Chiropractic Care in Daniel Island, SC

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At Daniel Island Spine & Disc Center, we offer our valued clients a wide range of chiropractic services that solve serious symptoms like:

Chiropractic Care Daniel Island, SC

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Chiropractic Care Daniel Island, SC

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Chiropractic Care Daniel Island, SC

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Chiropractic Care Daniel Island, SC

Herniated Discs

Chiropractic Care Daniel Island, SC

Degenerative Disc Disease

Chiropractic Care Daniel Island, SC

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Chiropractic Care Daniel Island, SC

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Chiropractic Care Daniel Island, SC

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Chiropractic Care Daniel Island, SC843-832-4499

If you are always in pain and have given up on your doctor's suggested therapies, we've got great news - a permanent solution to your back and foot pain may be closer than you might think.

As doctors and specialists, we hold true to our core values:

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We want you to feel comfortable knowing that from your first visit, you will be treated with the care and compassion you would expect from a team of professionals.

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At Daniel Island Spine & Disc Center, our doctors are not just experts. They're people, too, and understand how pain and back problems can be crippling. Our goal is to get you well as soon as possible, without drugs or surgeries. That way, you can get back to a normal, healthy living for years to come.

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We pair cutting-edge technology with advanced chiropractic services like spinal decompression to get your life back on track.

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If you find yourself in a situation where you need to see a chiropractor as soon as possible, we're here for you. Our chiropractors have treated thousands of patients, and we can treat you too.

Our office offers a robust range of chiropractic services in Daniel Island, from custom shoe insoles for your feet to adjustments and massages for your back.

Daniel Island Spine & Disc Center: Treating More Than Symptoms

Are you looking for a chiropractor in Daniel Island, SC who treats more than just symptoms? If you're sick of chiropractic services that aren't tailored to your needs and body, it's time to make a change. Our expert chiropractors at Daniel Island Spine & Disc Center focus on your needs, not an idealized version of you. From chiropractic adjustments to custom shoe inserts and spinal decompression, we have the services and treatments you need to live life to the fullest.

Ready to live your best life free of pain? Contact our office today or explore our site to learn more about the Daniel Island Spine & Disc Center difference. We want you to feel comfortable knowing that you will be treated with care, compassion, and excellence every time you visit our office.

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Latest News in Daniel Island, SC

Monkeypox infection confirmed in South Carolina

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) confirmed on Friday that two people in the state tested positive for monkeypox infection. One person is in the Midlands region and another person is in the Lowcountry region. The affected individuals will be monitored until they are no longer infectious to prevent spread of the virus and will be isolated if needed. Appropriate care will be provided as needed.“We understand residents have concerns about how this virus might impact our state,” s...

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) confirmed on Friday that two people in the state tested positive for monkeypox infection. One person is in the Midlands region and another person is in the Lowcountry region. The affected individuals will be monitored until they are no longer infectious to prevent spread of the virus and will be isolated if needed. Appropriate care will be provided as needed.

“We understand residents have concerns about how this virus might impact our state,” said Dr. Linda Bell, State Epidemiologist. “We expected infections to eventually occur in South Carolina as part of the larger international outbreak, which is why DHEC has been planning a response for weeks. That said, monkeypox doesn’t spread easily and we believe the risk to the general population remains low at this time.”

Midlands and Lowcountry regional epidemiology staffs are completing contact investigations and offering post-exposure vaccination to people exposed to the individuals who are infected, DHEC said in a press release. Those people also will be monitored to determine if they develop an infection. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been notified, DHEC said, and it continues to follow CDC guidance in the monkeypox response.

Monkeypox is a rare but potentially serious viral illness. The typical illness begins with flu-like symptoms and swelling of the lymph nodes that progresses to a rash on the face and body, however, many cases in the current outbreak do not have the typical onset and the rash may only appear on part of the body, DHEC explained. Most infections last two to four weeks.

Monkeypox is a reportable condition in South Carolina as a novel infectious agent. Healthcare providers are asked to notify DHEC of any patient that they suspect may have monkeypox to receive guidance about the recommended evaluation.

Monkeypox is not easily transmitted from person to person. It can be spread through prolonged face-to-face contact, skin-to-skin contact including sexual contact, and through contaminated materials (clothing or linens of an infected person).

If you are concerned that you have been exposed to someone with monkeypox infection or have a new, unusual rash, please seek medical attention from your usual healthcare provider, visit an urgent care center, or call your local health department.

