Chiropractic Care in Kiawah Island, SC

Ask Us Anything!

At Kiawah Island Spine & Disc Center, we offer our valued clients a wide range of chiropractic services that solve serious symptoms like:

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Back Pain

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Neck Pain

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Headaches

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Herniated Discs

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Degenerative Disc Disease

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Foot Pain

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Whole Body Wellness

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Nerve Pain

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Sciatica

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Lower Back Pain

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

"Arm and Hand Tingling

Much More

Call Us

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC843-832-4499

If you are always in pain and have given up on your doctor's suggested therapies, we've got great news - a permanent solution to your back and foot pain may be closer than you might think.

As doctors and specialists, we hold true to our core values:

Always There for You

Always There for You

We want you to feel comfortable knowing that from your first visit, you will be treated with the care and compassion you would expect from a team of professionals.

Compassionate Doctors

Compassionate Doctors

At Kiawah Island Spine & Disc Center, our doctors are not just experts. They're people, too, and understand how pain and back problems can be crippling. Our goal is to get you well as soon as possible, without drugs or surgeries. That way, you can get back to a normal, healthy living for years to come.

Premium Facilities

Premium Facilities

We pair cutting-edge technology with advanced chiropractic services like spinal decompression to get your life back on track.

Emergency Services

Pain Relief Services

If you find yourself in a situation where you need to see a chiropractor as soon as possible, we're here for you. Our chiropractors have treated thousands of patients, and we can treat you too.

Our office offers a robust range of chiropractic services in Kiawah Island, from custom shoe insoles for your feet to adjustments and massages for your back.

Kiawah Island Spine & Disc Center: Treating More Than Symptoms

Are you looking for a chiropractor in Kiawah Island, SC who treats more than just symptoms? If you're sick of chiropractic services that aren't tailored to your needs and body, it's time to make a change. Our expert chiropractors at Kiawah Island Spine & Disc Center focus on your needs, not an idealized version of you. From chiropractic adjustments to custom shoe inserts and spinal decompression, we have the services and treatments you need to live life to the fullest.

Ready to live your best life free of pain? Contact our office today or explore our site to learn more about the Kiawah Island Spine & Disc Center difference. We want you to feel comfortable knowing that you will be treated with care, compassion, and excellence every time you visit our office.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-832-4499

Free Consultation

Latest News in Kiawah Island, SC

Ian left a mess in SC coastal areas. Here’s what you need to know about cleanup rules.

People across South Carolina’s coast are tasked with cleaning up debris and beginning repairs caused by the high winds and rain Hurricane Ian brought to the Palmetto State on Sept. 30.Damage is still being assessed and municipalities are urging residents to check permit guidelines before beginning repairs.Nearly all damage-related repairs require building permits, which ensure work is performed up to code, according to the city of Charleston.Information on building permit guidelines and requirements can be found on...

People across South Carolina’s coast are tasked with cleaning up debris and beginning repairs caused by the high winds and rain Hurricane Ian brought to the Palmetto State on Sept. 30.

Damage is still being assessed and municipalities are urging residents to check permit guidelines before beginning repairs.

Nearly all damage-related repairs require building permits, which ensure work is performed up to code, according to the city of Charleston.

Information on building permit guidelines and requirements can be found on the city’s website.

At least 55 downed trees were reported in Charleston since Sept. 30. Crews will continue clearing public spaces, including roads, parks and playgrounds, throughout the recovery period, the city said. This includes street-sweeping efforts to clean residual mud off of roadways and sidewalks and clearing storm drains of debris.

Garbage and trash pickups, plus power restoration will vary.

Reports of storm-related damage can be made to individual municipalities or state and federal agencies. More specific information is listed below.

Berkeley County

Storm damage can be reported on the county’s website (berkeleycountysc.gov). Those without internet access can leave a voice message on the citizen call line at 843-719-4800. The call line will remain open through the morning of Oct. 3 for non-emergency calls only.

The landfill and convenience centers in Berkeley County reopened Oct. 1.

