Chiropractic Care in Cottageville, SC

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At Cottageville Spine & Disc Center, we offer our valued clients a wide range of chiropractic services that solve serious symptoms like:

Chiropractic Care Cottageville, SC

Back Pain

Chiropractic Care Cottageville, SC

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Chiropractic Care Cottageville, SC

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Chiropractic Care Cottageville, SC

Herniated Discs

Chiropractic Care Cottageville, SC

Degenerative Disc Disease

Chiropractic Care Cottageville, SC

Foot Pain

Chiropractic Care Cottageville, SC

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Chiropractic Care Cottageville, SC843-832-4499

If you are always in pain and have given up on your doctor's suggested therapies, we've got great news - a permanent solution to your back and foot pain may be closer than you might think.

As doctors and specialists, we hold true to our core values:

Always There for You

Always There for You

We want you to feel comfortable knowing that from your first visit, you will be treated with the care and compassion you would expect from a team of professionals.

Compassionate Doctors

Compassionate Doctors

At Cottageville Spine & Disc Center, our doctors are not just experts. They're people, too, and understand how pain and back problems can be crippling. Our goal is to get you well as soon as possible, without drugs or surgeries. That way, you can get back to a normal, healthy living for years to come.

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Premium Facilities

We pair cutting-edge technology with advanced chiropractic services like spinal decompression to get your life back on track.

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Pain Relief Services

If you find yourself in a situation where you need to see a chiropractor as soon as possible, we're here for you. Our chiropractors have treated thousands of patients, and we can treat you too.

Our office offers a robust range of chiropractic services in Cottageville, from custom shoe insoles for your feet to adjustments and massages for your back.

Cottageville Spine & Disc Center: Treating More Than Symptoms

Are you looking for a chiropractor in Cottageville, SC who treats more than just symptoms? If you're sick of chiropractic services that aren't tailored to your needs and body, it's time to make a change. Our expert chiropractors at Cottageville Spine & Disc Center focus on your needs, not an idealized version of you. From chiropractic adjustments to custom shoe inserts and spinal decompression, we have the services and treatments you need to live life to the fullest.

Ready to live your best life free of pain? Contact our office today or explore our site to learn more about the Cottageville Spine & Disc Center difference. We want you to feel comfortable knowing that you will be treated with care, compassion, and excellence every time you visit our office.

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Latest News in Cottageville, SC

Who is most likely to get an abortion in South Carolina?

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (WBTW) — People between the ages of 25 and 29 make up the majority of those who obtain an abortion in the state, according to data from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control.There were 4,549 abortions reported to DHEC in 2020, according to a report released by the agency last summer. Numbers for 2021 have not yet been published.In 2020, the state saw...

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (WBTW) — People between the ages of 25 and 29 make up the majority of those who obtain an abortion in the state, according to data from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control.

There were 4,549 abortions reported to DHEC in 2020, according to a report released by the agency last summer. Numbers for 2021 have not yet been published.

In 2020, the state saw its fewest number of abortions since at least 2017.

Women between the ages of 25 to 29 make up 28.5% of those who obtain abortions in the state, followed by women between the ages of 20 and 24, at 28.5%.

A little more than half of all abortions performed in 2020 were at six weeks or less postfertilization, and 49.3% were between seven and 13 weeks. There has been only one abortion performed at 24 or more weeks during the last three years.

The most common method was medical abortion, which accounted for 3,090 of procedures in 2020. The second-most commonly used method was electrical vacuum aspiration, at 1,062.

The data was originally published amid an ongoing legal battle over the South Carolina Fetal Heartbeat and Protection from Abortion Act, which opponents said would essentially ban a majority of abortions in the state, as electrical activity can be detected at about six weeks postfertilization — before many women know that they’re pregnant.

The bill was passed by the state legislature and signed by Gov. Henry McMaster in February 2021, and immediately faced a legal challenge from abortion-rights groups, including the American Civil Liberties Union of South Carolina. The legal challenge currently remains in federal court, which has filed a preliminary injunction blocking the law.

According to a poll from the Pew Research Center, 48% of people in South Carolina think abortion should be legal in all or most cases. About 52% think it should be illegal in all or most cases, and 6% said they were undecided.

The organization released the results of a poll last year that said 59% of Americans think that abortion should be legal in all or most cases.

In 2018, a little more than half of abortions performed in the state were obtained by Black women, according to data published by the Lozier Institute. About 38% were obtained by white women.

