Chiropractic Care in Goose Creek, SC

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At Goose Creek Spine & Disc Center, we offer our valued clients a wide range of chiropractic services that solve serious symptoms like:

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Chiropractic Care Goose Creek, SC843-832-4499

If you are always in pain and have given up on your doctor's suggested therapies, we've got great news - a permanent solution to your back and foot pain may be closer than you might think.

As doctors and specialists, we hold true to our core values:

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We want you to feel comfortable knowing that from your first visit, you will be treated with the care and compassion you would expect from a team of professionals.

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At Goose Creek Spine & Disc Center, our doctors are not just experts. They're people, too, and understand how pain and back problems can be crippling. Our goal is to get you well as soon as possible, without drugs or surgeries. That way, you can get back to a normal, healthy living for years to come.

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We pair cutting-edge technology with advanced chiropractic services like spinal decompression to get your life back on track.

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If you find yourself in a situation where you need to see a chiropractor as soon as possible, we're here for you. Our chiropractors have treated thousands of patients, and we can treat you too.

Our office offers a robust range of chiropractic services in Goose Creek, from custom shoe insoles for your feet to adjustments and massages for your back.

Goose Creek Spine & Disc Center: Treating More Than Symptoms

Are you looking for a chiropractor in Goose Creek, SC who treats more than just symptoms? If you're sick of chiropractic services that aren't tailored to your needs and body, it's time to make a change. Our expert chiropractors at Goose Creek Spine & Disc Center focus on your needs, not an idealized version of you. From chiropractic adjustments to custom shoe inserts and spinal decompression, we have the services and treatments you need to live life to the fullest.

Ready to live your best life free of pain? Contact our office today or explore our site to learn more about the Goose Creek Spine & Disc Center difference. We want you to feel comfortable knowing that you will be treated with care, compassion, and excellence every time you visit our office.

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Latest News in Goose Creek, SC

Goose Creek High graduate overcomes ADD, starts new business

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCIV) — Today is graduation day for many high schoolers across the Lowcountry and we want to highlight these students' achievements.For one Goose Creek High graduate, the road to this moment was anything but ordinary."I'm just ready to walk across that stage, grab that paper and get on with my life,” Kashee...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCIV) — Today is graduation day for many high schoolers across the Lowcountry and we want to highlight these students' achievements.

For one Goose Creek High graduate, the road to this moment was anything but ordinary.

"I'm just ready to walk across that stage, grab that paper and get on with my life,” Kasheem Jenkins said.

The path this 2022 graduate took while crossing the stage at the North Charleston Coliseum was much easier than the path he took to get through school.

Kasheem was diagnosed with predominantly inattentive type ADHD, a form of the disorder that makes it difficult to focus, concentrate or complete tasks.

“I'm just emotional. It's like we're finally here. I didn't think I would see this day,” Kasheem’s mother Mari Jenkins said.

It’s a condition that affects over 13% of students in South Carolina, and for Kasheem it made school even more challenging. “It was a struggle. [There] was days that I wanted to give up,” Kasheem said.

Jenkins initially started school in Colombia. There, Kasheem thrived as the education system in the South American country had smaller classroom sizes and more one-on-one attention.

But it was a different story when he returned to the Lowcountry for high school.

“He gets to Goose Creek High School for ninth grade and blew it," Mari recalled. "He failed the whole entire [thing]. I think he passed one class."

This is a reality many kids with Attention Deficit Disorder go through. As the family points out, a lot of parents might not know the root of the problem or the resources to get help.

Kasheem tried medicine and other alternatives, but none of them did the job.

“I think in ninth grade, I almost gave up," he said. "I didn't want to do anything. I just wanted to get on [with my life] I wanted to drop out at a point.”

But it was a mother’s passion and determination that kept Kasheem on the right path.

“I spent so much time up there at the school, I thought I needed a paycheck,” Mari Jenkins said.

Kasheem discovered the Individual Education Program, or IEP, at Goose Greek High. It’s a state program, created in the early 2000s to give students with disabilities individualized support and resources for success.

With the support of family, friends and resource counselors at Goose Creek, Kasheem was able to get back on track.

In fact, he went from failing to honor roll in just two years and now he is set up to do even more post graduation.

“When he walks across the stage Friday, he's going to walk from being a high school student to an entrepreneur,” Mari said.

