Chiropractic Care in Kiawah Island, SC

Ask Us Anything!

At Kiawah Island Spine & Disc Center, we offer our valued clients a wide range of chiropractic services that solve serious symptoms like:

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Back Pain

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Neck Pain

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Headaches

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Herniated Discs

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Degenerative Disc Disease

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Foot Pain

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Whole Body Wellness

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Nerve Pain

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Sciatica

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

Lower Back Pain

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC

"Arm and Hand Tingling

Much More

Call Us

Chiropractic Care Kiawah Island, SC843-832-4499

If you are always in pain and have given up on your doctor's suggested therapies, we've got great news - a permanent solution to your back and foot pain may be closer than you might think.

As doctors and specialists, we hold true to our core values:

Always There for You

Always There for You

We want you to feel comfortable knowing that from your first visit, you will be treated with the care and compassion you would expect from a team of professionals.

Compassionate Doctors

Compassionate Doctors

At Kiawah Island Spine & Disc Center, our doctors are not just experts. They're people, too, and understand how pain and back problems can be crippling. Our goal is to get you well as soon as possible, without drugs or surgeries. That way, you can get back to a normal, healthy living for years to come.

Premium Facilities

Premium Facilities

We pair cutting-edge technology with advanced chiropractic services like spinal decompression to get your life back on track.

Emergency Services

Pain Relief Services

If you find yourself in a situation where you need to see a chiropractor as soon as possible, we're here for you. Our chiropractors have treated thousands of patients, and we can treat you too.

Our office offers a robust range of chiropractic services in Kiawah Island, from custom shoe insoles for your feet to adjustments and massages for your back.

Kiawah Island Spine & Disc Center: Treating More Than Symptoms

Are you looking for a chiropractor in Kiawah Island, SC who treats more than just symptoms? If you're sick of chiropractic services that aren't tailored to your needs and body, it's time to make a change. Our expert chiropractors at Kiawah Island Spine & Disc Center focus on your needs, not an idealized version of you. From chiropractic adjustments to custom shoe inserts and spinal decompression, we have the services and treatments you need to live life to the fullest.

Ready to live your best life free of pain? Contact our office today or explore our site to learn more about the Kiawah Island Spine & Disc Center difference. We want you to feel comfortable knowing that you will be treated with care, compassion, and excellence every time you visit our office.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-832-4499

Free Consultation

Latest News in Kiawah Island, SC

The 20 best golf courses in South Carolina (2022/2023)

The 18th hole at Kiawah Island's Ocean Course.As part of GOLF’s course rating process for 2022-23, our fleet of 100-plus expert panelists identified the best golf courses in South Carolina. Browse the links below to check out all of our course rankings, or scroll down to see the best courses in South Carolina.GOLF’s other course rankings: ...

The 18th hole at Kiawah Island's Ocean Course.

As part of GOLF’s course rating process for 2022-23, our fleet of 100-plus expert panelists identified the best golf courses in South Carolina. Browse the links below to check out all of our course rankings, or scroll down to see the best courses in South Carolina.

GOLF’s other course rankings: Top 100 Courses in the World | Top 100 Courses in the U.S. | Top 100 Courses You Can Play | Top 100 Value Courses in the U.S. | America’s Best Municipal Courses | The 100 Best Short Courses in the World

SYMBOL GUIDE1 = Top 100 Course in the U.S.P = Public/Resort CourseV = Top 100 Value Course in the U.S.M = Top 30 Municipal Course in the U.S.

Ed. note: Some courses were omitted from our rankings because they did not receive enough votes.

1. Kiawah Island – Ocean Course (Kiawah Island) [1, P]

The blend of tidal marshes, scrub-topped dunes, live oaks and the soothing sound of the Atlantic on every hole make this one of the South’s most memorable playing experiences. Though the course just turned 30 years old, it already has an illustrious history of hosting big-time events, none more memorable than the drama-filled 1991 “War by the Shore” Ryder Cup. Much more short grass has been added around the green complexes since then and now the design is more thought-provoking rather than terror-inducing. Many of its greens are plateaued, with some of the more pronounced coming on the 3rd, 11th and 14th holes. Phil Mickelson more than handled the putting surfaces on his way to his historic win at the 2021 PGA Championship.