Charleston County

The county is continuing to assess damage from Ian. Residents can call 800-451-1954 to report damage to homes or property.

Although most roads are clear, people should still be mindful while driving. Limbs and trees could still be down in some areas.

City of Charleston

Residents should report damage online at www.charleston-sc.gov/report-damage or call 843-724-7311. A little more than 200 reports had been submitted online Oct. 1.

Residential garbage pickups will resume Oct. 3 on a normal schedule, but bulk trash collection will be suspended until Oct. 17. Any garbage that was not picked up on Johns Island on Oct. 1 will be collected Oct. 3, the city said in a news release.

Debris should be sorted based on the C.A.T. categories when placed on the curb for pickup:

C - Construction debris (building materials, drywall, lumber, carpet, furniture)

A - Appliances (refrigerators, washers/dryers, freezers, air conditioners, stoves)

T- Trees and vegetation (tree branches, leaves and logs)

A disaster recovery checklist for businesses can be found on the city’s website, along with other resources.

Dorchester County

By the early afternoon on Oct. 1, major roads in Dorchester County that had been blocked by flood waters or downed trees the day before were back open. Taking stock of damage, the county asked residents whose homes experienced damage to report it on their website (dorchestercountysc.gov), said public information officer Michelle Mills.

All Dorchester County convenience sites reopened Oct. 1, with the exception of the Oakbrook site at 235 Old Fort Drive.

The Oakbrook site will be closed until flooding subsides, the county said in a Facebook post.

The Sandy Pines (374 Sandy Pines Lane) and Miles Jamison Road (130 Suburban Lane) yard debris convenience sites will also be open from noon to 6 p.m. Oct. 2. Both sites accept vegetated debris.

Residents should contact their trash service for vegetative pickup or take it to the county’s convenience sites.

Damage reports

S.C. DHEC wants coastal residents to report damage to beachfront structures, including seawalls, revetments and dune walkovers through MyCoast: South Carolina, an online portal the agency uses to collect and analyze pictures and data about coastal events.

Submitted reports can help DHEC efficiently analyze post-storm beach conditions and expedite recovery activities, including permitting and other regulatory decisions.

Structural damage not near the coast can be reported on the S.C. Emergency Management Division’s mobile app, SC Emergency Manager.

Town of Kiawah Island

Residents can expect yard debris to be picked up on Oct. 6. Go to kiawahisland.org/services/garbage-collection/ for information about the town’s solid waste calendar.

Property damage should be reported to Bruce Spicher, Kiawah Island’s building official, at bspicher@kiawahisland.org.

This is a developing story. Check back for more.

Isabelle Altman contributed from Dorchester County.

Hurricane Ian Descends on South Carolina, Swamping Beachside Towns

The storm, which had pummeled Florida, made landfall again in South Carolina, but with less fury than it had earlier in the week.GEORGETOWN, S.C. — A resurgent Hurricane Ian slammed South Carolina on Friday, swamping the coast with its storm surge and pushing inland with heavy rainfall, howling winds and the threat of flash floods.For many South Carolina residents who had been unsettled by the scenes of devastation in Florida, Ian struck with less punch than some had feared. In South Carolina, its winds reached up to 85 m...

The storm, which had pummeled Florida, made landfall again in South Carolina, but with less fury than it had earlier in the week.

GEORGETOWN, S.C. — A resurgent Hurricane Ian slammed South Carolina on Friday, swamping the coast with its storm surge and pushing inland with heavy rainfall, howling winds and the threat of flash floods.

For many South Carolina residents who had been unsettled by the scenes of devastation in Florida, Ian struck with less punch than some had feared. In South Carolina, its winds reached up to 85 miles per hour, considerably less than the 150 m.p.h. power with which it had landed in Southwest Florida earlier in the week. But the storm was still potent enough to churn up a trail of damage and disruption as it swept northwest through South Carolina and into North Carolina.

Along the Grand Strand, the stretch of beach communities specking the South Carolina coast, people had to be plucked from flooded cars and buildings surrounded by water and piers had been swept into the ocean. In and around Myrtle Beach, videos shared on social media showed the storm surge overtaking the shoreline.

