Chiropractic Care in Charleston, SC

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At Charleston Spine & Disc Center, we offer our valued clients a wide range of chiropractic services that solve serious symptoms like:

Chiropractic Care Charleston, SC

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Chiropractic Care Charleston, SC843-832-4499

If you are always in pain and have given up on your doctor's suggested therapies, we've got great news - a permanent solution to your back and foot pain may be closer than you might think.

As doctors and specialists, we hold true to our core values:

Always There for You

Always There for You

We want you to feel comfortable knowing that from your first visit, you will be treated with the care and compassion you would expect from a team of professionals.

Compassionate Doctors

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At Charleston Spine & Disc Center, our doctors are not just experts. They're people, too, and understand how pain and back problems can be crippling. Our goal is to get you well as soon as possible, without drugs or surgeries. That way, you can get back to a normal, healthy living for years to come.

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We pair cutting-edge technology with advanced chiropractic services like spinal decompression to get your life back on track.

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If you find yourself in a situation where you need to see a chiropractor as soon as possible, we're here for you. Our chiropractors have treated thousands of patients, and we can treat you too.

Our office offers a robust range of chiropractic services in Charleston, from custom shoe insoles for your feet to adjustments and massages for your back.

Charleston Spine & Disc Center: Treating More Than Symptoms

Are you looking for a chiropractor in Charleston, SC who treats more than just symptoms? If you're sick of chiropractic services that aren't tailored to your needs and body, it's time to make a change. Our expert chiropractors at Charleston Spine & Disc Center focus on your needs, not an idealized version of you. From chiropractic adjustments to custom shoe inserts and spinal decompression, we have the services and treatments you need to live life to the fullest.

Ready to live your best life free of pain? Contact our office today or explore our site to learn more about the Charleston Spine & Disc Center difference. We want you to feel comfortable knowing that you will be treated with care, compassion, and excellence every time you visit our office.

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Latest News in Charleston, SC

Heat wasn’t awful this summer, won’t always be the case

Labor Day traditionally marks the end of summer, and while June, July and August are always hot and humid, we’re pleased that temperatures here during the past few months were actually a bit below average. That’s good news because extreme heat can be more than uncomfortable, costly and destructive; it can be lethal.We are fortunate that we dodged the kind of brutal heat waves that battered other parts of the U.S. – such as Minnesota, where triple-digit temperatures caused pavement to buckle and car windows to shatter...

Labor Day traditionally marks the end of summer, and while June, July and August are always hot and humid, we’re pleased that temperatures here during the past few months were actually a bit below average. That’s good news because extreme heat can be more than uncomfortable, costly and destructive; it can be lethal.

We are fortunate that we dodged the kind of brutal heat waves that battered other parts of the U.S. – such as Minnesota, where triple-digit temperatures caused pavement to buckle and car windows to shatter – but we’d be foolish to expect that summer weather in the future will be as relatively kind to us.

That’s why we need to continue to look at all sorts of changes, big and small, we can make in our communities to adapt them to a hotter climate – and to safeguard the health of our elderly, infirm and young, all of whom are more vulnerable to extreme heat.

One good example of that work is the Charleston County Public Works Department’s successful experiment to add a special ingredient, titanium dioxide, to the sealant applied to recently paved streets to prolong their longevity. This began last year and included the neighborhood streets in Charleston’s Rosemont community and also Bennett Street downtown.

The county got the results this year, and it found those resurfaces were four times more reflective than untreated roads, making them cooler. Testing from Texas A&M University also found the coating helped reduce harmful vehicle emissions by 39% because, as vehicular exhaust travels across the road, it is oxidized and its harmful emissions are broken down. It also eliminated 94% of microplastic debris that otherwise might have entered local waters.

As a result, this fall the county will soon add titanium dioxide to the sealant on 31 additional streets, including some downtown and near the interstate in North Charleston, says county pavement manager Mackenzie Kelley. “The benefit is determined by the location, population density and the amount of traffic,” she tells us. Titanium dioxide can be harmful if inhaled, but it’s used here as part of a wet mix applied on top of a road; since it’s not airborne, no one breathes it in.

Charleston County is among the leaders in South Carolina in exploring innovative technologies to keep streets and neighborhoods cooler. Nationally, several other cities are getting into the game as well. Phoenix is working on a cool pavement pilot program and has found that it can reduce the average surface temperature by about 11 degrees at noon and in the afternoon and by more than 2 degrees at sunrise. We urge other local governments to consider how they can keep their streets cooler, whether by tweaking the recipe for their pavement or planting additional street trees to provide both beauty and shade.

We also are encouraged by new research underway in downtown Charleston’s Gadsden Green public housing complex. Previous research showed that this area, which has a relative lack of mature trees, is one of downtown’s heat islands – a section of the city that gets relatively hotter and therefore poses a greater health risk to residents and others passing through.

Last month, Gadsden Green residents began learning how they can measure the temperature, humidity, wind speeds and more at specific points within their community. The project is supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and is being led by the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, the city of Charleston, The Citadel and Climate Adaptation Partners, along with the Charleston Housing Authority, the University of South Carolina and the Medical University of South Carolina.