Though the risk to the general population remains low, we encourage the public to inform themselves about monkeypox through reliable sources, including the DHEC website and the CDC website.

Hotel, restaurant and event space proposed along DI’s Beresford Creek

As Charleston continues to boom as an attractive destination for tourists and business, the expansion for hospitality in the Lowcountry becomes a high priority. Daniel Island may serve as a place of refuge by way of a newly proposed hotel, restaurant, event space and guest cottages.In June, Daniel Island’s Architectural Review Board approved the conceptual design of a proposed hotel at 1995 Daniel Island Dr. and on Monday evening the City of Charleston Design Review Board voted 6-0 to approve the same design with some aesthetic ...

As Charleston continues to boom as an attractive destination for tourists and business, the expansion for hospitality in the Lowcountry becomes a high priority. Daniel Island may serve as a place of refuge by way of a newly proposed hotel, restaurant, event space and guest cottages.

In June, Daniel Island’s Architectural Review Board approved the conceptual design of a proposed hotel at 1995 Daniel Island Dr. and on Monday evening the City of Charleston Design Review Board voted 6-0 to approve the same design with some aesthetic revisions.

Next up, the hotel will undergo a preliminary submittal process through the city’s Technical Review Committee prior to obtaining final permits.

A 1,536 square foot single floor office building constructed in 1996 currently sits on a portion of the 1.5 acre site. That building is occupied by Beatty Management, a property management firm. The existing site is slated to be demolished.

The hotel would be located across the street from the former Blackbaud headquarters and the Old Charleston Battery soccer stadium, which is the future site of a 320-unit multifamily apartment complex called Nowell Creek Village.

Over the past 20 years, the 1995 Daniel Island Dr. has been home to a myriad of businesses and island celebrations. The building was the original sales center for Daniel Island Real Estate. It also served as the location of the inaugural Blessing of Daniel Island in 1997 around Thanksgiving. Over the years, the site housed an art school (Daniel Island Music and Arts) and a chiropractor’s office.

In May 2019, the 1.5 acre parcel was acquired by JT Industries from the Daniel Island Inn for $1.25 million. The properties previous owners included the Daniel Island Company.

According to DRB Administrator David Meeks, the scope of the project is piecemealed into four sections: The main building is scaled to be 11,200 square feet and three stories tall and will serve as the hotel, restaurant and event space. Four guest houses are planned at 8,500 square feet each. Two two-story cottages will be 866 square feet each. And, two two-story cabanas will overlook the marsh on Beresford Creek at 592 square feet each.

The design calls for a total of 38 units, along with 50 parking spaces. The developer is local King and Society Real Estate and the architect is local Neil Stevenson Architects, acclaimed in 2008 for Best In American Living Award’s “Best Urban Smart Growth

The owner was contacted for comment but was not reached by the time of this article’s publication. The developer and the ARB declined to comment due to the preliminary nature of the project.

The earliest the hotel could obtain permits would be by the fall. Construction would not break ground until next spring if all goes according to plan.

Daniel Island pet portrait painter has an eye for detail

You know the look. The look when they need to go out. The look when they want to play. The look when their favorite person shows up or when they leave. You know the look in your pet’s eye, the silly way they sit or the curious way they tilt their head.Pet portrait painter Michele Levani focuses intently on the eyes of every loved animal she’s commissioned to paint and delivers a look of pure joy in the eyes of the owners when a painting is finished.From the age of 5, Levani had a love of drawing. “For me, draw...

You know the look. The look when they need to go out. The look when they want to play. The look when their favorite person shows up or when they leave. You know the look in your pet’s eye, the silly way they sit or the curious way they tilt their head.

Pet portrait painter Michele Levani focuses intently on the eyes of every loved animal she’s commissioned to paint and delivers a look of pure joy in the eyes of the owners when a painting is finished.

From the age of 5, Levani had a love of drawing. “For me, drawing was the start.”

Levani’s parents saw the love and cultivated it with classes. Not pick-up-a-crayon-and-color classes, but real art classes where she learned composition and the elements of perspective, depth and value. Levani studied voraciously so that now, 40 years into her life and a career as an artist, the accuracy and level of detail found in the pets she draws and paints shines through in each face.

“I consider myself a narrative artist,” Levani said. “I want to find the personality. My favorite thing ever to draw are eyes. There’s a story to tell and it’s in the eyes.”