“I could see the waves and the water coming up,” Brenda Bethune, the mayor of Myrtle Beach, said of the view from her home across the street from the beach. “It was very intense.”

In many coastal communities, no evacuations had been ordered by the authorities, so residents either hunkered down or left on their own.

By Friday evening, meteorologists said the storm had weakened significantly and was no longer a hurricane. Still, the threat lingered as meteorologists warned that the storm could cause inland flooding and had tropical-storm strength winds.

The Aftermath of Hurricane Ian

“We expect drenching rain and sustained, heavy winds over most of our state,” Gov. Roy Cooper of North Carolina said in a briefing on Friday afternoon, noting that nearly 30,000 customers were without power in his state. Well over 100,000 customers had also lost electricity in South Carolina, officials there said.

Ian made landfall around 2 p.m. in Georgetown County, between Charleston and Myrtle Beach, with a storm surge of as much as seven feet, meteorologists said.

Brandon Ellis, the director of emergency services for Georgetown County, said the area was “really taking a beating.”

In Myrtle Beach, officials said the storm surge hit six feet, pummeling homes and businesses and eroding beaches. City officials received reports of downed power lines and cars stuck in floodwaters. Winds were said to have damaged some structures on the waterfront, the authorities said.

“It is a fast-moving storm, so that’s good,” said Travis Glatki, the city’s emergency manager. “We’re just holding strong.”

The South Carolina coast was the latest destination for Ian as it carved a swerving path through the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, knocking out electricity across Cuba and then blasting across Florida before making a loop in the Atlantic back toward South Carolina.

On Friday, officials in South Carolina urged residents to hunker down. But even before the worst of the storm arrived, some expressed what almost sounded like relief.

“This is not as bad as it could have been,” Gov. Henry McMaster of South Carolina said at a briefing on Friday afternoon, just as the storm was beginning to batter the coast. “A lot of prayers have been answered.”

Much of the concern had been directed at Charleston, the largest city in South Carolina, known for its well-preserved architecture, but also increasingly for its propensity to flood. Routine storms in Charleston often drop enough rain to make some neighborhoods difficult to navigate; lately, owners of some historic homes have been taking the costly and complicated step of having their homes hoisted several feet higher.

But as Ian approached, the predicted path shifted slightly north, sparing Charleston from the worst. After the storm passed on Friday afternoon, some roads were flooded and littered with tree limbs.

“We are without power, and the storm showed us a few leaky windows that need repair before the next storm, but I can’t complain,” Robert Grubbs, who lives in downtown Charleston, said.

Before this year, 44 tropical systems, including hurricanes, had made direct landfall along South Carolina’s 187-mile coast since 1851, according to state data. Hurricane Hugo, the Category 4 storm that was among the most powerful and destructive to hit South Carolina, made landfall in 1989 a little further south than Ian. Hurricane Matthew, a 2016 storm, hit South Carolina farther north on the coast.

Later on Friday, as the winds calmed along the coast and the sky settled to a dull gray, many were beginning to assess the extent of the impact.

On Pawleys Island, the floodwaters topped seven feet, submerging cars and filling the ground floors of houses propped on stilts. One couple had to be rescued from a flooded home.

“It was worse than we expected,” said Brian Henry, the mayor of Pawleys Island. “The extent to which it began to flood, with three hours left in high tide told me that we were going to be in trouble.”

In Georgetown, near where Ian made landfall, floodwaters submerged parts of Front Street, the city’s main shopping district. Boutiques and cafes were secured with sandbags and the floodwaters were a few feet deep at the street’s lowest point.

Patricia Devine-Harms, 61, the owner of the Purr & Pour Cat Cafe, trekked through the water in pink rain boots in the aftermath of the storm, taking pictures of the flooding to send to other merchants on the street.

“We are really fortunate,” she said. “We sit three feet up, so we just got a flooded garage and some waters percolating up in between the buildings.”

