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If you are always in pain and have given up on your doctor's suggested therapies, we've got great news - a permanent solution to your back and foot pain may be closer than you might think.

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At James Island Spine & Disc Center, our doctors are not just experts. They're people, too, and understand how pain and back problems can be crippling. Our goal is to get you well as soon as possible, without drugs or surgeries. That way, you can get back to a normal, healthy living for years to come.

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If you find yourself in a situation where you need to see a chiropractor as soon as possible, we're here for you. Our chiropractors have treated thousands of patients, and we can treat you too.

Our office offers a robust range of chiropractic services in James Island, from custom shoe insoles for your feet to adjustments and massages for your back.

James Island Spine & Disc Center: Treating More Than Symptoms

Are you looking for a chiropractor in James Island, SC who treats more than just symptoms? If you're sick of chiropractic services that aren't tailored to your needs and body, it's time to make a change. Our expert chiropractors at James Island Spine & Disc Center focus on your needs, not an idealized version of you. From chiropractic adjustments to custom shoe inserts and spinal decompression, we have the services and treatments you need to live life to the fullest.

Ready to live your best life free of pain? Contact our office today or explore our site to learn more about the James Island Spine & Disc Center difference. We want you to feel comfortable knowing that you will be treated with care, compassion, and excellence every time you visit our office.

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Latest News in James Island, SC

Summerville townhomes sell for $54M; new multifamilty units planned on James Island

A newly built Summerville multifamily development is under new ownership after fetching $54 million.An affiliate of real estate development firm LyvWell Communities of Tampa, Fla., paid about $409,000 per key in early October for the 132-unit Chamberlain Pines Townhomes at 1060 Orangeburg Road, according to Dorchester County land records.The previous owners were Blaze Capital Partners of Charleston and Cross Lake Partners of New York City.Developed by Bl...

A newly built Summerville multifamily development is under new ownership after fetching $54 million.

An affiliate of real estate development firm LyvWell Communities of Tampa, Fla., paid about $409,000 per key in early October for the 132-unit Chamberlain Pines Townhomes at 1060 Orangeburg Road, according to Dorchester County land records.

The previous owners were Blaze Capital Partners of Charleston and Cross Lake Partners of New York City.

Developed by Blaze and regional homebuilder Dan Ryan in 2021, Chamberlain Pines features two-story rental units, averaging 1,685 square feet across three and four-bedroom living quarters. The units include attached garages, concrete backyard patios and private fenced-in yards.

Blaze co-founder Chris Riley said the sale creates new investment opportunities for the company in South Carolina and across Sunbelt states.

A LyvWell representative said the company bought Chamberlain Pines, its first acquisition in the Lowcountry, for a variety of factors, including the ability to provide an amenity plan that encourages a healthy lifestyle.

“We target high-quality locations with solid growth prospects throughout the southeast U.S., and the income and job growth that Charleston is experiencing outpaces that of the national average which makes it an extremely attractive market for us,” said Jordan Farrales, director of acquisitions.

LyvWell’s website shows one other South Carolina community on the way to Columbia. Details on the project’s number of units and location were not provided and a spokeswoman said the project has been “pushed back a bit.”

New townhomes

A new townhome community is planned on James Island.

Property owner FMM Theresa Holdings LLC wants to build 16 units on 2.6 undeveloped acres on Theresa Drive.

The property is next to the James Island Expressway off Harbor View Road. The owner bought the land in 2020 for $950,000, according to Charleston County land records.

The land is zoned for single-family, two-family and diverse residential uses. The city’s Planning Commission will consider the proposal Oct. 19.

Moving on

Several agents recently left the commercial real estate firm Avison Young to form a new company.

Vitre Ravenel Stephens, Tradd Varner and Todd Garrett, with 45 years of real estate experience between them, are principals in the new Harbor Commercial Partners at 146 Williman St. on Charleston’s upper peninsula.

Garrett is broker-in-charge. Also, Taylor Sekanovich and Crawford Riddle are associate brokers.

All five were previously with Avison Young. Stephens said the departures were amicable.

“The opportunity presented itself to form our own company, so we decided now was the time to do it,” she said.

The new firm will focus on sales, leasing and property management of all commercial property types in the Charleston region. Fifteen-year property management veteran Tracy Watson will oversee that side of the business.

Changing hands

An East Cooper air-conditioning, heating, plumbing and gas systems company recently acquired a similar business in Dorchester County.

1st Choice A/C, Heating, Plumbing & Gas of Huger now owns Dorchester Heating and Air Co. west of Summerville. Financial terms of the sale were not disclosed.

“We will work tirelessly to continue to provide five-star service,” said Tim Myers of the locally owned and operated company. “We take our time and do the job right while giving the customer options so they don’t feel pressured by sales.”