Of those who received an abortion, 79% were unmarried, 12% were married and 9% did not have a marital status listed.

Nationally, 59% of abortions are obtained by women who have children, according to the Guttmacher Institute, and 49% are women who live below the poverty level. About 62% are people who identify as being religiously affiliated. Of those, 24% were Catholic, 17% were mainline Protestant, 13% were evangelical Protestant and 8% identified with another religion. Of the total women who obtained an abortion, 38% reported having no religious affiliation.

About one-fourth of the patients were living at 100-199% of the poverty level. About 91% had a high school diploma. About more than 20% had a college degree.

Chief Justice John Roberts confirmed Tuesday that a leak of a draft opinion that suggests the Supreme Court plans to overturn Roe v. Wade was authentic. He’s ordered an investigation into the matter, calling it an “egregious breach of trust.”

Roberts said the document does not represent a final decision or position of any member of the court.

Parents express concern over Colleton County Schools’ new bell schedule

WALTERBORO, S.C. (WCSC) - Some Colleton County elementary schoolers will have to be at the bus stop as early as 6 a.m. starting this school year, and parents are not happy.The district just announced its new bell schedule within a month of the first day of school, and it is already receiving backlash, especially on Facebook.The schools affected by the new bell schedule are listed below:7:00 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.- Bells Elementary School- Cottageville Elementary School- Hendersonville Elementary School...

WALTERBORO, S.C. (WCSC) - Some Colleton County elementary schoolers will have to be at the bus stop as early as 6 a.m. starting this school year, and parents are not happy.

The district just announced its new bell schedule within a month of the first day of school, and it is already receiving backlash, especially on Facebook.

The schools affected by the new bell schedule are listed below:

7:00 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.

- Bells Elementary School

- Cottageville Elementary School

- Hendersonville Elementary School

8:00 a.m. - 2:45 p.m.

- Northside Elementary School

- Forest Hills Elementary School

- Black Street Early Childhood Center

8:45 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

- Colleton County Middle School

9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

- Colleton County High School

Most parents say they do not want their elementary schoolers starting so early and their high schoolers ending so late.

Kevin Canaday, a father of three kids in Colleton County School District, says this is causing issues for parents who rely on childcare services after school. He says it is creating 11–12-hour days for elementary schoolers.

“Elementary schools K-4, K-5, first graders, who are getting their foundations of education and having them start this early in the day, so they’re getting out of school if I remember correctly is 1:45,” Canaday said. “So, by the time they get home, there’s really not going to be anyone there to help them with homework or anything like that because they’re getting home so early.”

William Bowman Jr., the chairperson for Colleton County Schools, says this change came from a shortage of bus drivers. He says the district should have 65 drivers, but they are short 15 for this school year.

He says Dr. Vallerie Cave, Colleton County Schools’ Superintendent, did not want bus drivers to be making triple or quadruple routes to fill in for the missing drivers. He says if they did this, it would result in kids not arriving at school until 10 or 11:00 in the morning.

“We’re seeing a lot of growth in all of our core subject areas across all of our grade levels,” Bowman Jr. said. “So, we want to continue with that academic progress, and a big part of that continuation is making sure that our students receive the proper instruction. And if students are getting to school at 10 or 11:00 in the morning, they’re missing a huge part of instruction.”

Bowman says he encourages everyone to apply to be a bus driver for Colleton County School District.

There will also be a school board meeting on Tuesday, July 26 at 6 p.m., where the board will explain more of why they made these changes.

The South Carolina Department of Education recently launched the “Step Up SC” campaign, which highlights open bus driver and technician positions across the state.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Cottageville store plays host to History Channel’s ‘American Pickers’

COTTAGEVILLE — Cottageville will have a national audience with a segment about a local general store on “American Pickers” this weekend.The former Hunt’s General Store will be featured at 9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8.Lawrence Otho Hunt opened a general store in the 1930s and his grandsons Brad and Bruce Hunt welcomed Mike and Robbie Wolfe of “American Pickers” to give them an opportunity to find antique treasures.“American Pickers” debuted in 2010 and is centered around Mark and...

COTTAGEVILLE — Cottageville will have a national audience with a segment about a local general store on “American Pickers” this weekend.

The former Hunt’s General Store will be featured at 9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8.

Lawrence Otho Hunt opened a general store in the 1930s and his grandsons Brad and Bruce Hunt welcomed Mike and Robbie Wolfe of “American Pickers” to give them an opportunity to find antique treasures.