At The Beverley Beach House, a 25-room oceanfront hotel in Myrtle Beach, Corey Shaw, the general manager, said that the building’s roof had been damaged.

“I’ve seen way worse,” he said. “We’ll just mop it up in the morning, and get back to business as usual.”

Eliza Fawcett reported from Georgetown, Kellen Browning from Pawleys Island, S.C., and Rick Rojas from North Charleston, S.C. Trista Talton contributed reporting from Myrtle Beach, S.C.Livia Albeck-Ripka and Soumya Karlamangla also contributed reporting. Susan C. Beachy, Kitty Bennett and Kirsten Noyes contributed research.

47 UFO sightings reported in SC so far this year? Here’s where they’ve been seen the most

South Carolina residents have reported 47 sightings of unidentified flying objects across the state this year, according to the National UFO Reporting Center.While many people associate UFOs with alien visitors from other planets, the term refers to any aerial phenomenon that cannot be explained. Scientists and skeptic organizations routinely do eventually identify many reported UFOs as being more mundane in nature, such as atmospheric phenomena or man-made objects....

South Carolina residents have reported 47 sightings of unidentified flying objects across the state this year, according to the National UFO Reporting Center.

While many people associate UFOs with alien visitors from other planets, the term refers to any aerial phenomenon that cannot be explained. Scientists and skeptic organizations routinely do eventually identify many reported UFOs as being more mundane in nature, such as atmospheric phenomena or man-made objects.

Still, UFO reports persist.

So far this year, Irmo, Myrtle Beach and the Cross community are tied for most UFO sightings in the state so far this year. Each has three separately reported UFO encounters, according to the National UFO Reporting Center.

South Carolina isn’t the greatest hotbed for UFO reports in the U.S, but it is no slouch either, a recent study shows.

The study by myvision.org — a site that provides evidence-based information on eye health — analyzed the last five years-worth of reports from the National UFO Reporting Center. The study then ranked the states by most UFOs reported since 1974.

According to the study, South Carolina ranks 22nd among the states with 2,134 UFO reports.

The latest UFO was reported on Oct. 6 in Sumter. The report states that the witness was driving to meet friends around 10 p.m. and was on a straight road when he noticed two orange lights over a forest. The display lasted fur about 20 seconds.

“You tell me what I saw cause it was drifting in the sky and not like anything I’ve seen before,” the witness’ statement reads.

Another report made on Sept. 15 on Kiawah Island states that a woman and her husband were walking along the beach when they saw a reddish orange sphere in the sky that seemed to be moving, but then started hovering in place.

“It seemed the object we saw vaguely changed colors (red to orange to yellow to white), the object seemed to change shapes from three small close connected spheres to one large sphere,” the report reads.

The National UFO Reporting Center was founded in 1974 by noted UFO investigator, Robert J. Gribble, the organization’s website states. The center has processed more than 150,000 reports.

The center’s main function has been “to receive, record and to the greatest degree possible, corroborate and document reports from individuals who have been witness to unusual, possibly UFO-related events.”

Here is where all 47 UFO reports have been made in South Carolina so far this year, according to the reporting center.

7 Things to Do in Kiawah Island, South Carolina

Follow winding, oak-shaded roads 25 miles southwest of downtown Charleston's cobblestone streets and celebrated restaurant scene, and you'll find yourself on Kiawah Island. Carved by the Kiawah River on one side and fronting the Atlantic Ocean on the other, the barrier ...

Follow winding, oak-shaded roads 25 miles southwest of downtown Charleston's cobblestone streets and celebrated restaurant scene, and you'll find yourself on Kiawah Island. Carved by the Kiawah River on one side and fronting the Atlantic Ocean on the other, the barrier island is a true escape. Here, nature reigns supreme: ten miles of beaches roll out along the Atlantic; cicadas form their own sort of soundtrack; and lights-out is often determined by the sea turtles' nesting season. Even so, there's plenty to do for travelers who like their time in nature punctuated with good food, luxurious creature comforts, and a frozen drink in hand. Here are seven things to do in Kiawah Island, South Carolina.