With the help of his mother, Kasheem is starting his own business, transporting dogs across the country for people who can’t. His company is called Esprit de Corps, and is a spin-off of Mari's company Semper Fi Pet Transportation service.

The transformation in Kasheem’s life is something he hopes will inspire others. “Don't let anything stop you from doing what you want to do," he said. "Go straight forward. Take risks.”

It’s also something his mother hopes will push parents just like her to never give up.

“I think the stigma is that these children are not smart and that is absolutely not true,” Mari said. “I encourage the parents to reach out. There are resources for you. Medication is one but it's not the answer. There are resources in the school system. You need to be proactive and go in there.”

ABC News 4 wants to hear more stories like Kasheem’s throughout the graduation season. You can submit info on fellow graduates to us at ABCNews4.com

Players to start tracking in South Carolina: Class of 2023

2023 Christopher Parker (AC Flora): Parker is a new name that really caught our eyes on the floor. He is a 6’6, strong-built prospect but what really intrigued us was his versatility on the floor. He has the body to battle down low and be active on the boards, but also has guard-like skills, can rebound and push in transition, gets downhill and scores the ball, and also knock down shots as well. Parker is one that is flying a little under the radar but really played well throughout the weekend.2023 Justin Britt (Goose Creek): Br...

2023 Christopher Parker (AC Flora): Parker is a new name that really caught our eyes on the floor. He is a 6’6, strong-built prospect but what really intrigued us was his versatility on the floor. He has the body to battle down low and be active on the boards, but also has guard-like skills, can rebound and push in transition, gets downhill and scores the ball, and also knock down shots as well. Parker is one that is flying a little under the radar but really played well throughout the weekend.

2023 Justin Britt (Goose Creek): Britt is one of the clear leaders for his team, as the 6’4 prospect plays strong. He excels on both ends of the floor, making plays on the offensive and defensive end, playing with great energy, and was strong at getting downhill. He has good athleticism in his game and can be used in several areas of the floor.

2023 Avante Parker (Gray Collegiate): One of two Gray Collegiate prospects that impressed, one can easily see why many schools are targeting Parker and why he holds multiple offers already. He stands at 6’9, can operate from multiple levels, and really be a tough matchup on the floor. He is comfortable in stepping out and putting it on the deck to score but also uses his size and athleticism to attack the boards and finish around the paint.

2023 Montravis White (Gray Collegiate): White is the other player for Gray Collegiate that really caught out eyes. Why? He is a 5’11 point guard that simply just made plays after plays; he brings a toughness to the court, plays with tremendous energy, isn’t afraid of the bright lights and hitting big shots but also made plays for his teammates. White really showed that he is coachable and wants to only get better as a player, learning from his mistakes and leading the charge for his team.

2023 Jamarcus Wilkins (Dorman): Wilkins was one that we brought to our platform a while back and we have seen this young man really take strong steps in developing his game. Wilkins continues to be active down low, has only gotten stronger, uses his length to impact on the defensive end, and has gotten better on the offensive end. Wilkins will be a key piece for Dorman this year.

2023 Arden Conyers (Westwood): Conyers is another prospect that has really seen his recruitment take off and it doesn’t take long to see why. At 6’7, Conyers has great size, creates well off the dribble, can knock down shots from multiple levels, finishes well over defenders, and can be very versatile on the floor. Operates from multiple levels and really has seen his recruitment take off, and I don’t see that slowing down.

Gov. McMaster vetoes $53M in budget earmarks. Nearly half of that is for 1 Columbia project.

COLUMBIA — Gov. Henry McMaster struck $52.7 million in earmarks from the Legislature’s nearly $14 billion spending package, saying legislators are still using taxpayers’ money for pet projects without properly vetting them.In all, McMaster vetoed 73 items, but 10 of those are policy directives that don’t spend money, and 29 officially spend just $1 each, though they don’t really allocate anything. They were essentially place-holders for negotiations between the House and Senate.It is only the secon...

COLUMBIA — Gov. Henry McMaster struck $52.7 million in earmarks from the Legislature’s nearly $14 billion spending package, saying legislators are still using taxpayers’ money for pet projects without properly vetting them.

In all, McMaster vetoed 73 items, but 10 of those are policy directives that don’t spend money, and 29 officially spend just $1 each, though they don’t really allocate anything. They were essentially place-holders for negotiations between the House and Senate.