“American Pickers” debuted in 2010 and is centered around Mark and, at the time, Frank Fritz, who travel to junkyards and antique stores all over the country to find valuables and collectibles to buy and resale.

The Hunt brothers were always fans of the show and Brad said he and their mother Dorothy would watch it together over the years. Dorothy passed away last January and after Bruce and Brad acquired the old business, Brad decided to reach out to the show.

Hunt’s general store was operational in Cottageville from about the 1930s to 1989. Grandsons of the original owner and founder were on the “American Pickers” show which airs this weekend. The bottom photo is a house next door to the store. (Photo Provided)

“We have a lot of old stuff that I’ve seen them buy and I thought they’d like to look through (it). We watched the show a lot (and) it kind of felt like (we) knew them before they got there. They were very personable. They were there to work; they were cordial,” Brad Hunt said.

Cottageville was one of two stops in West Virginia, and Brad said the episode will delve into his family’s history and grandfather’s legacy.

“A lot of them are excited about telling the backstory; that’s a lot of the show on top of them buying and reselling stuff,” Brad Hunt said.

Lawrence “L.O.’s” store was a catch-all place that sold milk, groceries, hardware, guns, appliances and clothing. It was also a butcher shop.

“Those were common back then. There were not Walmarts, and every little community had its own little store that had everything,” Brad Hunt said.

L.O. ran the store until his passing in the ’90s, except when he was serving in World War II, during which time his brothers worked in his place. L.O. was a postmaster in the Navy and Cottageville, and his store was also the local post office at the time.

“He was the judge, jury and executioner; he kind of ran the town. He was a community servant,” Brad Hunt said.

Going forward, Brad says he and Bruce want to use the space as a man cave where they can store tools, work on projects and spend time together.

“We’re going to use a lot of the old stuff for decoration,” he said.

Mark Whitley, director of Jackson County Economic Development, said he’s looking forward to watching the episode since he’s a huge fan of the show.

“I never try to miss an episode and when they come into a community, it opens up our eyes to different parts of the country that we normally wouldn’t have the opportunity to see,” Whitley said. “Any kind of exposure we can get from this is going to be very beneficial.”

Whitley said Jackson County has a rich history and he’s grateful for the Hunt brothers’ work to be featured on the show.

“Jackson County residents have so many interesting treasures, I think they could spend quite a few days here and not even scratch the surface for the things that would be of interest to the national population,” he said.

When “American Pickers” features a piece of Jackson County history, Brad Hunt hopes people across the nation will learn something about the community’s culture.

“I wish my mother was still alive to be able to see it and participate. It was a fun experience and we hope everybody enjoys getting a little history lesson of the little town of Cottageville and our grandfather,” he said.

The show airs 9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8, on the History Channel.

Candice Black can be reached at cblack@newsandsentinel.com.

Deputies make arrests after body found in Cottageville woods

Deputies make arrests after body found in Cottageville woods where hunter went missingCOLLETON COUNTY, SC (WCSC) - Investigators have made a number of arrests after a body was found in the woods in Cottageville in the same area where a hunter went missing.The Colleton County Sheriff’s Office says 25-year-old Schuyler Rene Andrulat of Cottageville and 33-year-old Nathan Baughman of Summerville have been charged with obstruction of justice. According to court records, the charges against Andrulat were dismissed and expunged...

Deputies make arrests after body found in Cottageville woods where hunter went missing

COLLETON COUNTY, SC (WCSC) - Investigators have made a number of arrests after a body was found in the woods in Cottageville in the same area where a hunter went missing.

The Colleton County Sheriff’s Office says 25-year-old Schuyler Rene Andrulat of Cottageville and 33-year-old Nathan Baughman of Summerville have been charged with obstruction of justice. According to court records, the charges against Andrulat were dismissed and expunged.

A third man, Brad Skipper, has also been charged with an outstanding warrant from Colleton County.

The body was found around 8 p.m. on Thursday in a wooded area off Red Oak Road, the same area where a hunter went missing last Friday

The sheriff's office says the missing hunter was staying with friends who waited until Sunday to report him missing.

The coroner is doing an autopsy to determine the cause of death and identify the body.

The arrests stems from an incident that began on Aug. 21 when a Colleton County deputy responded to a home on Peirce Road in reference to a missing person.

The deputy spoke to Andrulat who said a friend of hers, Orin Patrick, had come to her home to go hunting Friday evening.

