamsburg County

TROPICAL STORM WARNING: Inland Colleton County and Dorchester County

STORM SURGE WARNING: Charleston County, coastal Colleton County, and coastal Georgetown County

Forecasters say power outages and downed trees are likely due to the excessive rainfall and gusty winds associated with Ian. Be sure to download the News 2 app to receive weather alerts, breaking news, and watch News 2 live on your phone if you lose power during the storm.

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