2. Yeamans Hall (Hanahan) [1]

Marrying classic Seth Raynor design with coastal South Carolina topography, Yeamans presents a charming tour of Redan, Biarritz and Road holes woven through marshland and magnificent live oaks. Over the years, the course’s original wonder faded as bunkers grew in and green complexes shrank. But a two decade-long renovation based on Raynor’s original property maps — discovered in the clubhouse attic — has returned this Golden Age masterpiece to its original brilliance.

3. Harbour Town (Hilton Head Island) [1, P]

The professionals weren’t sure what to make of Harbour Town when they first tangled with it in 1969. Unlike other courses built in that timeframe, this design by Nicklaus and Dye didn’t rely on length as much as it did in demanding accuracy off the tee as the golfer shaped shots around live oaks and stately pines. Precise iron play on the uniquely configured greens was also a must. But soon pros found standout holes abound, including the V-shaped green at the short 9th and the finishing stretch from 13 in. Pete and Alice Dye’s trip to Scotland in the mid-1960s proved the genesis for bulwarking the 13th green with railroad ties. Even 50+ years after the course opened, Harbour Town’s exemplar holes remain as compelling and interesting as anything modern architecture has to offer.

4. Congaree (Ridgeland) [1]

The number of par-4s on a course generally outnumber its par-5s and par-3s, and as such, go a long way in defining a course’s quality. The better the range of such holes, the better the course. From two of Fazio’s all-time finest short two-shotters (the 3rd and 15th) to some of his best long ones (the 6th, 11th and 17th) this design excels. Layer on the club’s desire for the fastest, firmest playing surfaces possible and the course flourishes.

5. Palmetto GC (Aiken) [1]

One of the great starts to the game with a series of diverse two-shotters leading the golfer well away from the Stanford White clubhouse. Each green is so good, and no surprise why: Alister MacKenzie lent a hand to them when he was working in neighboring Augusta. Picking favorite holes is difficult in the wake of Gil Hanse’s excellent restoration. Two of the best, though, are the one-shot 7th, with its shelf green reminding many of the 6th at Royal Dornoch, and the par-5 14th, which falls downhill in the most appealing manner imaginable. The finish is fascinating, too, with a couple of short par-4s in the final four. That works at Prestwick in Scotland, and it works here too.

6. Long Cove (Hilton Head Island)

7. Chechessee Creek (Okatie)

8. Secession (Beaufort)

9. CC of Charleston (Charleston)

10. Sage Valley (Graniteville)

11. May River – Palmetto Bluff (Bluffton) [P]

12. The Dunes (Myrtle Beach) [P]

13. Kiawah Island – River (Kiawah Island) [P]

14. Bulls Bay (Awendaw)

15. Caledonia (Pawleys Island) [P]

16. Kiawah Island – Cassique (Kiawah Island) [P]

17. Greenville – Chanticleer (Greenville)

18. Camden (Camden)

19. Old Tabby Links (Okatie)

20. Musgrove Mill (Clinton)

For GOLF’s course rankings lists, each panelist is provided a list of hundreds of courses and “buckets,” or groupings. If they believe the course to be among the best in its category (World, U.S. Value, etc.), they check the corresponding box to place it in a specific bucket. Panelists are also free to write in courses they felt should have been included on the ballot. Points were assigned to each bucket; to arrive at an average score for each course, we divide its aggregate score by the number of votes. From those point tallies, the courses are then ranked accordingly.

The key to the process is the experience and expertise of our panel. Hailing from 15 nations and all the worldwide golf meccas, each of our 115 handpicked panelists has a keen eye for architecture, both regionally and globally. Many of our panelists have played more than 1,000 courses in 20-plus countries.

