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If you are always in pain and have given up on your doctor's suggested therapies, we've got great news - a permanent solution to your back and foot pain may be closer than you might think.

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At Daniel Island Spine & Disc Center, our doctors are not just experts. They're people, too, and understand how pain and back problems can be crippling. Our goal is to get you well as soon as possible, without drugs or surgeries. That way, you can get back to a normal, healthy living for years to come.

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Our office offers a robust range of chiropractic services in Daniel Island, from custom shoe insoles for your feet to adjustments and massages for your back.

Daniel Island Spine & Disc Center: Treating More Than Symptoms

Are you looking for a chiropractor in Daniel Island, SC who treats more than just symptoms? If you're sick of chiropractic services that aren't tailored to your needs and body, it's time to make a change. Our expert chiropractors at Daniel Island Spine & Disc Center focus on your needs, not an idealized version of you. From chiropractic adjustments to custom shoe inserts and spinal decompression, we have the services and treatments you need to live life to the fullest.

Ready to live your best life free of pain? Contact our office today or explore our site to learn more about the Daniel Island Spine & Disc Center difference. We want you to feel comfortable knowing that you will be treated with care, compassion, and excellence every time you visit our office.

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Give wisely to charities this holiday season; consider ‘Angels’ of 2022

Each year South Carolina Secretary of State Mark Hammond announces the Angels organizations honored for demonstrating good stewardship of charitable resources in South Carolina.The Angels of 2022 recognized, with the percentage of their expenditures that went toward their program services, are listed at the end of this article.The Angels were selected by review of financial reports submitted annually to the Secretary of State’s Office, as well as by nominations from the public. To be selected as an Angel, the charity must...

Each year South Carolina Secretary of State Mark Hammond announces the Angels organizations honored for demonstrating good stewardship of charitable resources in South Carolina.

The Angels of 2022 recognized, with the percentage of their expenditures that went toward their program services, are listed at the end of this article.

The Angels were selected by review of financial reports submitted annually to the Secretary of State’s Office, as well as by nominations from the public. To be selected as an Angel, the charity must have devoted 80% or more of its total expenditures to charitable programs; must have been in existence for three or more years; must make good use of volunteer services; must receive minimal funding from grants; must have a significant presence in South Carolina; and must be in compliance with the South Carolina Solicitation of Charitable Funds Act. Each year the Secretary of State’s Office attempts to showcase Angels with diverse missions from several areas around the state.

“Charities do so much for our communities, and I am proud to recognize these wonderful organizations that have made a difference in the lives of so many South Carolinians,” Hammond said.

Prior to recognizing the 2022 Angels, Secretary Hammond released the 2021-22 Wise Giving Report as part of International Charity Fraud Awareness Week in October. This report provides wise giving tips for donors and includes data from professional solicitor contracts and joint financial reports filed with the Secretary of State’s Office. Furthermore, the Wise Giving Report includes the 2022 Give Smart Watch List, which names 10 charities registered to solicit in South Carolina that have reported spending less than 40% of their expenses on charitable programs.

“South Carolina is one of the most generous states in the nation, and this year’s Angels exemplify how this generosity can transform the lives of others,” Hammond said. “As we enter the holiday season, I encourage everyone to give back to their communities in any way that they can, whether it be through making a donation or volunteering their services. As always, remember to give from the heart, but please give smart.”

Charitable donors may research charities registered in South Carolina by visiting the Secretary of State’s website at sos.sc.gov. To look up a charitable organization, select the Charities Search feature to learn a charity’s total revenue, program expenses, total expenses, net assets, and fundraiser costs, as well as the percentage of total expenses that the charity has spent on program services. You can also call the Division of Public Charities at 1-888-CHARITI (242-7484) or send an email to charities@sos.sc.gov for more information.

If you have concerns about a charitable organization, professional fundraiser, or raffle, you can file a confidential complaint with the Secretary of State’s Office by using the online Charitable Solicitation Complaint Form.