Stay Like a Local

For access to all of Kiawah's amenities, from bike rentals to pools, you'll have to stay on the island. For an experience that's luxurious but unpretentious, book a room at The Sanctuary, an oceanfront hotel known for its five-star service and elevated onsite dining. For families who want a little room to spread out (or a kitchen), villa and home rentals are a smart choice; reserve through the resort directly, or book through a site like VRBO or Airbnb.

Spend a Day on the Sand

On the west end of the island, Beachwalker Park is Kiawah's only public beach access feels like a hidden gem, thanks to its wide, unspoiled expanses of sand. It offers the best of both worlds too: in addition to the ocean frontage, you can also score views of the Kiawah River here.

Hit the Links

Five state-of-the-art golf courses are open to the public. For avid fans of the sport, the Ocean Course alone makes Kiawah worth the trip. Host to two PGA Championships, the 18-hole course is not for the faint of heart. Raised above the dunes to capitalize on the expansive shore views, golfers are also subjected to ocean breezes (which don't exactly make for an easy or predictable trip around the green). Try Cougar Point for marsh views and a slightly less technical experience.

Go for a Cruise

One of the best ways to explore the island is to leave the car in park and take a beach cruiser for a spin (you can reserve them through the resort or bring your own). Between 30 miles of paved trails and 10 miles of hard-packed beach, there's no shortage of routes to explore. Ask for directions to the Marsh View Tower, an observation deck primed for birdwatching and soaking in the marsh and river scenery.

Visit Heron Park Nature Center

The naturalists here will school you in many of the species who call the island home, from bobcats and white-tailed deer to loggerhead sea turtles and American alligators. Sign up for a guided tour, like "Back Island Birding", "Marsh Kayaking," or "Ocean Seining and Beach Combing," or ask for their recommendations for the best nature-spotting places in the area.

Explore Freshfields Village

Built around a lush lawn, Freshfields Village has plenty of restaurants and shops to explore, plus a boutique stay, the Andell Inn. Pick up a beach read at Indigo Books; snag treats for your four-legged friends at Dolitte's; and gear up for island adventures SeaCoast Sports and Outfitters. Start the morning with coffee and a breakfast sandwich from Java Java; settle in for grilled cheese and a milkshake at retro Vincent's Drugstore & Soda Fountain; or cap off the day with house-made frosé from newly opened The Co-Op. Check their calendar for seasonal events, like summertime's "Music on the Green" concert series and farmer's market.

Venture to Bohicket Marina & Market

Make the short drive to neighboring Seabrook Island for a taste of the area's salty maritime culture. Snag a umbrella-shaded table on the upper deck at Salty Dog Café for fresh catch, a cold beer, and riverfront views of the boats coming and going from the marina.

Clever’s Guide to Table Setting Trends Through the Decades

The ritual of table setting is something of a long lost art. So many of us, myself included, are ignorant to the nuances of cooking and plating, forgoing it for the convenience of food delivery. Even so, I’ve found myself noting that nothing satisfies like a well-plated, well-cooked meal—ideally, one I’ve made myself. To offset my food ordering ways, I’ve decided to research all tha...

The ritual of table setting is something of a long lost art. So many of us, myself included, are ignorant to the nuances of cooking and plating, forgoing it for the convenience of food delivery. Even so, I’ve found myself noting that nothing satisfies like a well-plated, well-cooked meal—ideally, one I’ve made myself. To offset my food ordering ways, I’ve decided to research all that goes into the ideal tablescape. You read that right, tablescape.

In researching all the elements associated with table setting trends, I’ve uncovered different iterations of the perfect tablescape to figure out my own preferences. Though cheap cutlery certainly has its charm (especially when you’re on a budget), few things compare to a gracefully designed set, each piece of which sits ergonomically between your thumb and forefinger. And when you’ve finally cleared whatever home-cooked delicacies have awaited you, you’re greeted with another pleasant surprise: some beautifully crafted dishes, bone white or awash in playful motifs. Though the food has been great, the old adage “you eat with your eyes” seems to have proven itself, as the table settings have tied together another meal.