Because we don’t prescribe a set method to assess courses as other ranks do, no one opinion carries the day — our rank is a democracy. Some panelists believe that enjoyment is the ultimate goal, and thus prioritize design attributes such as width and playing angles, while frowning on upon having to constantly hunt for balls in thick rough. Other panelists value challenge and the demands of hitting every club in the bag. Still others consider a course’s surroundings and overall environment of paramount importance, thereby emphasizing the setting and naturalness of the course. In the end, allowing raters to freely express their tastes is what produces the desired eclecticism in our Top 100 lists.

Larger supermarket proposed to replace Harris Teeter between Kiawah and Seabrook islands

A longtime supermarket that serves shoppers of Kiawah, Seabrook and Johns islands could be relocated and enlarged under proposed plans.The existing 38,000-square-foot Harris Teeter Village Market grocery store could expand to nearly 54,000 square feet in a newly built store as part of a proposed retail development on a nearly 22-acre parcel behind the existing Freshfields Village Shopping Center.Property owner Riverstone Properties LLC of Richmond, Va., wants to rezone the undeveloped site on Kiawah Island Parkway from low-dens...

A longtime supermarket that serves shoppers of Kiawah, Seabrook and Johns islands could be relocated and enlarged under proposed plans.

The existing 38,000-square-foot Harris Teeter Village Market grocery store could expand to nearly 54,000 square feet in a newly built store as part of a proposed retail development on a nearly 22-acre parcel behind the existing Freshfields Village Shopping Center.

Property owner Riverstone Properties LLC of Richmond, Va., wants to rezone the undeveloped site on Kiawah Island Parkway from low-density residential use to a commercial planned development. The Charleston County Planning Commission recently deadlocked 4-4 on changing the land use and the effort failed.

County spokeswoman Kelsey Barlow said the commission only makes recommendations. The proposed change will now be considered by County Council’s Planning and Public Works Committee on March 16.

Representatives of Riverstone Properties, which is affiliated with the owner of Kiawah Island Golf Resort, and Harris Teeter did not respond to requests for comment on the plans.

Planning commission member Logan Davis said developers indicated at an earlier meeting one reason the supermarket chain wants to relocate to a larger store is so the grocer will have better entry and exit space for deliveries.

Some planning board members wanted a new traffic study while others were concerned about a lack of clarity for the proposed connection to Freshfields Village. The shopping center is owned by Columbia-based Edens, which paid nearly $125 million for the property in June.

One board member expressed concerns that the connection to Freshfields appeared to be near the entrance to a convenience store off Hedgerow Lane and he was worried about the connection across a planted median on Freshfields Drive. He preferred a different connection point.

The development would allow drive-thrus for a pharmacy but not fast food under the current proposal.

The property proposed to be developed most recently was used as a parking area for people attending the PGA Championship Tournament at the Ocean Course on Kiawah Island in 2021.

Site plans also show 10,000 square feet of retail space set aside for future expansion of Harris Teeter and 10,000 additional square feet of other retail space on the opposite side of the planned grocery store.

Another 46,400 square feet of retail space would be clustered in seven smaller buildings while a gas station also is part of the site plan.

Chris Corrada of Riverstone Properties told commission members the fuel site would be set 100 feet off of Kiawah Island Parkway and would be buffered by trees and other foliage.

An additional entryway into the site is planned off the parkway. No homes are being proposed for the property.

Note: This story has been updated with a new date for the proposal to be considered by County Council’s Planning and Public Works Committee.

Dolphins along the beaches and up the creek, get to know these Myrtle Beach locals.

Bottlenose dolphins may be Myrtle Beach’s most popular residents.Visitors to Grand Strand beaches can often see these marine mammals cruising through the waves, performing acrobatics and surfing boat wakes. They even move well up our tidal creeks and waterways. Here’s what you should know about these playful animals.Feel at home in Myrtle BeachMyrtle Beach is not your average beach town. Sign up for our Guide to the Myrtle Beach Area and get all of the information you need to become a local. Whether you are...