Angel Charities 2022

(Listed in alphabetical order with % of expenditures toward program services)

? Cancer Association of Spartanburg & Cherokee Counties, Inc., Spartanburg - 93.2%

? Child Advocacy Center of Aiken County, Aiken - 85.2%

? Defenders For Children, Greenville - 91%

? Mercy Medicine Free Clinic, Florence - 95.6%

? Operation Home, Inc., North Charleston - 91.6%

? Programs for Exceptional People Inc., Bluffton - 91.1%

? Restore Mobility for the Blind, Lake Wylie - 94.1%

? Sharing God’s Love, Inc., Irmo - 92.3%

? The Dream Center of Pickens County, Easley - 95%

? The Village Group, Georgetown - 98.9%

Five concerts coming to Charleston in 2023

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – It won’t be much longer before Charleston feels like spring again – and with spring in the Lowcountry comes myriad events from the Southeastern Wildlife Expo to the Flowertown Festival, the Cooper River Bridge Run and the Credit One Charleston Open.But one thing people are always looking forward to when the warmer air arrives is enjoying live music from their favorite artists, or perhaps artists that bring back a nostalgic feeling.We saw plenty of big-name musicians make stops in the ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – It won’t be much longer before Charleston feels like spring again – and with spring in the Lowcountry comes myriad events from the Southeastern Wildlife Expo to the Flowertown Festival, the Cooper River Bridge Run and the Credit One Charleston Open.

But one thing people are always looking forward to when the warmer air arrives is enjoying live music from their favorite artists, or perhaps artists that bring back a nostalgic feeling.

We saw plenty of big-name musicians make stops in the Charleston area during their tours in 2022 Like Stevie Nicks, Miranda Lambert, Sheryl Crow, Elton John, and Darius Rucker, and 2023 is shaping up to be rather active as well.

Here are five upcoming concerts you won’t want to miss:

The “Empress of Soul,” Gladys Knight, will make a stop at the North Charleston Performing Arts Center in early spring. The “Midnight Train to Georgia” singer has been touring much of the U.S. in 2022 and will perform in North Charleston on March 2nd. (tickets)

Third Eye Blind, an American rock band who rose to fame in the 90s, will perform at the North Charleston Performing Arts Center as part of their ‘Summer Gods: 25 Years in The Blind’ tour on March 21. (tickets)

Best known for their emotional ballads, American vocal harmony group Boyz II Men will appear at the North Charleston Performing Arts Center on March 30th. (tickets)

Country music star Kenny Chesney will bring his ‘I Go Back Tour’ with Kelsea Ballerini to Daniel Island with a performance at Credit One Stadium on Thursday, May 25. (tickets)

American country music group Lady A (formerly Lady Antebellum) will perform at the Charleston Gaillard Center on June 24. (tickets)

BONUS: For those looking for the complete music festival experience, High Water Festival will return to North Charleston’s Riverfront Park on April 15 and 16. (tickets)

Hilton Head residents unite against Jonesville development, town working on a district plan

In recent months, residents along Jonesville Road have watched parts of their neighborhood — nestled between marshlands and trees laden with Spanish Moss, living symbols of Hilton Head’s unique environment — transform dramatically.Construction is underway to introduce Bailey’s Cove, a new housing development of 147 units on 29 acres, to the area. The once thickly forested lot has since been cleared, and the town is reviewing two other potential developments now. If both are approved, 96 more homes will be built...

In recent months, residents along Jonesville Road have watched parts of their neighborhood — nestled between marshlands and trees laden with Spanish Moss, living symbols of Hilton Head’s unique environment — transform dramatically.

Construction is underway to introduce Bailey’s Cove, a new housing development of 147 units on 29 acres, to the area. The once thickly forested lot has since been cleared, and the town is reviewing two other potential developments now. If both are approved, 96 more homes will be built.

Last fall, Driftwood Stables owner Sondra Makowski learned she would have to relocate after her landlord sold the plot that her business sits on to develop one of the neighborhoods.

Area residents are concerned the rapid expansion could harm the area’s natural beauty and damage the identity of the historic Jonesville neighborhood. They recently formed the Jonesville Preservation Society, and at the Jan. 3 Hilton Head Town Council workshop, society president Daniel Anthony urged the town to consider a moratorium on development in the area until the town can strengthen its land management guidelines.

“Jonesville Road is a very unique area on the island. It has the historic district, it has a lot historic knowledge, and they’re going to destroy it,” Anthony said.

Anthony is reaching out to residents beyond the Jonesville area to establish a broader coalition of citizens to slow development on the island, he said, including residents near Folly Field Road who are once again voicing opposition to the planned construction of a timeshare resort.