Myers started a heating and air-conditioning company in 1999 in Mount Pleasant, sold it in 2010 and decided to start 1st Choice to provide services he said people need and a place where employees feel like a team and are treated like family.

Charleston leaders address flooding in James Island neighborhood

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Charleston City leaders provided some insight on a flood-prone neighborhood on James Island that saw an excess of water after Hurricane Ian.News 2 first introduced viewers to Michael Miller and his wife on Friday when Hurricane Ian flooded their home and others on Shoreham Road.According to Miller, it took about five to six hours for the water to drain on the street and about three hours for it to recede inside his home.“We just started getting as much of the water and as much of t...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Charleston City leaders provided some insight on a flood-prone neighborhood on James Island that saw an excess of water after Hurricane Ian.

News 2 first introduced viewers to Michael Miller and his wife on Friday when Hurricane Ian flooded their home and others on Shoreham Road.

According to Miller, it took about five to six hours for the water to drain on the street and about three hours for it to recede inside his home.

“We just started getting as much of the water and as much of the dirt out as we could. Putting up fans, scrubbing down everything. Trying to assess the damage,” said Miller.

According to Charleston City leaders, Shoreham Road is known to flood because it sits in a low-lying area.

“It’s a neighborhood where when that water falls on the streets and on the roofs and on the properties it’s hard to move it out very quickly especially if we get higher tides,” explained Matthew Fountain, the Director of Stormwater Management for the City of Charleston.

There are a few projects in the works to help prevent flooding in the neighborhood. Fountain said one includes a rain garden that is set to be built at the site of a former flood-prone home the city acquired through federal grants.

He said the other small project consists of constructing a drainage swale system to help store more water in the neighborhood. While these projects can help with a typical thunderstorm/rain event, Fountain said it will take more to prevent flooding in a major storm like Ian.

“That neighborhood is going to experience flooding. That’s part of the reason we’ve looked at home acquisitions and demolition in that location giving people the opportunity if they have a heavily flooded home to have the city work with the federal government and eventually buy their homes,” explained Fountain.

Meanwhile, drainage projects on other parts of James Island seem to be showing signs of improvement. News 2 met with Charleston County Councilwoman Jenny Costa Honeycutt at the Charleston Municipal Golf Course where drainage improvements are underway.

She said Hurricane Ian was one of the first big storms to hit the area since rolling out the projects. Because of the work that was done over the last few years, Honeycutt said the water in the system was able to drain within one tide cycle, as opposed to sitting for days as it has in the past.

“One of the parts of the improvements that really helped was cleaning out the Stono River outfall and then back up the ditch system to the entire watershed, so that water could drain out faster. In conjunction, we also enhanced these ponds you see on the golf course to allow more water to stay in the system as the tides change,” explained Honeycutt.

According to city leaders, they monitor streets like Shoreham Road ahead of big storms, making sure the pipes aren’t clogged.

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Vote now: Who should be SBLIve’s South Carolina High School Coach of the Week (Oct. 27-29)

Here are the candidates for SBLive’s South Carolina High School Coach of the Week for Oct. 27-29 as nominated SBLive’s staff. Read through the nominees and cast your vote at the bottom of the page. Voting will conclude on Thursday, Nov. 3rd at 11:59 p.m. and the winner will be announced Friday, Nov. 4th. THIS WEEK’S SOUTH CAROLINA COACH OF THE WEEK NOMINEESEditor’s note: Our Coach of the Week feature and corresponding poll is intended to be fun...

Here are the candidates for SBLive’s South Carolina High School Coach of the Week for Oct. 27-29 as nominated SBLive’s staff. Read through the nominees and cast your vote at the bottom of the page. Voting will conclude on Thursday, Nov. 3rd at 11:59 p.m. and the winner will be announced Friday, Nov. 4th.

THIS WEEK’S SOUTH CAROLINA COACH OF THE WEEK NOMINEES

Editor’s note: Our Coach of the Week feature and corresponding poll is intended to be fun, and we do not set limits on how many times a fan can vote during the competition. However, we do not allow votes that are generated by script, macro or other automated means. Coaches that receive votes by script, macro or other automated means will be disqualified.

Ken Floyd, A.C. Flora

Let’s see. Capping off an undefeated regular season, winning the region championship and securing home field advantage throughout the Lower State playoffs isn't too bad for a coach in his first year at a school.

Greg Hill, North Myrtle Beach

The Chiefs have taken their lumps this year with a very young team. But Hill, in his first year as head coach at North Myrtle Beach, has remained optimistic. And that paid off in a big way Friday night. The Chiefs upset rival Myrtle Beach 20-14 and secured a state playoff berth.

Mark Hodge, Spartanburg

It seems like the Vikings are always right there in late October. They won a 42-41 thriller over rival Dorman to finish the regular season 6-4 and second place in their region. That was after a 1-3 start.