Bottlenose dolphins may be Myrtle Beach’s most popular residents.

Visitors to Grand Strand beaches can often see these marine mammals cruising through the waves, performing acrobatics and surfing boat wakes. They even move well up our tidal creeks and waterways. Here’s what you should know about these playful animals.

Feel at home in Myrtle Beach

Myrtle Beach is not your average beach town. Sign up for our Guide to the Myrtle Beach Area and get all of the information you need to become a local. Whether you are new to town or you would like to fall in love with Myrtle Beach again, we have everything you need.

Dolphins were spotted off the Grand Strand coast at Huntingdon State Park. By Deb Milie Hunger

Dolphins can be seen consistently throughout the year in along the South Carolina coast, according to Lauren Rust, executive director of the Low Country Mammal Marine Network. This group studies the animals in hopes of protecting resident populations.

Rust says that they observe three different populations of common bottlenose dolphins, Scientific name: Tursiops truncates, along the South Carolina coast: resident, coastal, and migratory dolphins. Because South Carolina water remain relatively warm, and there is an abundance of prey near our coasts, all three populations may be seen much of the year.

But, in the colder months, the coastal and migratory dolphins tend to chase their migrating prey down the Atlantic coast leaving only the resident dolphins behind.

During the winter months, Myrtle Beach area social media sites are abuzz with reports of dolphins in the inland waterways of Little River, Hog Inlet, Murrells Inlet, Pawleys Island and sometimes even well up the Waccamaw River.

Erin Weeks of the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources explains that one of the mammal’s favorite foods is red drum, locally known as “Spottail Bass”, and that the fish tend to school in the shallower, and thus, warmer waters of our tidal marshes.

Resident dolphins come up our waterways seeking those tasty treats. When local fishermen hear the tell-tale PUFFGH! sound of the mammals coming up for air, and see their v-shaped wake coming up shallow creeks, most know just to put down their fishing rods and watch. There is just no competition with these voracious predators.

Rust explained that while dolphins are less plentiful during the winter months, sightings are still frequent because the animals are on the move seeking meals that are harder to come by during the colder season.

The Low Country Marine Mammal Network has studied a behavior among resident dolphins known as “strand feeding” that seems to be unique to the Carolina and Georgia coasts. The animals work together to corral schools of fish and push them, and much of their bodies, up onto the beaches and mud flats of local marshes to gather the fish in their mouths before sliding back down into deeper water.

It’s a spectacular display that is rarely witnessed but leaves a lasting impression.

Rust says that the behavior is so rare that they’ve only found about ten locations where “strand feeding” occurs and that this hunting method seems to be passed down from mother to calf only within specific family units.

As our waters tend to be clearer in Winter, and the dolphins come in close, it is an ideal time to get a good look at these fascinating creatures.

Rust says that the same resident dolphins, often with distinguishing marks, can be seen repeatedly in the same areas. In the Charleston areas, many of the local creatures have been named, photographed and tracked by experts and admirers.

But Rust warns that watchers should keep their distance.

The federal Marine Mammals Protection Act prohibits feeding and harassing marine mammals and requires boaters to stay at least 50 yards away.

When dolphins get too accustomed to human activity, boat strikes are more likely and feeding the animals may change their prey habits and keep them from being able to feed themselves. The South Carolina Department of natural resources provides these tips to be ‘dolphin friendly’ in South Carolina.

Not In The Market For A Second Home? Exclusive Resorts Allows You To Vacation In The World’s Best Residences

Since the pandemic began nearly three years ago, the demand and interest in secondary or tertiary vacation homes has steadily increased. Remote work and school have made it easier to work from anywhere, thus allowing people to operate from wherever they want—as long as there’s a Wi-Fi connection. But as we look to 2023, ...