With a season full of dining, entertaining, and spending time with loved ones approaching quickly, I thought it was the perfect time to write a guide on table setting trends through the years.

1920s: Formal and Floral

In the 1920s, as you might imagine, “setting table” was quite the to-do. Dinner parties, or soirees, were held in magnificent mansions that were, in retrospect, harbingers for the coming economic downturn. No worries, though. Properly placed dishware would ensure the night went off without a hitch. And to be properly placed, in the 1920s, the dinner table had to be laid out in a very specific manner. Each guest’s eighteen-inch designated area was referred to as a cover. According to a 1929 article on table etiquette from the San Pedro News Pilot, each cover had a service plate in the middle, flanked by forks to the left and a knife and soup spoon to the right. In its proper placement, each piece of silverware would be exactly one inch from the edge of the table.

Transferware dishes brought provincial French toilé-style imagery to the American masses with ease. Though often seen in the classic blue-and-white colorway, many popular dishes at the time also had pastoral scenes in maroon red or dark golden brown. Coordinating silverware sets would be complete with beautiful floral scrollwork, another callback to the simpler times before America began its process of industrialization. Or maybe I’m looking too far into it.

1930s: Close to Home

The next decade loosened its tie a bit, as place settings became less formal and more welcoming and inviting. What seemed like an oxymoron before, “casual dinner party,” was now becoming a frequent occurrence for plenty of Americans. Even as the Great Depression set in, many people pooled together and had potlucks, where gathering around a communal table was a source of comfort and enjoyment rather than another stiff social event.

Instead of the somewhat stuffy and arguably pretentious toilés from 10 years prior, 1930s dishware allowed itself to be playful and graphic. The once ornate and elaborate flower motif was repurposed in primary colors and simple shapes. Imagery from the French countryside was out of style, and popular American dishes were decorated in scenes from contemporary domesticity—strawberries, sunshine-y skies, and potted plants, all in the confident hues from the Art Deco era.

With the growing popularity of Bakelite, many household objects—from jewelry to drawer pulls to flatware—were fashioned out of the cutting-edge plastic, instead of the bulky silverware from years before. Overall, the formality of American dinner tables had come into question as people had less money, time, and energy to spend on frivolous things.

1940s–1950s: Dining in the Cosmos

The ’40s and ’50s brought the nuclear family back into play. I mean, back then, what was better proof of success than a spouse, a couple kids, a picket fence, and a dog? So of course, after the war, when women were back in their roles as housekeepers, supper returned in a big way. Doilies, powdery pinks and blues, and grandmotherly silver contribute to a sense of delicate beauty that pervaded the late ’40s and early ’50s. It’s in this era that Samantha Picard, a London-based supper club host and tablescape aficionado, finds the most inspiration.

“I am loving reinventing the quintessential 1940s dining table in a more livened up, contemporary way,” Samantha says. “My grandmother gifted me some tabletop silver from 1940s and 1950s glassware when she recently downsized, and they’ve been a huge inspiration in my push to playing around with mixing old and new.”

Midcentury could be used as a catchall to describe this era of table setting. Arguably one of the most iconic dishware sets of the movement was the space-age inspired Starburst pattern by Franciscan China. But closer down to earth, the tablescapes of this era found their inspiration in handmade textiles and balmy pastel colors.

1960s-1970s: Fabulous Fungi

I’ve talked about it before and I’ll continue to talk about it: flower power. The 1960s and 1970s were an explosion of neon colors, trippy visuals, and, of course, botanical patterns. But what if I were to present another aesthetic movement that ran concurrently with flower power? What if I were to dub it the mushroom boom? Okay, I’m open to suggestions.

But among the acid green florals of the ’60s and ’70s, there were humble fungi, toadstools plopped on the floor of a friendly forest. Mushroom-festooned dishware was huge. In a nod to the 1930s, plastic flatware was back, and it had the sleek, space-age ’70s aesthetic of a Kubrick film. As the ’shroom boom fell into households all over the country, so too did its signature color scheme, the warm, earthy classics: burnt sienna, harvest gold, and avocado green.