According to a report, Andrulat said she dropped Patrick off along the woodline on Peirce Road with a shotgun.

"Andrulat stated that several hours later, she received a call from Patrick stating that he was lost in the woods and he wanted her to drive along the road and beep the horn so that he could find his way back to the road again," the report states.

Andrulat told investigators that she did this around 9 p.m. on Friday but could not find him.

According to authorities, Andrulat said she received another call from Patrick that only last a few seconds and had since been unable to reach him through his phone again. Andrulat told deputies that she did not know any more information about Patrick.

In the incident report, the responding deputy reported that when he first met with Andrulat, she was unable to give any information about Patrick. The deputy then told Andrulat to get in contact with some of Patrick's friends or family so that he could get enough information to do a report.

Authorities also spoke with Patrick's friend, Baughman, who told investigators over the phone that he and Patrick had been staying at a home on Lakeview Drive in Summerville.

Baughman said the last time he saw Patrick was on Aug. 19, but was unsure of the time "because they had both been drinking so he did not remember much about that day."

The incident report states Baughman told investigators that this was not the first time Patrick had just "gone away, but it has never been for this long and never without making contact with him."

Detectives reported that they had Patrick's cell phone pinged to find the last location for it which was in Summerville.

Copyright 2016 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Walterboro voters have poll location changes in Nov. 2nd elections

Some polling locations in Walterboro have temporarily changed for the upcoming municipal election.Two former precincts in Walterboro – Walterboro No. 4 and Walterboro No. 5 – have combined, sending voters from these two precincts to the Colleton County School District headquarters to cast their ballots on the Nov. 2nd.Formerly, voters from Walterboro No. 4 used Forest Hills Elementary School as a precinct location and voters in Walterboro No. 5 used Colleton County Middle School. Now, the school district headquarter...

Some polling locations in Walterboro have temporarily changed for the upcoming municipal election.

Two former precincts in Walterboro – Walterboro No. 4 and Walterboro No. 5 – have combined, sending voters from these two precincts to the Colleton County School District headquarters to cast their ballots on the Nov. 2nd.

Formerly, voters from Walterboro No. 4 used Forest Hills Elementary School as a precinct location and voters in Walterboro No. 5 used Colleton County Middle School. Now, the school district headquarters is the go-to spot for voters from Walterboro Precincts 4 and 5.

Because of a miscommunication with the school district regarding this year’s election, schools are open on this year’s election date. Next year, local voting officials anticipate that schools will be closed for the November election, allowing schools to once again be used as a poll site.

Absentee in person begins Monday, October 4.

On this election-day ballot is current and longtime Mayor Bill Young, who is being opposed by mayoral candidates Chrissy Johnson and Alex Cavazzori.

Voters will also be choosing city council candidates in the Nov. 2nd Walterboro municipal election. City council candidates are incumbents Carl Brown, Greg Pryor and James Broderick.

Walterboro is one of several municipalities in Colleton County that are holding elections on Nov. 2nd. Please see below for the full list of formal candidates that have filed to run in each of these towns.

Each of these municipalities will hold their respective elections on November 2nd. The elections are non-partisan, meaning there is no political affiliation on the ballot.

Any run-off elections for these municipalities will be held two weeks after the election on Tuesday, November 16, 2021.

Cottageville

In Cottageville, two candidates have officially filed to run for town council - Elizabeth A. Green and Jay W. McGrew. Only one candidate – Walter “Will” Williams, Jr. – has filed to run for an unexpired council term.

Election Day voting will be held at the Cottageville Elementary School, located at 648 Peirce Road in Cottageville.

Lodge

In Lodge, two people have filed to run for the town’s mayoral seat: Larry M. Carter, Sr. and Richard C. Smith. Candidates who have filed to run for Lodge Town Council are Brenda Connelly, E. Richard “Bo” Ryan, Rose S. Varnadoe and Christy C. Terry.

Election Day voting will be held at the Colleton County Fire-Rescue Station No. 3, located at 8667 Lodge Highway in Lodge. The poll opens at 7:00 a.m. at this location on election day and will remain open until 7:00 p.m.

Smoaks

In Smoaks, two people have filed to seek a seat on town council: James C. “Jimmy” Avant, Jr. and William “Ty” Barnes.

Election Day voting in Smoaks will be held at the Colleton County Fire-Rescue Station No. 7, located at 27250 Lowcountry Highway in Smoaks.

The poll opens at 7:00 a.m. and will remain open until 7:00 p.m.