Levani laughs and shares that she believes in the core strength of the eyes and face of her subjects so much so, that one time when a teacher tried to get her to turn her talents towards still life, she ended up drawing lips on her lemons and eyes on her apples. Levani is a prolific artist, contracted by a national pet brand, many months she produces 120 small works for pet owners nationwide. These small studies are not where she stops, though. Levani’s work is on display downtown at the only nonprofit gallery in Charleston, the Charleston Artist Guild. Among the 70-plus exhibiting members, Levani’s work with animals and people as subjects of admiration stand out as they combine equal parts precise and playful.

Levani feels at home alongside other “kindred spirits,” including Daniel Island residents Joyce Erb, Peter Finger and Betsy Jones McDonald who are also represented in the CAG East Bay gallery.Levani’s commission works come in all mediums and all sizes, from petite pen and ink drawings of pets on paper to perfect home-hung original paintings to large public art commissioned wall murals for Orvis, Ronald McDonald House and a recent collaboration with the South Carolina Aeronautics training center for Trident Technical College and Boeing.

“As an artist, I don’t want to get locked into rules,” Levani said about using just one type of medium or one particular size. She layers acrylics, inks, washes, watercolors and more. Artists, unlike our furry friends, don’t always obey. They are “rule breakers and trend-setters,” which makes this artist equally as lovable as the pets she paints. Pet lovers can visit the CAG in person downtown or view a comprehensive bio and commission pricing for Levani’s work on her website MicheleLevaniArt.com. You will also find a tab titled, “why it’s worth it all” which is the bright eyes of some very happy pet owners upon receiving her commissioned work in their forever home.

Heather MacQueen Jones is a Daniel Island artist journaling life’s journey through oil painting. Follow her stories on Instagram @heARTpalette or MacQueenJones.com.

DI resident, wildlife group rescue injured fawn

Is it ever a good idea to fawn over a deer? Yes – especially if it’s in need of help.Just ask Daniel Island resident Jim Wasson, who made an unexpected discovery while stepping out to get his morning newspaper on July 11. On his front porch, quietly sitting beneath his bench swing, was a small fawn – white spots and all.At first, Wasson thought maybe the baby deer had taken refuge there after thunderstorms had passed through the area. He figured his mother would be back to get him soon. But it didn’t tak...

Is it ever a good idea to fawn over a deer? Yes – especially if it’s in need of help.

Just ask Daniel Island resident Jim Wasson, who made an unexpected discovery while stepping out to get his morning newspaper on July 11. On his front porch, quietly sitting beneath his bench swing, was a small fawn – white spots and all.

At first, Wasson thought maybe the baby deer had taken refuge there after thunderstorms had passed through the area. He figured his mother would be back to get him soon. But it didn’t take long to realize there might be more to the story.

“I was watching it and I saw it get up and try to get down the stairs to the front yard and it was limping,” Wasson said. “… And then I saw part of its eye. The left eye was bruised like it was hit and so I said, ‘I’ve got to get this animal some help.’”

Wasson thought it may have been hit by a car – and he knew medical attention was needed. So he contacted the SCDNR office and was told there was not a deer rescue group in Berkeley County, but there were two in neighboring Dorchester and Charleston counties that might be able to help. One of them was a Summerville-based organization called Paws to Claws Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation, founded and operated by Elizabeth Joy Cockle. Wasson gave her a call and within an hour she was at his house.

“I was just happy to be there to help the poor fawn out,” Wasson said. “I was afraid if I didn’t do anything and it just limped away, predators would come after it.”

Wasson and Cockle worked to safely pick up the fawn, but that did not prove to be an easy task. It tried to flee through the porch railing and got its front two legs stuck. Wasson moved around to the front and pushed the legs back, where Cockle gently collected the animal with a blanket.

They loaded the fawn into Cockle’s van and she transported it to her home, where she helped nurse it back to health.

“He’s doing great!” Cockle reported, four days after the rescue. “He’s up walking around now so I am going to be taking and releasing him in another area… Once they start eating on their own, they are pretty much capable of doing whatever (they need to do). He’ll probably pick up with another herd.”

A longtime animal lover, Cockle started her wildlife rehabilitation business in January and has since helped care for over 100 animals, including squirrels, raccoons, opossums, and deer.

“I am getting more and more (requests for help), but it’s what I do and I love it!”