It is only the second year the budget has publicly listed local projects funded at legislators’ request, not the agency the money is funneled through. While thanking legislators for finally disclosing the previously hidden spending, McMaster said it’s not enough to simply list the sponsor and recipient.

“Without sufficient context, description, justification or information regarding the project and how the recipient intends to spend the funds, the public cannot evaluate the earmark’s merit,” he wrote in his June 22 veto letter.

“Moreover, no matter how deserving the project, the public must be confident that proper accountability measures are in place to ensure the funds are appropriately spent,” he added, repeating his request that legislators create a public, competitive grants process for such spending.

For the first time, McMaster asked legislators sponsoring earmarks to send his office details about their request to include how it serves the public and the project’s budget. Most sponsors complied, corresponding with the governor’s office as late as June 21.

Many of the earmarks McMaster got little-to-no explanation for were struck, including $300,000 for a Goose Creek library, $750,000 for a library in Turbeville, $2 million for a community center in West Orangeburg, and $5 million for Socastee Park in Horry County.

“We did as much research as we could,” he told reporters in releasing his vetoes. “In some cases, we still have no idea what the money’s going for.”

But communication alone didn’t save items from McMaster’s veto pen, as in the case of the largest single item struck, by far: $25 million for a quantum computing operation in Columbia’s Five Points.

The senator who requested the one-time expense, Democrat Dick Harpootlian, said South Carolina has a unique opportunity to use next-generation powerful technology to turn Columbia into a research hub, and he’s hopeful his colleagues will vote next week to override the veto. The money would buy a quantum computer, which can make calculations far faster than even supercomputers, and set up a nonprofit to rent time on it to entrepreneurs and researchers, he said.

The terms of the potential buy handled through the state Department of Commerce are good only through next month, he said.

“This is transformative technology,” Harpootlian told The Post and Courier. “Columbia is never going to be a tourist destination. We’re not going to have a huge manufacturing plant. This is an opportunity for us to go in a different direction to be a technology hub, a technology magnet.”

He intentionally did not link the project to the nearby University of South Carolina, which is classified as a research college.

“We don’t believe government, whether it’s a university or any government agency, would be agile and adept enough to make (the technology) available to entrepreneurs,” Harpootlian said. “This will make Columbia a magnet for the brightest minds.”

McMaster countered the budget directive creates a “dangerous precedent” that skirts state procurement laws. Whether the state should set up a nonprofit to own such technology should be handled through separate legislation that goes through the normal process of public testimony and debate, he said in his veto letter.

Other spending struck includes:

• $7 million for a cultural welcome center in Orangeburg, for which McMaster said he received incomplete information. It remains questionable whether taxpayer money should be spent on a project with “no demonstrated need or community support,” according to his veto letter.

• $500,000 for upgrades to the John McKissick Field at Summerville High School, sponsored by House Judiciary Chairman Chris Murphy, R-North Charleston.

“Coach McKissick’s legacy is unquestioned,” McMaster wrote. He “brought acclaim to South Carolina high school football and touched countless lives.”

But upgrades to high school athletic facilities should be funded by the school district or athletic boost club, he wrote.

• $300,000 to the Charleston Wine + Food Festival, sponsored by Rep. Leon Stavrinakis, D-Charleston. The event’s move to North Charleston prompted the city of Charleston to stop funding it. The future of the event should be resolved before any state tax dollars are spent on it, McMaster wrote.

The Legislature will return next week to consider McMaster’s vetoes before the fiscal year starts July 1. Traditionally, most of the governor’s vetoes are overturned.

15 ways to celebrate Fourth of July in the Charleston area, from concerts to fireworks

The biggest party of the summer is upon us. With Independence Day just around the corner, Charleston is gearing up to celebrate.If you’d like to join in the Fourth of July festivities, we’ve got some ideas for you. From patriotic parades to fireworks shows to outdoor concerts, there are festive events happening all across the Lowcountry.Stephen Marley at Firefly Distillery7 p.m. July 1, Firefly Distillery, 4201 Spruill Ave. If you’re looking to get the party started ea...

The biggest party of the summer is upon us. With Independence Day just around the corner, Charleston is gearing up to celebrate.

If you’d like to join in the Fourth of July festivities, we’ve got some ideas for you. From patriotic parades to fireworks shows to outdoor concerts, there are festive events happening all across the Lowcountry.