Beyond natural and aesthetic worries, residents say the road simply can’t support the amount of new drivers that 243 units could introduce. Jonesville already experiences severe congestion during mornings and after work hours, Anthony said, and he’s skeptical emergency services could access the area promptly during peak traffic hours.

Anthony’s moratorium request was echoed by other speakers, and received support from Ward 4 Councilwoman Tamara Becker.

“We are getting their attention. We just need to get enough of their attention to force them to do this moratorium,” Anthony said, “and prove to them, ‘Hey, I know you guys have reservations about this and we’re not against you. We’re working for Hilton Head.’”

Ward 3 Councilman David Ames also recognized weaknesses in the town’s land management ordinance that have allowed developments out of line with what islanders expect Hilton Head to be, he said.

“The attempt to rewrite the LMO has its basis in understanding and appreciation of what Charles Frazier was trying to preserve,” Ames said. “Unfortunately, certain developers have come into this community and used their practices from other communities to develop here on Hilton Head, and those two are in direct conflict of one another.”

At the workshop, Anthony said he doesn’t oppose all development but hopes the town will step in to create codes that encourage “orderly” growth.

At the same meeting, Assistant Town Manager Shawn Colin announced the town is beginning work this month on a Jonesville District plan to assess the area’s zoning code, existing infrastructure and more to “establish expectations” for future development. That plan, which Colin likened to the recently completed Mid-Island Initiative, could take six to nine months.

“In six to nine months, an awful lot can happen in terms of submission of development plans, and once that happens we have issues that we can’t resolve,” Becker said. “I’m asking — as has been suggested by folks here — we find out how we can, if possible, institute some sort of moratorium.”

The Island Packet reached out to Colin and Becker for further comment for this article but received no immediate response.

Anthony and the Jonesville Preservation Society have been promised a one-hour meeting with town officials soon, he said, the date still undetermined.

According to the Municipal Association of South Carolina, towns may impose a moratorium on development through ordinance, with six months considered a reasonable best-practice length. In the South Carolina Court of Appeals case Simpkins v. City of Gaffney, standards were established that a town should then actively research desired changes to land codes during the moratorium’s duration — consistent with Hilton Head’s plan to revise the Jonesville district.

“(A development moratorium) it is not the monster, the dinosaur, the evil thing that the town makes it out to be. This does not kill Hilton [Head], it protects Hilton Head,” Anthony said.

This story was originally published January 9, 2023 6:00 AM.

CHAMPIONSHIPS Pebble Beach Highlights 2023 USGA Championship Venues January 4, 2023 | Liberty Corner, N.J. By David Shefter, USGA

Some highly recognizable names and a few interesting newcomers highlight the venues hosting USGA championships in 2023. This year’s schedule features the western part of the country, with nine of the 15 championships to be contested in the Mountain or Pacific Time Zones, including the U.S. Open and U.S. Women’s Open Presented by ProMedica.Pebble Beach Finally Gets its U.S. Women’s OpenThat list begins with one of the world’s most iconic layouts: Pebble Beach. It has been coined the &ldquo...

Some highly recognizable names and a few interesting newcomers highlight the venues hosting USGA championships in 2023. This year’s schedule features the western part of the country, with nine of the 15 championships to be contested in the Mountain or Pacific Time Zones, including the U.S. Open and U.S. Women’s Open Presented by ProMedica.

Pebble Beach Finally Gets its U.S. Women’s Open

That list begins with one of the world’s most iconic layouts: Pebble Beach. It has been coined the “greatest meeting of land and sea,” and in July, the best female golfers on the planet will get the opportunity to showcase their talents on the Monterey Peninsula.

Pebble Beach, which hosted six memorable U.S. Open Championships starting with Jack Nicklaus’ triumph in 1972, is the site for the 78th U.S. Women’s Open Presented by ProMedica, from July 6-9. Only twice in its history has the USGA contested a women’s championship at Pebble Beach: the 1940 and 1948 U.S. Women’s Amateurs, won by Betty Jameson and Grace Lenczyk, respectively.

Since those two competitions, Pebble Beach has been the site of nine men’s USGA competitions: three U.S. Amateurs and the six U.S. Opens. Champions include Jack Nicklaus, Tom Watson, Tiger Woods and up-and-coming star Viktor Hovland. Few places can match its breathtaking views, especially the holes that hug the coastline.

Now the women get that stage.

“It’s my favorite place on earth,” said 2022 runner-up Mina Harigae, who grew up in the area and has played Pebble Beach at least 50 times.