Since the pandemic began nearly three years ago, the demand and interest in secondary or tertiary vacation homes has steadily increased. Remote work and school have made it easier to work from anywhere, thus allowing people to operate from wherever they want—as long as there’s a Wi-Fi connection. But as we look to 2023, reports show it’s the worst time to buy a house in decades. Luxury home sales plummeted by 38%, likely due to inflation, a deteriorating stock market and fears of a recession.

For those who aren’t in the market to purchase a home might find a more economical solution in travel clubs that own and invest in luxury residences for its members. Membership-based travel clubs are nothing new, but in pandemic-ridden times, they’ve become more sought-after for their variety of properties and offerings across the globe as an alternative to the cost and hassles of owning a home. Exclusive Resorts, founded in 2002 and owned by former AOL executive Steve Case, is a private membership-based vacation club and also one of the world’s largest owners of real estate. The company operates similar to a country club, with a one-time initiation fee of $175,000 for a 10-year commitment and yearly dues depending on your membership plan. The benefit is that daily rates always stay the same for members, even at peak times.

“Second homes often seem like great investments—something you will use frequently with family and friends while it appreciates in value,” Case tells Forbes. “But what often happens is that you use it less than expected and are surprised by the expense and hassle of owning another property. We realized that our company addressed this tension for a large segment of travelers. This is even more true now as the pandemic has shifted the way we want to travel, and where and how we spend time with our families and work.”

Exclusive Resorts has roughly 4,300 members and welcomes around 200 members per year. They own and operate more than 350 private residences and villas in over 75 destinations (and counting) and team up with major brands, like Rosewood and Four Seasons, to purchase residences that members then vacation at. To date, Exclusive Resorts has purchased over $1 billion in real estate.

Sara Whitford, general counsel and senior vice president of real estate at Exclusive Resorts, echoes Case, saying: “The fact of the matter is that buying, building and furnishing a second home is a real headache for people. We are looking at one of the most difficult real estate markets that there has been, certainly in recent memory. You're looking at historically high interest rates that just continue to rise. On top of that, most sellers haven’t adjusted their prices even though the market has sold. There are also many costs and difficulties in managing a home.”

Some of the company’s most popular destinations include Peninsula Papagayo in Costa Rica; Dominican Republic; Kiawah Island in South Carolina; Sea Island in Georgia; Nevis in the Caribbean; Deer Valley, Utah; and Colorado, among others. However, the Denver-based company has residences throughout North America, Europe, the Middle East, Asia Pacific, Central and South America and the Caribbean. They’re constantly adding new residences to the portfolio, like the brand-new residences at Rosewood Mayakoba in Mexico, a ski chalet in Chamonix, France and Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Over 35% of the brand’s portfolio are four- or five-bedroom homes that, on average, cost around $3 million to $4 million. Exclusive Resorts operates the homes and is even involved in the design process when the company joins in on a project early enough.

“For Rosewood Mayakoba in Riviera Maya, Mexico, we worked with the developer on the design of the homes to ensure they have the floor plans and layouts we wanted, because we know what our members want when they travel,” Whitford says. “In Jackson Hole, our team is there installing the furniture, equipment and decor. We designed the homes ourselves and are carrying out the installation.”

When it comes to adding inventory, the most crucial element is finding the right destinations depending on member demand. Whitford says the company is focused on European expansion, as well as California wine country, Charleston, Nashville and mountain destinations in the U.S.

“We're looking for the A-plus destinations, where our members want to travel, and that's throughout the world,” says Sara Whitford. “There’s always a demand for beach, skiing and European properties. We look for homes that have been professionally designed with high-end appliances and common areas and gathering spaces.”

Whitford also adds that partnering with resorts like the Four Seasons in Anguilla or Rosewood Mayakoba is a benefit to the brands and hotels.

“Put simply, our members are their customers,” Whitford says. “Our members spend more than $100,000 annually on leisure travel and nearly $50 million on luxury accommodations outside of the club,” she says. “When Exclusive Resorts purchases residences at a resort location like Rosewood Mayakoba it means guaranteed revenue (upwards of $10,000 in incidentals per seven-night stay) and occupancy for our partners with the high likelihood of repeat visits and residential product sales. For example, since 2004 our club members have purchased more than $50 million of real estate after visiting our apartments on the private residential cruise ship The World.”