Only people who live within the town limits of Smoaks can run for office.

Edisto Beach

Edisto Beach has two open seats for its town council. Filing for these council seats has ended, and the candidates who have filed to run for these two council seats are James “Jay” R. Watts II and Robert “Bob” N. Renner.

Only one candidate has filed to run for the town’s mayoral seat and that is current interim mayor Crawford Moore, who was appointed to fill the term of longtime Mayor Jane Darby, who resigned mid-term earlier this year on August 5th.

The Edisto election will happen at Edisto Beach Town Hall, located at 2414 Murray Street at Edisto Beach. The polls will be opened at 7:00 a.m. and will close at 7 p.m. This is a non-partisan election and no party affiliation shall be placed on the ballot.

Registering to Vote

Any resident who wants to vote in an upcoming election and who is not yet registered to vote can do so now. The voter registration deadline for these elections Oct. 3rd.

To register, visit the Voter Registration & Elections Office at 2471 Jefferies Hwy, Walterboro, SC 29488 or register online at www.scVotes.gov.

Voter registration by mail applications will be accepted if postmarked by Monday, October 4.

Absentee ballots may be requested now from the Colleton County Voter Registration and Elections Office by calling 843-549-2842. Anyone wanting to cast their absentee ballot in person can do this beginning Monday, Oct. 4th by going to local Voter Registration & Elections Office, which is located at 2471 Jefferies Highway in Walterboro. Absentee ballots done in person will continue from October 4 until 5:00 p.m. on the day before the election.

The elections office is open Monday-Friday, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

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Kayaking the Edisto River — South Carolina’s natural hidden treasure in the Lowcountry

“Hold still, little bird,” I muttered to myself as I squinted through the viewfinder of my camera. Despite my command, the bird refused to stay put on the branch as I tried to focus long enough to release the shutter. With a click I was the owner of yet another high-definition digital photo of … an empty tree branch.The object of my frustration on this day is a bright yellow prothonotary warbler, a migratory songbird that thrives in the flooded woodlands of the swampy rivers of the South Carolina Lowcountry....

“Hold still, little bird,” I muttered to myself as I squinted through the viewfinder of my camera. Despite my command, the bird refused to stay put on the branch as I tried to focus long enough to release the shutter. With a click I was the owner of yet another high-definition digital photo of … an empty tree branch.

The object of my frustration on this day is a bright yellow prothonotary warbler, a migratory songbird that thrives in the flooded woodlands of the swampy rivers of the South Carolina Lowcountry.

Wintering in South America, the prothonotary warbler can be found in spring and summer in the Carolinas where breeding pairs can be spotted in trees along the riverbank or deep in the swamp. Its song is a bright twee-twee-twee-twee and as it darts among the low branches above the black water of a swamp, it seems to almost demand a photo.

This spring morning, as I paddle a quiet stretch of the Edisto River, a warbler darts among the branches of a low willow hunting snails and insects. With its yellow colors flashing like a lightning bug in daytime, I am compelled to stop once again and fill the memory card on my camera with photos of tree branches in an obsession that seems to amuse the little bird. Finally, both of us are relieved as I obtain a photo or two and both of us depart satisfied from the encounter.

The subject of my photo lives with others of his kind along one of the most beautiful stretches of the Edisto River that you can ever see. The Edisto River is the longest river system contained entirely in South Carolina. Rising from Saluda and Edgefield counties, the Edisto corkscrews 250 miles along the Lowcountry to the sea and forms the “E” of the critical ACE Basin water system.

Artesian wells and crystal clear springs bubble from the limestone bedrock along the upper river and near the coast it becomes a rich, blackwater river where deep swamps open to salt marsh horizons. To spend time kayaking or boating along the Edisto is to experience a special paradise on earth.

This section of warbler-haunted Edisto described above runs approximately seven miles from Good Hope Landing to Sullivan’s Ferry near Cottageville. Good Hope Landing is a beautiful, easily accessible boat landing that allows you easy access to the river. Its 10-foot sandy bluff is crowned by a majestic live oak and the river here is wide and relatively straight.

As the current carries you along you can spot an abundance of wildlife. Egrets and herons wade in the shallows, songbirds (including prothonotary warblers) inhabit the trees and in the water, terrapin, gar and even the elusive alligator can be spotted. The river is filled with redbreast bream, catfish and bass — making this a popular as a destination for anglers.