U.S. Amateur Returns to Classic

Pebble Beach isn’t the only U.S. Open venue hosting a USGA championship in 2023. Cherry Hills Country Club just outside of Denver is the site of the 123rd U.S. Amateur. In 1960, Cherry Hills produced one of the more memorable U.S. Opens when Arnold Palmer rallied from a seven-stroke deficit, shooting a final-round 65 to claim his lone U.S. Open title, holding off four-time champion Ben Hogan and Nicklaus, the reigning U.S. Amateur champion. It remains the largest final-round comeback in U.S. Open history.

It was also where Birdie Kim holed out from a greenside bunker on the 72nd hole to win the 2005 U.S. Women’s Open over a pair of amateurs, Morgan Pressel and future U.S. Women’s Open champion Brittany Lang. And in 2012, Steven Fox emerged from a playoff to earn the No. 63 spot in the draw and defeated Michael Weaver in a dramatic 37-hole championship match.

2023 USGA Championship Venues

Los Angeles Back in the Spotlight

For the first time in 75 years, the U.S. Open is returning to Los Angeles as The Los Angeles Country Club hosts the 123rd iteration. In 1948, Hogan claimed the first of his four titles at The Riviera Country Club in neighboring Pacific Palisades. Both courses were designed by architect George C. Thomas, who also routed Bel-Air Country Club, which is the site for the 123rd U.S. Women’s Amateur in August.

LACC, which underwent a recent renovation by Gil Hanse, was the site for the 2017 Walker Cup Match. Multiple members of the victorious USA side are already exempt into this year’s U.S. Open, including two-time major champion Collin Morikawa, and 2022 U.S. Open runners-up, Scottie Scheffler and Will Zalatoris. Scheffler claimed his first major last April at the Masters.

First-Timers

Two courses are making their USGA championship debuts in 2023, headlined by the United States Air Force Academy Eisenhower Golf Club in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the U.S. Girls’ Junior. Originally scheduled to host in 2020 but postponed due to COVID-19, the Blue Course at the Eisenhower Golf Club will be the first military venue to host a USGA championship.

The other first-time venue is the Daniel Island Club in Charleston, S.C., site of the U.S. Junior Amateur Championship. Both the Ralston Creek and Beresford Creek Courses will be used for the stroke-play portion of the competition, with all the matches conducted on Ralston Creek, a Rees Jones design that opened for play in 2006.

More than 30,000 annuals are planted each year on the Flower Hole at SentryWorld, site of the 2023 U.S. Senior Open. (SentryWorld)

Seniors in the Spotlight

SentryWorld, in Stevens Point, Wis., is set to host the U.S. Senior Open, its third USGA championship since the Robert Trent Jones Jr. design opened in 1982. The daily-fee course will certainly challenge the best 50-and-over players as it did for the 1986 U.S. Women’s Amateur Public Links and 2019 U.S. Girls’ Junior. Its signature hole is the 16th, a par 3 that features more than 30,000 flowers that are planted each spring.

The 5th U.S. Senior Women’s Open goes to the West Coast for the first time as Waverley Country Club in Portland, Ore., hosts the event for the top 50-and-over female golfers. Waverley was the site of Woods’ last of three consecutive U.S. Junior Amateur titles in 1993, as well as where Lanny Wadkins won the 1970 U.S. Amateur. Members include 2004 U.S. Senior Open champion Peter Jacobsen and three-time U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur champion Lara Tennant.

Running it Back at Pinehurst No. 6

Pinehurst Resort & Country Club’s Course No. 6 will once again serve as the host site for the U.S. Adaptive Open. The competition was a rousing success in 2022 as 96 players with a variety of physical and intellectual impairments inspired the golf community with their remarkable performances last July. Simon Lee (male) and Western Michigan women’s golf coach Kim Moore (female) are expected to defend their respective titles.

Four-Balls Going Coast to Coast

The two Four-Ball competitions are being conducted at opposite ends of the country. The Home Course in DuPont, Wash., a public venue operated by the Pacific Northwest and Washington State Golf Associations, is hosting the 8th U.S. Women’s Amateur Four-Ball Championship. It previously was the host site for the final U.S. Women’s Amateur Public Links in 2014 and served as the stroke-play co-host for the 2010 U.S. Amateur and 2021 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball.