Stephen Marley at Firefly Distillery

7 p.m. July 1, Firefly Distillery, 4201 Spruill Ave.

If you’re looking to get the party started early, this show at Firefly Distillery is a great kickstart to Independence Day weekend. Stephen Marley, son of reggae legend Bob Marley, will be performing. Doors to the show open at 6 p.m., and the music begins at 7 p.m. There will be Firefly cocktails, beer, wine and fare from local food trucks. Concertgoers are encouraged to bring blankets and chairs, but dogs and outside food and drink are prohibited.

General admission tickets can be purchased in advance at fireflydistillery.com/live-music for $30 and will be $35 at the door. VIP tickets, which include premium parking, a private bathroom and a special viewing area, are $100.

Party at the Point

5 p.m. July 1, Charleston Harbor Resort and Marina, 20 Patriots Point Road

Also kicking off Fourth of July weekend is a Party at the Point concert. Greg Keys & Company will play at the Charleston Harbor Resort and Marina.

Tickets, which are $10, can be bought in advance at citypapertickets.com/events/121834283/greg-keys-company.

Weekend of live music at The Windjammer + IOP fireworks

July 1-4, The Windjammer, 1008 Ocean Blvd.

The Windjammer has a packed concert weekend on the Isle of Palms, kicking off with Flipturn on the outdoor Liquid Aloha Beach Stage at 6 p.m. July 1, followed by Flashmob at 9 p.m. Edwin McCain will play on the same stage at 6 p.m. July 2 and then two nights in a row of Drivin ‘N Cryin. On July 3, Drivin ‘N Cryin will play at 6 p.m., followed by Eddie Bush at 9 p.m. On July 4, Drivin ’N Cryin will perform at 9 p.m.

Tickets, which range from $10-$30, can be purchased in advance at the-windjammer.com/events.

Isle of Palms fireworks will be launched around 9 p.m. July 4, though most of the front beach will be closed to guests at the time. Viewing from the country park parking lot area will be available.

Charleston Symphony + RiverDogs game at baseball stadium

7-8 p.m. July 2; 6:35 p.m. July 4, Joseph P. Riley Stadium, 360 Fishburne St.

The RiverDogs stadium will host the Charleston Symphony on July 2 for a free community celebration put on by the city of Charleston. The symphony will perform patriotic songs, followed by a fireworks show, and gates open at 6 p.m. Complimentary tickets must be reserved in advance at charlestonarts.org.

On the big day itself, crowds will once again be in the stands of the stadium for a home RiverDogs game. The largest fireworks show of the season is planned to explode on July 4 after the ball game, set to a medley of all-American music. The gates open at 5:45 p.m., and tickets can be bought at milb.com/charleston/schedule/2022-07.

Daniel Island Independence Day Celebration

3:15-9 p.m. July 2, Smythe Park, 2364 Daniel Island Drive

Daniel Island is “painting the town red, white and blue” with a celebration that takes place the Saturday before the Fourth. There will be a patriotic parade, including decorated golf carts and bikes, at 4 p.m., followed by patriotic tunes by DJ Shane Griffin at Smythe Park. The Charleston Concert Band will play from 5-6 p.m., while rock, country and shag hits will be performed by E2 & The Feel from 6-9 p.m. Food trucks will be available, but there won’t be any fireworks.

The parade starts at the Bishop England High School parking lot by the sports field. Guests should arrive between 3:15-3:45 p.m. and attendance is free.

Moncks Corner Fourth of July Celebration

6 p.m. July 2, Moncks Corner Regional Recreation Complex, 418 East Main St.

Moncks Corner is also hosting an early Fourth of July celebration. Attendees can watch fireworks from their cars or bring a blanket and lawn chairs to spread out on the event field. A live band and DJ will play, and there will be food trucks, face painters, balloon artists and a vendor market. Alcohol, grills, pets and fireworks are not allowed at the family-friendly event. Fireworks begin at dusk.

There will be free parking and admission.

North Charleston Fourth of July Festival

5-10 p.m. July 4, North Charleston Riverfront Park, 1061 Everglades Ave.

North Charleston’s epic Independence Day extravaganza is back this year and boasting the Lowcountry’s largest fireworks show. There will be fireworks at dark and music by the North Charleston Pops! and DJ Natty Heavy.

Entry and parking are free, and guests are encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets, water and snacks, though 25 food trucks will be on site. No grills, sparklers or outside fireworks are allowed.