A few miles downstream there is a narrow portion, where willows grow close and fallen trees can snag unwary boaters or those floating along in innertubes, a favorite summer pastime for hundreds of visitors every year. At four miles, you will pass Long Creek Landing, another serviceable launching location, and shortly after will pass beneath the highway bridge of U.S.-17A at the privately owned Jellico’s Landing.

Up to this point, the Edisto has been wild and scenic with few houses or other reminders of human habitation. From the bridge at Jellico’s, well-sited river houses and cottages line the river and form the community of Sullivan’s Landing. Dating from at least as far back as 1820, Sullivan’s was one of many such river crossings in the Lowcountry before bridges and modern highways took hold. The 1820 record of the South Carolina state legislature reveals that the toll for Sullivan’s Ferry was “for every two-horse carriage, 50 cents … horse and rider, 10 cents, and 5 cents for every foot passenger and head of horses, mules, cattle, sheep, goats and hogs …”

Recently, I kayaked from Good Hope to Sullivan’s Ferry with a group of friends and we found the old ferry site to be far quieter that it might have been in 1820. We enjoyed a beautiful spring day with the smooth Edisto reflecting the deep blue of a sky filled with lazy clouds. Recent rains had raised river levels and we enjoyed exploring side channels into coves of swampy flooded forest and hidden oxbow lakes.

After many hours leisurely exploring and encountering wildlife, we arrived at Sullivan’s Ferry for the journey home. We were all of the opinion that this section of the Edisto River was the most beautiful we had ever encountered — and I am certain that you will feel the same way. Should you chance to encounter a little yellow bird in a willow tree, I am certain he will share his opinion of the river, too.

Good Hope Landing and Sullivan’s Ferry Landing are both located near Cottageville and are only a little over an hour’s drive from the Beaufort area. To get there, take Interstate 95 or U.S.-17-A to Walterboro and stay on 17-A to Cottageville. In Cottageville, turn left onto Pierce Road. At 4 miles, turn right onto State Road S-15-35 to the dead end at Good Hope Landing. Sullivan’s Ferry is located at the end of Sullivan’s Ferry Road approximately 3 miles from Cottageville just off 17-A. Both landings are managed by the South Carolina DNR and are well-maintained. There are no facilities, so pack accordingly.

The river in this section is swift when the water is up but very easy to manage, despite a few areas of overhang and snags. Careful preparation and good company will ensure you have a safe, enjoyable day on the water.

For more information, visit the Edisto River Canoe and Kayak Trail site at https://ercktrail.org or obtain a detailed map at https://www.dnr.sc.gov/water/river/edisto-guide.html

Blue Collar grows in spite of Covid

It’s hard to believe that anything good could come from the pandemic, but for one couple, something good did come out of it - a thriving business.Florida natives April and Aaron Williamson moved to Summerville, SC after they married 16 years ago. Finding the town “drastically changing,” they moved to Cottageville near the Edisto River. The family visited it the same day they saw the ad and bought it just weeks later.Aaron is a SC Dual Licensed Optician, but has a background in financial services. He also worked in sales, se...