1980s-1990s: Baroque Opulence

The trend of finding that warmth in interiors, from colors to textures, continued into the following years. The ’80s and ’90s kept a stronghold on sepias—think terracotta, beige, mahogany—and paired them with textiles like quilted fabric placemats and pops of salmon pink and ivory white. Though patterns in the ’80s tended on the smaller side, large-scale prints of botany and fruits dominated kitchen landscapes in the ’90s. It was around this time that we started to see tablescapes shift even further from the staid, boxiness of the ’20s.

Supper hosts accessorized their dining tables with jewelry-like accouterments like napkin rings and crystal tumblers. “The giant haute cuisine restaurants of 1980s New York were a prime 20th-century example of the Baroque opulence and decadence I can’t help but appreciate in a tablescape,” says Tara McCauley, a New York–based interior designer.

The focus of colors from the ’80s to the ’90s shifted from an emphasis on rich jewel tones to more muted, pastel-adjacent tones. The bold shades of 1980s Fiestaware softened as the years passed. Silverware became more heavy and sculpted, with priority towards the hand feel of the instrument as much as its appearance.

2000s-2010s: Sleek Minimalism

Once again, we didn’t seem to fully extricate ourselves from the earthy overtones of the American tablescape. The 2000s and 2010s decided to turn away from the folky leanings of the ’70s or the playfulness of the midcentury. Instead, this era was characterized by its sleek minimalism, a dovetailing of organic materials, plants, and imagery, all with a modern, refined sensibility. Supper was served on cream-colored, smoothly glazed dishes, cups were dimple-blown glass, and flatware was streamlined in design, intuitively designed with very few aesthetic embellishments.

2020s: All About Aesthetics

Today’s table settings are a pastiche of previous years combined with present-day trends. Full dish sets are seemingly impossible to find in this day and age, which has left many of us cobbling together mismatched but well-loved arrays of plates and bowls for our guests. Anchor Hocking glasses, a mainstay on American tables for decades, line the insides of my cupboards, from sunshine and sailboat patterns to hearts and stripes. Beneath a well-coiffed bouquet of flowers, the present-day tablescape is expressive and moody, drawing inspiration from the 20th century and beyond.

“When I was 16, I took a painting class during which the teacher would exclaim ‘Pay attention to the chiaroscuro!’ on a near daily basis, and that little reminder always pops into my mind when thinking of how the lighting in a dark setting will play against the servingware and fabrics I choose for a table setting,” Tara recalls. “I’m particularly inspired by Italian Baroque and Dutch golden age paintings. I love recreating the romantic glow and organic imperfection of, say, a Caravaggio interior scene or a Vermeer still life by setting the table with clusters of ivory taper candles interspersed with real fruits or smaller floral arrangements which coordinate with the centerpiece.”

These days we’re hearkening yesteryear’s trends and choosing not to overlook table settings. Once seemingly obsolete objects, such as egg cups and gravy boats, have found their way into the hearts of 2022’s tablescape enthusiasts. With a wealth of resources at our disposal, today’s table setters have approaches that are simultaneously modern and traditional. The play of light in a supper setting has more significance than it did in the past—dripping, warm candle light is much more on-trend today than it was one hundred years ago. And with our cameras (both phone and film) at the ready, prepared to snap a picture for the ’gram, we’ve made sure to return to our roots of beautiful presentation. After all, when we’ve finished eating with our mouths, our eyes will still be hungry.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

Office Hours

  • Mon – 8:00am to 12:00pm – 2:00pm to 6:00pm
  • Tue – 2:00pm to 6:00pm
  • Wed – 8:00am to 12:00pm – 2:00pm to 6:00pm
  • Thu – 8:00am to 12:00pm – 2:00pm to 6:00pm
  • Fri – 8:00am to 12:00pm

Service Areas

Copyright by summervillespineanddisc 2021. All rights reserved.