Patriots Point Fireworks Blast

7:30-10 p.m. July 4, Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum, 40 Patriots Point Road

After a three-year hiatus, Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum is reopening its hangar doors aboard the aircraft carrier Yorktown to guests for watching fireworks over the Charleston Harbor. Guests are encouraged to bring their own lawn chairs for flight deck seating. Personal food, drinks and alcohol will not be permitted or sold on the deck, but each ticket comes with a complimentary bottle of water, and King of Pops will sell gourmet popsicles. There will be 15 landside food trucks serving up fare before the show begins.

Parking is limited, not guaranteed and costs $20 in addition to $25 tickets that allow flight deck entry. A ticket link is available at patriotspoint.org/news-and-events/annual-4th-of-july-fireworks-blast-returns-to-patriots-point.

Kiawah Island Fourth of July Bike Parade and Festival

5 p.m.-9:30 p.m. July 4, Kiawah Island

Patriots of all ages are encouraged to join a Kiawah Island parade on bikes, skates, rollerblades or by foot. The Kiawah Island Recreation Department will lead the parade followed by Uncle Sam, Lady Liberty and Captain America. Bike decorating begins at 5 p.m., and the parade starts promptly at 5:45 p.m. The route leads participants down Sea Forest Drive from The East Beach Village and finishes at Night Heron Park, where everyone is welcomed to join the Independence Day Festival that starts at 6 p.m. and will feature live music, carnival games, inflatables, a photo booth, a watermelon eating contest and more. Food, inspired by a traditional cookout menu, will be served until 9 p.m. for a cost. No coolers are allowed. Fireworks will light up the sky at 9:15 p.m.

Admission is free, though some attractions are available at a cost, and no reservations are required.

Fabulous Fourth in the Creek

6:30-9:30 p.m. July 4, Goose Creek Municipal Center, 519A North Goose Creek Blvd.

The city of Goose Creek’s annual Fourth of July celebration and fireworks display will showcase live music, a variety of food vendors and free kids’ activities. Outside fireworks, sparklers and alcohol are prohibited.

Admission and parking are free, but parking is limited. There’s a rain date of July 9.

Folly Beach Fourth of July Fireworks

9 p.m. July 4, Folly Beach County Park, 1100 W. Ashley Ave.

Folly Beach will celebrate the Fourth of July with a fireworks display hosted by the Folly Association of Business. Locals and visitors of all ages are invited to enjoy the show, which will start at sundown and be visible from anywhere on Folly Beach and for miles around.

The fireworks will be launched from 3rd Block West, and the parking and beach area there will be closed to visitors from 10 a.m. until 11 p.m.

Sea Stars and Stripes

7-10 p.m. July 4, South Carolina Aquarium, 100 Aquarium Wharf

This family-friendly and all-inclusive party at the aquarium will feature cookout fare, beer and wine. Guests are encouraged to bring chairs or blankets to watch fireworks from the decks overlooking the Charleston Harbor.

Tickets, which are $75 for adults, $40 for kids 3-12 and free for kids under 3, are available at scaquarium.org/events/sea-stars-stripes-070422.

Carolina Girl Fourth of July Cruise

8-11 p.m. July 4, St. John’s Yacht Harbor, 2408 Maybank Highway

A sunset cruise and views of the Charleston Harbor fireworks are in store aboard the Carolina Girl yacht. The adults-only event will include unlimited beer and wine and a DJ and music for the three-hour ride. No pointy heels are allowed on the yacht.

Boarding begins at 7:45 p.m., and tickets cost $135 per person. They can be purchased at eventbrite.com/e/the-carolina-girl-4th-of-july-firework-cruise-tickets-295225145357.

BBQ and Fireworks at The Watch Rooftop

7-11 p.m. July 4, The Watch Rooftop Kitchen & Spirits, 79 Wentworth St.

For dinner with a view, there’s a downtown option at The Watch. Attendees will be served a classic BBQ menu with a server and buffet dinner from 7-11 p.m. on the rooftop, where fireworks can be seen lighting up the Charleston sky.

Tickets start at $85 and can be bought at eventbrite.com/e/4th-of-july-tickets-324882009837. Alcoholic beverages will be an additional cost.

Sea to Shining Sea Concert

6-7 p.m. July 7, Gibbes Museum of Art, 135 Meeting St.