It’s hard to believe that anything good could come from the pandemic, but for one couple, something good did come out of it - a thriving business.Florida natives April and Aaron Williamson moved to Summerville, SC after they married 16 years ago. Finding the town “drastically changing,” they moved to Cottageville near the Edisto River. The family visited it the same day they saw the ad and bought it just weeks later.Aaron is a SC Dual Licensed Optician, but has a background in financial services. He also worked in sales, served as a regional sales trainer, recruiter and was eventually vice president of Branch Development. Now, he writes children’s books. April is vice president of marketing for Cornerstone Advisory Group in Summerville, but she has a background in web design, writing and business consultation. In their professional lives, they have worked for fortune 100 businesses with big problems to solve, as well as small, upstart family-owned businesses. Those experiences taught them the value of effective communication, solid branding and creativity.“After years of sharing our experience with our employers, we decided it was time to go directly to our customers with our talent, to make ourselves more accessible, more effective and to allow us to work together as a husband-and-wife team to grow our business,” said Aaron.Aaron and April decided to go into business for themselves and meet the needs of Colleton County businesses, as well as online business that need help to expand and have a better online presence.For new businesses, timing is everything.Ironically, the Williamsons found themselves opening the doors of Blue Collar Marketing, only to find the pandemic spreading out of control across the nation before they could even cut the ribbon. Worried that this might affect their business goals, the Williamsons pushed harder and focused on creating close relationships with customers and helping them develop new ways to generate revenue and become more competitive.Because so many employers and employees were working from home during the pandemic, the computer became a vital tool for everyone. Employers were eager to find other ways to do business rather than owning a storefront.This desire for finding alternative business plans drove many customers to Aaron and April who readily assisted them in finding new pathways to market themselves.Surprisingly, the Williamsons found themselves flooded with work, even during Covid.During the pandemic, Blue Collar Marketing has now added three remote designers and two writers who assist with larger projects.“Frankly, we aren’t interested in growing Blue Collar to the point where we can’t put eyes on everything that goes out the door,” Aaron said. “What we enjoy the most is meeting new business owners, learning their industry, and figuring out how to place them to be competitive. Helping owners either grow their businesses or bring them to life is the fun part,” he added.The Williamsons were eventually able to meet their next-door neighbors in Cottageville and found to their amazement that the property owners were needing assistance marketing their new project… an alpaca farm.Aaron and April worked with Herd it Here Farm on Sullivans Ferry Rd. in Cottageville to prepare for their grand opening. That project included creating a website, marketing materials and consultations. Then, they showed the owners how to take charge of the project and continue the marketing strategy themselves.“Once we learn your business and what makes you different, we plug you into our protocols and execute what we’ve designed. We also teach our customers as much as we can about what we do, so they can be more confident in marketing for themselves instead of being locked into a never-ending contract,” said Aaron.The Williamsons say they have a simple goal for Blue Collar Marketing. “We want to make the path to a solution as easy and affordable as possible and ensure that businesses move on with tools and confidence to keep going and growing. “We want to leave them more profitable and optimistic than when we met,” said Aaron.“I think a lot of people don’t know there is a specialty marketing company right here in their backyard. We want to help businesses grow while remaining a small, family owned, and local business right here in Colleton County.”

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Horses endangered in Colleton with positive cases of EEE and West Nile

The contagious Eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) virus has once again been found in Colleton County, with one horse testing positive for the disease in rural Colleton County and another horse testing positive for West Nile virus. The location of the positive case of EEE is not being disclosed, at the request of the horse owner. The positive case of the West Nile virus in a horse is in Cottageville. Local animal control officials say they are hoping to stop the virus in the entire county by providing additional mosquito spraying: the E...

The contagious Eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) virus has once again been found in Colleton County, with one horse testing positive for the disease in rural Colleton County and another horse testing positive for West Nile virus. The location of the positive case of EEE is not being disclosed, at the request of the horse owner. The positive case of the West Nile virus in a horse is in Cottageville. Local animal control officials say they are hoping to stop the virus in the entire county by providing additional mosquito spraying: the EEE virus is commonly spread through mosquitoes. “There has been one EEE and one West Nile virus diagnosis in our county. We are spraying to stop it,” said Laura Clark, director of Colleton County Animal and Environmental Services. “These diseases are sad, but preventable,” said Clark. “Even though a horse has been fully vaccinated, most owners are unaware of the advice from equine vets to vaccinate twice a year for EEE and WNV.” This is the first positive case of EEE and the first positive known case of West Nile in Colleton County this year. However, this isn’t the first time the disease has been found in Colleton and in nearby counties. Clemson confirmed on Aug. 25, 2020, that two cases of horses with EEE had been found: a four-year-old paint mare in Colleton and a two-year-old paint colt in Jasper County. Both horses had to be euthanized. Now, another horse has tested positive for EEE and horse owners have been put on alert. EEE is one of the most dangerous mosquito-transmitted diseases in the U.S. The virus spreads from wild birds to mosquitos. The mosquitos then pass the virus to humans, horses and other birds. Officials at VetMed say that birds are like reservoirs for the virus. Mosquitoes and other biting insects carry the pathogen from infected birds and transmit it to horses when they bite. A horse affected with EEE is not contagious and poses no risk to other horses, humans or birds. The mosquito has to bite an infected bird and then a horse or human to transmit the disease. The virus is the cause of brain infections (encephalitis) in people, horses and other mammals. In people it also causes meningitis, but in horses, it is more deadly. Symptoms in horses include: weakness, staggering gait, unable to stand, depression and anorexia, high fever, lack of appetite, lethargy, drowsiness, hyperexcitability, tremors of the face and neck muscles, convulsions, cranial nerve paralysis, facial paralysis, weakness of the tongue, head tilt, droopy lip, muzzle deviation, incoordination or complete paralysis of one or more limbs, colic, and muscle twitches in neck, flank and shoulders. There is no effective treatment, and horses infected with EEE have a 75 – 95 percent morbidity rate. However, the disease can be prevented in horses with a twice-yearly vaccination. The West Nile Virus (WNV) infection was recently diagnosed in Cottageville in Cassey Spell’s sixteen-month-old Appaloosa mare named “Reba.” “I noticed that Reba had tremors, a quivering lip, walked stiffly, and was weak in her back legs. Her fever spiked at 103.3, and when the vet came, we put her in a stall. Eventually she couldn’t stand at all,” said Spell. The vet took blood and sent it to Clemson, where West Nile was diagnosed, but it took seven days to get the results. Fortunately, the vet had prescribed strong antibiotics to try and get her back on her feet. “For three days, I stayed with her and made a soupy mash for her to eat. Day by day she got a little better, but was able to stand for only 10 minutes at time before she would collapse,” said Spell. “On day three, the vet gave the horse a diuretic to flush the virus, and that seemed to help. Day four she grazed a little and walked for about 30 minutes before she went down. On day five, her tremors were gone, and by day six, she was much better. “On day seven the blood work came back as West Nile,” she said. Spell dumped all water troughs and bleached them, but there was nothing she could do about the puddles of rain water across the farm and along Highway 17A.