Kiawah Island (S.C.) Club will host the U.S. Amateur Four-Ball, with the River and Cassique courses serving as the stroke-play venues, with all the matches on the latter. The club was the site of the 2009 U.S. Mid-Amateur when Nathan Smith captured the second of his record four titles.

East Coast Venues on Tap for Mid-Ams

Speaking of the 25-and-over demographic, the U.S. Mid-Amateur is headed to Sleepy Hollow Country Club in Scarborough, N.Y. The C.B. Macdonald design, which hosted the 2002 U.S. Women’s Amateur, opened in 1913 and was recently renovated by Gil Hanse and George Bahto. Nearby Fenway Golf Club in Scarsdale, N.Y., will serve as the stroke-play co-host.

Stonewall, in Elverson, Pa., will host the U.S. Women’s Mid-Amateur seven years after Stewart Hagestad won a memorable U.S. Mid-Amateur final on the club’s Old and North Courses when he rallied to defeat 2014 champion Scott Harvey in 37 holes. This year, all the golf will take place on the North Course, a Tom Doak design that opened in 2003.

Senior Ams Head West

Martis Camp, in Truckee, Calif., and Troon Country Club, in Scottsdale, Ariz., also make their return to the USGA calendar for senior events. The U.S. Senior Amateur is set for Martis Camp in late August, a Tom Fazio design that hosted the 2013 U.S. Junior Amateur won by Scheffler. It is nestled at the base of the Northstar Ski Resort, giving members plenty of year-round activities.

Troon C.C. was Tom Weiskopf’s first foray into course design as he and partner Jay Moorish carved out a challenging desert layout that will test the U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur field. This is the first of two upcoming USGA championships for Troon C.C., which will also host the 2025 U.S. Mid-Amateur 35 years after Jim Stuart won the same title at the venue.

Daniel Island poised to see new $20M-plus hotel with restaurant, cottages and event space

A $20-million-plus lodging with a restaurant, event space and guest cottages is being proposed for Daniel Island.The city of Charleston’s Design Review Board recently signed off on plans for a 38-unit hotel at 1995 Daniel Island Drive near the planned 320-unit Nowell Creek Village Apartments.The site is across from the former Blackbaud headquarters building, which is now a multitenant office structure called Marshside. The board suggested a few aesthetic ...

A $20-million-plus lodging with a restaurant, event space and guest cottages is being proposed for Daniel Island.

The city of Charleston’s Design Review Board recently signed off on plans for a 38-unit hotel at 1995 Daniel Island Drive near the planned 320-unit Nowell Creek Village Apartments.

The site is across from the former Blackbaud headquarters building, which is now a multitenant office structure called Marshside. The board suggested a few aesthetic revisions, but otherwise unanimously voted for the hotel project.

A small office structure currently occupies the site and can be moved to make way for the new project once it clears other approvals from the city.

JT Industries LLC, an affiliate of developer King and Society Real Estate of Charleston, bought the 1.5-acre parcel near Beresford Creek in 2019 for $1.25 million, according to Berkeley County land records.

“We have a unique and interesting waterfront property on Daniel Island and have been working to find the best use and need for this location,” said King and Society founder and CEO Troy Barber.

He estimated construction will take about 14 months after permits and other approvals are received and hopes the project will be completed in 2024.

Barber said a firm price had not been set on the hotel, but he believes the project will be more than $20 million.

The main 11,200-square-foot building will house guest rooms, restaurant and event space in three floors over parking. The proposal includes four guest houses of 8,500 square feet each, two 866-square-foot cottages, two 592-square-foot cabanas and 50 parking spaces.

The site plan shows the venue as a likely wedding venue, with separate suites for the bride and groom, a ballroom and an outdoor ceremony site overlooking Beresford Creek. Barber said it could also be used for corporate functions.

King and Society will be the developer and handle construction as well, Barber said.

Top sellers

At the mid-year point, South Carolina is home to three of the top-selling 50 master-planned communities in the U.S., even as sales slow from last year.

RCLCO Real Estate Consulting ranked Cane Bay Plantation in Berkeley County at No. 5 with 525 sales during the first six months of 2022. That’s down 9 percent from last year’s midpoint.

Nexton, also in Berkeley, came in at No. 22 with 308 sales, down 5 percent from the first six months of last year.

Latitude Margaritaville in Hardeeville near Hilton Head Island ranked No. 39 with 234 sales, down 29 percent from last year from January through June.