Chris Hamil, field operations manager for the Daniel Island Property Owners Association, said the POA office is receiving “more calls than normal” about deer out and about on the island.

“I remind people that prior to any development, this was a hunting preserve,” Hamil said. “The deer and the gators and the coyotes were all here way before us. So as development began and as it continues, the deer population has been pushed into different isolated areas.”

Captains Island has had the most reported sightings, added Hamil, who personally observed about a dozen or so deer in that area one evening while assessing the situation. The POA has a wildlife specialist on their team who helps to oversee and manage deer

populations in ways that are safe, ethical and efficient – and in compliance with all federal and state laws. In most cases on Daniel Island, residents call to report that deer are eating their landscape plantings.

“I empathize with folks that installed beautiful landscapes and are affected by the wildlife – I totally understand, but the most important thing I have to put at the forefront is the public safety,” Hamil added. “… It’s a balance and that’s what I’m trying to strive for – an equal balance, so the interactions with residents and wildlife are minimal at the least, and when there are interactions that they are safe.”

As far as tips for what to do if you discover a deer or a fawn on your property, Cockle has some advice.

“If it’s a baby just keep your eye on it and if the mom doesn’t come back within two days, call a rehabber,” Cockle added. “If they spot a big one, they can try to make noise and see if it runs away, if it doesn’t it’s possibly injured and you’ll need to call and have someone come out and check… And with babies, if they notice the ears are curled, and there are a lot of flies or ticks around it, then the mom hasn’t been there and is not taking care of it. That’s when you know it needs to be rescued.”

Beresford Creek Bridge replacement project delayed by permitting

The Beresford Creek Bridge replacement project was slated to be underway in June of this year. However, the bridge’s timeline is still in limbo and continues to stretch beyond its expected start and completion time frame.The bridge, road and hydraulic designs are 100% complete, according to the city’s Director of Public Service, Tom O’Brien. The only hold up right now is that the utility relocation permits are being reviewed by the Army Corps of Engineers and S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control’...

The Beresford Creek Bridge replacement project was slated to be underway in June of this year. However, the bridge’s timeline is still in limbo and continues to stretch beyond its expected start and completion time frame.

The bridge, road and hydraulic designs are 100% complete, according to the city’s Director of Public Service, Tom O’Brien. The only hold up right now is that the utility relocation permits are being reviewed by the Army Corps of Engineers and S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource management.

“There’s nothing we can do,” O’Brien said. “We’ve submitted all of the information and (the permits) are in que for review. We’re just kind of at their mercy… Unfortunately, we’re kind of in a waiting process.”

O’Brien noted that the permit status is being checked upon weekly at utility coordination meetings. He said the delay is not due to any complications but simply the volume of permits the agencies are currently processing.

Once the permits are approved, the city will initiate the bidding process and a contract will be awarded. O’Brien indicated that a typical bid period lasts up to 30 days.

Once the bidding is complete, construction is slated to take 8-10 months. During that time frame, which could start as early as this fall or late as winter or the beginning of 2023, the bridge will be fully shut down and untraversable for motorists, cyclists or pedestrians.

The newly constructed bridge will feature two 11-foot lanes and 4-foot shoulders and an 8-foot multi-use path. There are no changes to the $2.5 million project’s cost or other engineering specs. The funding for the project will come from the city’s general fund. Neither SCDOT nor Charleston or Berkeley County have any ownership in the project.

The bridge replacement’s goals include: replacing the load restricted bridge to allow un-restricted vehicle access; improving corridor bicycle and pedestrian mobility; minimizing environmental impacts by maintaining existing alignment and increasing opening below bridge for improved hydraulic flow.

However, the bridge’s replacement does come with an inconvenience fee to residents and commuters. The on and off ramps for I-526 East and West will be the only means of entering or leaving the island for business, recreation or emergency evacuation.

In 2019, an inspection conducted by the South Carolina Department of Transportation yielded findings of deterioration on one of the bridge beams. The weight limit was reduced to 10 tons per vehicle with 5 tons per axle. The original bridge, designed by Thomas & Hutton Engineering, was constructed in 1994-95 of concrete and timber.

After SCDOT’s assessment three years ago, which included an emergency installation of a steel plate for support, it was determined that it needed to be replaced within one to five years. Inspections have continued to occur monthly to ensure that the bridge is safe at its current load.

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