“This has been a definite concern, so we contacted the County Animal Services to get help with spraying around the area. We are taking every precaution we can. Oddly enough, we have 12 horses, and this was the only one infected,” Spell said. Symptoms of West Nile may include fever, incoordination, stumbling, falling, weakness, muscle twitching, seizures, drooping lips, lip smacking, head drooping, grinding teeth, and abnormal sensitivity to touch or sound. Serious cases may be unable to rise, and then death.

How to protect your horses and yourself Humans are able to contract these two diseases; therefore, precautions need to be taken to prevent transmission. According to the CDC, use insect repellent, wear long-sleeved shirts and pants, treat clothing and gear, and take steps to control mosquitoes indoors and outdoors to prevent mosquito bites. Get rid of all standing water if possible. Spray for mosquitos outdoors around property. There are environmentally friendly homemade repellents that people can also use. Recipes are found online. For horses, the American Association of Equine Practitioners suggests that horse owners keep all horses up to date on vaccinations. The first initial vaccination is followed in 4 to 6 weeks with a booster, and yearly revaccination is recommended. More frequent boosters twice yearly are recommended in areas with year-round mosquito seasons and in endemic areas such as the Lowcountry.

Mosquito management Practice mosquito management on all properties where horses are kept: -Use insect repellents frequently; re-apply after rain. -Keep horses in at night when possible, and apply insect repellant. -Eliminate or minimize standing water. -Stock tanks or ponds with mosquito-feeding fish. -Eliminate brush piles, gutters, old tires and litter. -Remove all equipment in which standing water can collect.

Mosquito Spraying Schedule in Colleton County In an effort to minimize the mosquito population in the area where the horse was recently infected, Colleton County will be doing a ground spray application of mosquito control product on the following dates, weather permitting. Ground spray will be conducted between the hours of 7:00 p.m. and 1:00 a.m. on Thursday, September 23, 2021; Thursday, October 7, 2021; and Thursday, October 21, 2021. The chemical that will be applied contains Permethrin and Piperonyl Butoxide as the active ingredients. If bee keepers are in the area, they need to notify Animal Services. The following roads/areas in Cottageville will be included in the application: Jacksonboro Road from Griffiths Acres Dr. to Hwy 17A, Amber Court, Dairy Lane, Durant Avenue from Goos Lane to Griffiths Acres Drive, Goos Lane, Nuthatch Lane, Mistletoe Lane, Rehoboth Road from Hwy 17A to Van Dyke Road, Peirce Road from Hwy 17A to Rhode Drive and to Depot Road, Hwy 17A from Depot to 12403 Hwy 17A (Lone Fox Farm), Cottageville Elementary School, Sally Ackerman Drive, Hwy 17A from Joyland Lane to Reevestown Road, Caboose Court, Depot Road, and Clydeville Lane from Hwy 17A to Kennedy Lane, Gatch Lane, Cone Court, Majestic Oak Way, Bama Road from and to Hwy 17A, Farmer Road, blocker Lane, Kim Lane, Miller Willilams Lane, Saint Charles Place, Welch Lane, and Angelic Lane. For questions regarding this program, contact Colleton Animal Services at 843-893-2651, or email ccaec@colletoncounty.org.

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