The top-selling, master-planned community continues to be The Villages, between Ocala and Orlando, Fla. It had about 1,500 sales, down 25 percent from last year at the midpoint.

Almost all of the top 50 are in the southern tier of states. Texas posted the most with 20, Florida landed 15, Nevada had four, California and Arizona saw three each, and Utah and Washington state notched one each.

Total new home sales among the 50 top-selling master-planned communities declined by 18 percent in the first half of 2022 compared to the same time period last year, according to RCLCO.

“Supply chain issues and inadequate new home inventory have continued to pose problems for developers, as price increases and interest rate hikes have begun to impact traffic from potential buyers in recent months,” RCLCO said in its mid-year report.

Nationally, the average price among all new single-family homes is up 15 percent since mid-2021.

“The results of this updated mid-year report confirm that supply chain disruptions continue to have an impact on the ability of master-planned communities to meet new home demand, though climbing interest rates and price appreciation have begun to have an impact on that demand, at least in the near-term,” said RCLCO principal Karl Pischke.

“However, it is important not to overreact to the slowing of sales seen over the last year, as these are still short-term trends,” he said.

“The long-term future of the for-sale housing industry, as evidenced by favorable demographic tailwinds, is strong,” Pischke said. “And the future of master-planned communities, particularly in their ability to capture an outsized share of buyer demand during uncertain or difficult economic times, provides another reason for optimism.”

A long-struggling suburban Charleston shopping center that’s been partially converted into a health care and film production hub is under new ownership.

Citadel Mall announced Jan. 6 that Singerman Real Estate, a Chicago-based investment firm, has assumed full ownership of the West Ashley complex.

Terms were not disclosed.

Singerman’s financial interest in the mall dates back to April 2018, when an affiliated company provided an $8 million loan to the now-former owners, according to Charleston County mortgage records. The debt was secured by several separate parcels at the Sam Rittenberg Boulevard shopping center.

A Singerman representative did not respond Jan. 6 for further comment. Kristi Tolley, a spokeswoman for JLL, the management company for the mall, confirmed the transfer on behalf of the new ownership group.

She did not immediately respond for comment on Singerman’s plans for the shopping mall or if the transaction included all of the parts of the retail center that changed hands in recent years.

A deed had not been recorded with Charleston County as of Jan. 6.

Tolley said the mall will continue to be open daily and offer flexible leasing opportunities.

“We look forward to new and exciting activity to come with the support of new ownership,” she said in a written statement.

Richard C. Davis, broker-in-charge of West Ashley-based Trademark Properties, was among the buyers who paid $17 million in February 2017 for the interior portions of Citadel Mall, the region’s biggest shopping center based on square footage.

The investors then acquired the former J.C. Penney site in August 2017 for $5.125 million and the former Sears property in May 2018 for $7.55 million.

Davis did not immediately respond for a request for comment on the ownership change.

The 42-year-old shopping center encompasses about 1.1 million square feet of space, but not all of it is included in the recent transaction. Anchor tenants Belk, Dillard’s and Target own their properties outright.

The former Sears site is now used by a film production company, and the former J.C. Penney store is now occupied by the Medical University of South Carolina, which operates a 126,000-square-foot health care pavilion with on-site primary and specialty care clinics.

Together, the five big-box spaces on the wings make up 72 percent of the shopping center. The interior space accounts for 290,620 square feet.

The sprawling West Ashley shopping center never fully recovered following the deep recession in 2007 and 2008, which eventually led to Sears and J.C. Penney closing their big-box stores. Changing buying habits brought about in part with the advent of online shopping and buyers’ retreat from large indoor retail centers also played a part.

In 2013, the shopping center faced foreclosure after a previous owner, Chattanooga, Tenn.-based CBL Properties, began missing monthly mortgage payments on the balance of a $75 million loan it took out in 2007. In the interim, a judge appointed a receiver to manage the mall.

CBL Properties continues to own Northwoods Mall in North Charleston, which did not face the financial troubles of Citadel Mall.

Davis announced plans in 2019 to redevelop some of the land at the 90-acre retail site into a mix of uses that included multistory buildings. It was to be called Epic Center with future plans for hotels, residential units, offices, a grocer, recreation and parking decks on much of the outlying areas.

The plans have not materialized. It’s unclear if Singerman Real Estate plans to pursue the Epic Center idea.

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