Tom Knotts, Dutch Fork

The legendary coach picked up yet another region title at Dutch Fork and it was culminated by a 63-7 wipeout of a very good Lexington team. Dutch Fork has won or shared the region championship 14 consecutive seasons under Knotts. During that time the Silver Foxes have won six state championships.

Jamar McKoy, James Island

James Island whipped Lucy Beckham 33-7 to claim the program’s first region championship in nearly three decades. The Trojans sport a 9-1 record after going 5-5 last season.

Mark Clifford, Beaufort Academy

The Eagles beat Bethesda Academy 35-30 to secure the SCISA 1-2A region championship. It's the first region title in school history.

Brian Hennecy, Marion

Marion blanked rival Mullins 48-0 to finish the regular season 8-2. The Swamp Foxes won the Region 8-AA championship.

Top stars, best performances in Week 11 of the South Carolina high school football season

Here are the top performances that caught our attention across the state in Week 11 of the South Carolina high school football seasonLogan Jones, Lake ViewWhat didn’t Jones do?The senior standout accounted for five touchdowns and got them three different ways in a 40-32 win over Hannah-Pamplico. Jones, splitting time at tailback and quarterback, ran 14 times for 82 yards and 3 touchdowns, He also caught 2 passes for 49 yards and a touchdown and returned an interception 20 yards for a another score....

Here are the top performances that caught our attention across the state in Week 11 of the South Carolina high school football season

Logan Jones, Lake View

What didn’t Jones do?

The senior standout accounted for five touchdowns and got them three different ways in a 40-32 win over Hannah-Pamplico. Jones, splitting time at tailback and quarterback, ran 14 times for 82 yards and 3 touchdowns, He also caught 2 passes for 49 yards and a touchdown and returned an interception 20 yards for a another score.

Jarvis Green, Dutch Fork

Different Friday, same stuff from the Dutch Fork star. Green had 289 yards total offense and 6 touchdowns in a 63-7 runaway win over Lexington.

Suderian Harrison, Woodland

The Wolverines’ quarterback threw six touchdown passes and ran for another in a 55-14 pounding of Edisto.

Omarion Buckmon, Bamberg-Ehrhardt

Buckmon ran for a touchdown and intercepted two passes as the Red Raiders beat Whale Branch 21-3.

LaNorris Sellers, South Florence

The Syracuse recruit ran for 116 yards and 3 touchdowns while throwing for 168 yards and a touchdown as the Bruins whipped rival West Florence 45-14 in a battle of undefeated teams.

DeQuan Durham, North Myrtle Beach

Durham carried 24 times for 195 yards and a touchdown as the Chiefs held off rival Myrtle Beach 20-14.

Will Young, Brookland-Cayce

The Bearcats lost 35-21 to Gilbert but Young distinguished himself with three interceptions.

Cooper Johns, River Bluff

Johns ran for 227 yards and 5 touchdowns as River Bluff set a school record for points in a 70-21 rout of Chapin.

A.J. Brand, Irmo

The Yellow Jackets’ quarterback was sensational again, throwing for 234 yards while running for 173 yards and 3 touchdowns in a 38-21 victory over Lugoff-Elgin.

Demarcus Greene, James Island

Greene made two big-time plays, catching a 57-yard touchdown pass and returning an interception 99 yards for a touchdown as the Trojans whipped Lucy Beckham 33-7 for the their first region championship in nearly three decades.

Scott Saylor, Carolina Forest

The Spartans’ quarterback threw for 404 yards and 3 touchdowns in a 41-21 win over St. James that clinched second place their region.

John Peeples, Sumter

Peeples ran for 4 touchdowns and over 100 yards as the Gamecocks rolled past Conway 45-0.

J’Shawn Anderson, Hartsville

The Red Foxes’ tailback had another big night, running for 181 yards and 4 touchdowns in a 63-44 win over Wilson.

Tremel Echols, Wilson

Though the Tigers lost, Echols had a fantastic game, throwing for 419 yards and 5 touchdowns while also running for 63 yards and a touchdowns.

Zandae Butler, Wilson

A primary target of Echols, Butler had 167 yards and 4 touchdowns on 6 catches.

Zay Brown, Cheraw

The senior running back ran for eight touchdowns in a 55-42 win over Chesterfield. Among his touchdowns were runs of 42, 63 and 45 yards.

Quay’Sheed Scott, Marion

Scott scored four touchdowns - two rushing and two receiving - in the Swamp Foxes’ 48-0 win over rival Mullins.

Ty Martin, Dillon

Martin ran for four touchdowns in the undefeated Lions’ 41-0 win over Georgetown.

Raheim Jeter, Spartanburg

The Vikings’ quarterback threw for 118 yards and 2 touchdowns while running for 3 touchdowns in a 42-41 thriller over city rival Dorman.

Demarius Foster, Dorman

The 5-foot-8, 163-pound tailback ran 36 times for 263 yards and 3 touchdowns.