Exclusive Resorts is also unique in that membership can be passed down to children. This inheritable membership is an investment in the future of travel for families to continue to create memories and experiences.

Biologists see record-breaking bird banding season on Kiawah Island

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Bird banding season just wrapped up for the fall on Kiawah Island. It was a record-breaking season with more than 5,700 birds banded.It’s a tedious process for one biologist on Kiawah Island, but worth the time as he works to learn more about the different kind of birds that migrate through the island.My photographer, Jason Tighe, and I got to tag along for a day to see the process. It was a cloudy morning as we drove to the western edge of Kiawah Island and then hiked through some mud t...

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Bird banding season just wrapped up for the fall on Kiawah Island. It was a record-breaking season with more than 5,700 birds banded.

It’s a tedious process for one biologist on Kiawah Island, but worth the time as he works to learn more about the different kind of birds that migrate through the island.

My photographer, Jason Tighe, and I got to tag along for a day to see the process. It was a cloudy morning as we drove to the western edge of Kiawah Island and then hiked through some mud to where they capture the birds.

“It’s a very fine mesh net, and up against a dark background the birds are moving from one patch of cover to the other, it’s very hard for them to see,” said Aaron Given, Kiawah Island biologist.

They have 30 nets set up. Each bird captured is carefully put in a cloth bag and taken back to the bird banding station.

“There is a lot of work involved with this banding project, and this is just one site,” said Given. “We actually have another site at the other end of the island where we do the same thing with, so we have two of these going concurrently, and each year I hire between five and six seasonal helpers that they are out here with me every day.”

The same information is gathered at both stations: species, sex, weight and wing length. Some of the birds have already been banned, but if they aren’t, they get a shiny, new accessory.

“This is the band that goes on the bird’s leg. It’s got nine digits on it,” said Given. “This is a unique number for this bird. No other bird will have this number, so when we catch this bird again, we will be able to track its health and its movements.”

They can also monitor if the birds are putting on weight if they are recaptured.

“If they are, that’s a positive thing for the habitat out here," Given said. That means there is enough food for them to continue their migration."

They captured 100 different species of birds this fall – everything from a screech owl to a snowy egret to a cardinal to a woodpecker, in addition to more common species.

“This is a ruby crowned kinglet, one of the smallest birds, that we capture here at the banding station,” Given said. “This is a bird that spends its winter here on Kiawah.”

“The yellow-rumped warbler is probably one of the more common songbirds in the Lowcountry during the wintertime, and the reason for that is because of all the wax myrtles that we have growing,” Given said. “They are one of the few species that can actually digest the waxy coating on the wax myrtle berry, so that allows them to eat those. That food resource allows them to spend the winter further north than most other warblers.”

The long-term goal is to pick up on changes in the environment and see how the birds are responding to them. For now, lots of birds seem to enjoy coming to the island – even if it’s only a stop along their migration south.

“I think a lot of it has to do with the habitat that we have on Kiawah. We have a lot of natural habitat left of Kiawah even though there is development on the island,” Given said. “The way it was developed – it was done in a more environmentally sensitive way, so a lot of the lots that we have, they are cleared just the footprint for the home and all the natural vegetation is left intact so that creates and leaves these corridors for the wildlife to use and move through between the houses and between the dunes and between the homes and the marsh.”

For more from the Kiawah Island Bird Banding blog, click here.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

Office Hours

  • Mon – 8:00am to 12:00pm – 2:00pm to 6:00pm
  • Tue – 2:00pm to 6:00pm
  • Wed – 8:00am to 12:00pm – 2:00pm to 6:00pm
  • Thu – 8:00am to 12:00pm – 2:00pm to 6:00pm
  • Fri – 8:00am to 12:00pm

Service Areas

Copyright by summervillespineanddisc 2021. All rights reserved.