If you have to work on Independence Day weekend, then consider catching this event later in the week at the Gibbes Museum of Art. The Sea to Shining Sea: A New Muse Concert will display foot-tapping fiddle tunes and traditional folk songs in coalescence with an exhibition of William Eggleston’s photographs of rural America. The concert will investigate how the everyday becomes art and how a contemporary Southerner and romantic Czech composer translate the sights and sounds of America. Performers are Jennifer Higdon of Southern Harmony and Antonín Dvo?ák of American Quartet.

To register, visit gibbesmuseum.org/programs-events/sea-to-shining-sea-a-new-muse-concert/682. Tickets are $40 for non-members, $30 for members and $15 for students and faculty with a valid ID.

Gators’ Moore taking on leadership role

Sitting out a possession, Drew Moore watched a teammate heave a long touchdown pass then sprinted across the grass to celebrate with the receiver in the end zone. To Moore, this little moment in a meaningless 7-on-7 game was far from meaningless.The Goose Creek High School senior quarterback’s actions and words carry more weight than ever as a new season approaches. Gone from the 2021 squad is the two-time Region 7-AAAAA player of the year, a Div. I offensive lineman and two of the best receivers in the Lowcountry.Moore, ...

Sitting out a possession, Drew Moore watched a teammate heave a long touchdown pass then sprinted across the grass to celebrate with the receiver in the end zone. To Moore, this little moment in a meaningless 7-on-7 game was far from meaningless.

The Goose Creek High School senior quarterback’s actions and words carry more weight than ever as a new season approaches. Gone from the 2021 squad is the two-time Region 7-AAAAA player of the year, a Div. I offensive lineman and two of the best receivers in the Lowcountry.

Moore, a returning all-region pick, will be the trigger man again for the Gators.

“You get a little more leeway as a sophomore,” Moore said. “I know as a senior there’s little room for error, especially from the mental side of it. Every rep counts. Every snap counts. Every play counts. You can’t make mistakes.”

Moore is embracing the lofty expectations of a third-year starter. They are going to be there anyway so he might as well meet them head on. Goose Creek coach Jason Winstead called his veteran quarterback one of the team’s hardest workers.

“I kind of like being in the role of the one who everybody looks at,” Moore said. “I can play that role. I can be the leader everybody needs. There’s definitely a difference in being a sophomore starter versus a senior starter. You realize the importance of putting in the work every day. You can’t take a day off if you want to be a region champion, a state champion and win 10 games in a season.”

Moore threw for 2,552 yards and 27 touchdowns as a junior and 1,717 yards and 18 touchdowns as a sophomore. He’s aiming to take another step forward.

The Gators will lean on Moore a bunch early while they get the running back situation figured out and break in a few new players around their signal caller. Running back Demetri Simmons amassed over 3,000 yards and 33 touchdowns the last couple seasons. He’s at South Carolina State along with offensive lineman Jayden Johnson.

Receivers Khyon Smith and James Levine moved on, too, after hauling in 91 passes and 21 touchdowns for almost 1,700 yards last fall.

“He’s going to have to figure it out,” Winstead said. “We’re going to have to figure it out. He knows it. The last couple years, teams geared up to stop Demetri. It opened up a lot of things for Drew. Now, the goal is going to be to stop Drew. He’s going to have to be patient and take what teams give us. He’ll have to let the plays come to him until we learn to run the football better.”

Moore and Winstead believe the pieces will all come together when it’s time, though. They’ve seen the effort in the weight room and think there is more talent in the locker room than some people know. It’s not hurt the Gators picked up a transfer from Berkeley High School, receiver Troy Reid.

Reid was an all-region pick for the Stags as a junior.

“Building that new chemistry is something you’ve got to take on and learn,” Moore said. “I feel like we’ve done a good job with that this summer.”

The first official practice is set for July 29, with scrimmages and jamborees allowed Aug. 4.

Squads can open up the regular season on Aug. 19, and the Gators open up at home against South Florence. The Gators head to Sumter Sept. 2 and Beaufort Sept. 9.

It’s a tough stretch but Moore has been here before.

“He just keeps getting better,” Winstead said. “It’s nice to have a leader on the field. He’s the point man on offense. He knows where everybody is supposed to be. He can make all the throws. He’s one of our hardest workers. Like every quarterback, he’s got to take care of the ball.”

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