Markel Townsend, A.C. Flora

The star tailback ran for over 200 yards and 3 touchdowns as the undefeated Falcons outlasted Ridge View 31-22.

Tyleke Mathis, Saluda

Mathis ran for 108 yards and a touchdown and returned a punt for a touchdown as the Tigers beat Batesburg-Leesville 24-7.

Max Vonhohenstraeten, Bluffton

The senior quarterback tied a school record with six touchdown passes in a 52-22 rout of Colleton County.

Hicks: Johns Island finally gets a seat at the table. It could’ve had 3.

The people of Johns Island have spoken — and, much to their surprise, Charleston City Council actually listened.And they’ll no doubt be listening even more soon, because Johns Island’s voice is about to get notably louder.On Tuesday, City Council is expected to pledge that Johns Island — for the first time — will get its own council district when a new census-mandated redistricting map is approved.Despite some mild reservations from a couple of members, this resolution is almost certain to p...

The people of Johns Island have spoken — and, much to their surprise, Charleston City Council actually listened.

And they’ll no doubt be listening even more soon, because Johns Island’s voice is about to get notably louder.

On Tuesday, City Council is expected to pledge that Johns Island — for the first time — will get its own council district when a new census-mandated redistricting map is approved.

Despite some mild reservations from a couple of members, this resolution is almost certain to pass. So, come November 2023, some lucky (or masochistic) Johns Islander will win a seat on Charleston City Council.

That’s good news ... and potentially a prime example of how folks should be careful what they wish for.

Right now, Johns Island is part of Councilman Karl Brady’s West Ashley-based district. Residents aren’t thrilled with the arrangement, although their gripe isn’t with Brady.

John Zlogar, chairman of the Johns Island Task Force, told council at a redistricting workshop last week that a recent poll found 86% of residents want the island represented by a single district … because they want to ensure one of their own is on council.

“For years, Johns Island has felt like a stepchild who did not have a seat at the table,” Zlogar said.

Yes, the island has always been tacked onto a West Ashley or James Island council district. But in the past decade, the island’s population of city residents has grown to nearly 12,000 — making it almost the perfect size for a single council district.

But the city’s earliest drafts for new districts had Johns Island divvied up between two or even three council members. Those plans proved unpopular on the island, so a parade of folks (including the League of Women Voters) urged council to reconsider.

Even West Ashley Councilman Ross Appel — who would get part of the island under one of the proposals — argued Johns Island would be better off with its own representative.

Makes sense. But so does the advice islanders have gotten from veteran Councilman Keith Waring.

Waring sympathizes with Johns Islanders, because he remembers when West Ashley didn’t have an adequate voice on council. But several weeks ago, he warned them about unintended consequences.

See, in the city’s initial plans, Johns Island was slated to make up almost two-thirds of one district and close to 40% of another. Another proposed map even had a sliver of the island in a third district.

Yes, that divided the island — but it gave residents significant sway over two council members (and some influence over a third, since council races are often decided by less than 1,000 votes).

Waring supports giving Johns Island its own district, but he notes the original map wasn’t a bad deal for them.

“I asked them if they know that Three Dog Night song, ‘One is the loneliest number,’” Waring recalls. “Because it takes seven votes to get anything on council.”

And having electoral influence over three council members and the mayor, Waring notes, gets them more than halfway to that magic number.

It also gives them more votes when local opinions vary, as they often do on Johns Island. See: Interstate 526.

He’s right, of course. Having all of Johns Island in one district ensures residents have a voice at City Hall (well, two, if you count the mayor). Conversely, it means they have no influence over the 11 other council members, who could completely ignore their wishes.

“Not that council would do that,” Waring says.

Yes, not that council would do that. City Council is normally a conscientious group. Well, as normal and conscientious as politics is these days.

Johns Islanders should understand the dynamic. On Charleston County Council, they’re represented by Councilwomen Anna Johnson and Jenny Honeycutt, neither of whom lives on the island. But both fight vigorously for its interests. Earlier this year, the pair teamed up to kill plans for an unpopular burn site on Johns Island.

Islanders assured Waring they considered his scenario — and math — but believe the upside of their own seat outweighs the potential pitfalls. Maybe it does.

Either way, Johns Island has apparently won — and it wasn’t easy. The map that gives them a single seat is going to cost Councilman Jason Sakran his, and council was hesitant to unseat an elected member.

But Waring argued this has happened before, and last week his colleagues realized they couldn’t save Sakran’s seat ... or split Johns Island.

As Appel noted, council members should be able to explain their districts in English — which means they ought to represent an easily definable area.

A Johns Island district fits that definition almost perfectly. But as Waring noted in plain-spoken political terms, it won’t be perfect.

Because when you’re one voice out of 12, and not three, some things are bound to get lost in translation.

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