The data will show how different landscape and building materials can store and radiate different amounts of heat. The temperatures will be recorded by Kestrel Wet Bulb Globe Temperature devices and FLIR Infrared devices – new technologies that give us more information than traditional thermometers.

A latter phase this year will summarize the results and detail the effect of extreme heat on the environment and personal health. Residents will learn more about the risks and steps they can take to protect themselves. Those interested in learning more can visit scseagrant.org/chhrp.

We’re lucky that our temperatures never escalated this summer to the point where we made international (or even national) news.

And we’re lucky to have a relatively new, broad-based effort to learn more about how heat affects our environment, our community and our neighbors. And we’re lucky to see some early initiatives that will translate what we’re learning into meaningful action as we build and rebuild.

But to continue to adapt successfully to the hotter summers that are expected in the future, we need to continue to create our own luck. Making ourselves and our neighbors more resilient to extreme heat is cool, in every sense of the word.

Goss and Caminero key 6-1 RiverDogs win to open postseason

CHARLESTON, S.C. - JJ Goss spun six quality innings on the mound and Junior Caminero went 4-4 with three runs batted in as the Charleston RiverDogs took game one of the Carolina League South Division Championship Series at Joseph P. Riley Jr. Park on Tuesday night. The game was played in front of a boisterous crowd of 4,004 fans. The series will resume in Myrtle Beach on Thursday with the RiverDogs needing one more victory to advance to the championship series.Ryan Spikes opened the RiverDogs scoring in the second inning with a solo h...

CHARLESTON, S.C. - JJ Goss spun six quality innings on the mound and Junior Caminero went 4-4 with three runs batted in as the Charleston RiverDogs took game one of the Carolina League South Division Championship Series at Joseph P. Riley Jr. Park on Tuesday night. The game was played in front of a boisterous crowd of 4,004 fans. The series will resume in Myrtle Beach on Thursday with the RiverDogs needing one more victory to advance to the championship series.

Ryan Spikes opened the RiverDogs scoring in the second inning with a solo home run to left field that just evaded the glove of outfielder Ezequiel Pagan. Caminero added to the lead in his next two at-bats. The designated hitter drove in Shane Sasaki with a two-out single through the right side in the third and then brought in Carson Williams with another two-out single in the fifth for a 3-0 lead.

Goss kept Myrtle Beach hitters off balance all night long, working 6.0 innings and scattering seven hits with three strikeouts. The only damage against him came on a solo home run by Kevin Alcantara in the sixth inning. Goss earned the win. for his efforts.

The remainder of the offense for Charleston came in a multi-run seventh inning against Johzan Oquendo. Two walks and a single loaded the bases with no outs for Caminero. This time, the hitter fell behind 0-2 in the count. He made an adjustment and collected another RBI single with a base hit right back up the middle into center field. Following a pitching change, Willy Vasquez drove in the final two runs with a groundball single to right field that increased the margin to 6-1.

Antonio Jimenez stranded a pair of base runners in each of his two innings on the mound to get the game to the final inning. At that point, Roel Garcia slammed the door by striking out the side around a pair of walks.

Caminero went 4-4 with three RBI and a double to lead all players. Sasaki and Spikes also collected multiple hits in the win. Myrtle Beach finished with seven hits, two each from Josue Huma and Alcantara.

Ballpark Fun

The RiverDogs opened the postseason with a festive atmosphere at The Joe. Director of Fun Bill Murray was in attendance and surprised the crowd by sending a first pitch all the way to the backstop and then throwing the ball into the crowd. Fans were handed playoff T-shirts as they entered the ballpark and enjoyed $1 beers throughout the game.

Game two of the series is set for Myrtle Beach on Thursday night at 7:05 p.m. It will be a battle of southpaws as LHP Alex Ayala Jr. gets the call for the RiverDogs and Myrtle Beach will counter with LHP Didier Vargas.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Proposed Dollar General store brings mixed feelings out of Edisto Island community

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — A Dollar General store could be coming to Edisto Island. Residents have mixed feelings about the idea."It's a beautiful drive from the bridge to the beach. We're very proud of that," says Ginny Graydon.And that is how Graydon wants it to stay.The Edistonian says a proposed Dollar General on Highway 174 behind the Enmarket could be a step towards overdeveloping the area."I'm a third-generation Edistonian, and I'm fiercely proud of our island. I want to make sure...

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — A Dollar General store could be coming to Edisto Island. Residents have mixed feelings about the idea.

"It's a beautiful drive from the bridge to the beach. We're very proud of that," says Ginny Graydon.

And that is how Graydon wants it to stay.

The Edistonian says a proposed Dollar General on Highway 174 behind the Enmarket could be a step towards overdeveloping the area.

"I'm a third-generation Edistonian, and I'm fiercely proud of our island. I want to make sure that it's preserved for future generations, for my children and my grandchildren."

While some residents are concerned about the natural beauty being destroyed, others feel basic human needs need to be more accessible.

Anitra Harper says when they plan a day trip to Charleston and forget something when returning home, the options along the way are limited.

"We need some type of choice. If you choose to continue to go to the Food Lion, it's your choice, but you should have another choice. Every other community has a choice or option," says Harper.

Reverend Charles Heyward says the location would provide support for basic human needs.

"Quality food items, quality home service supplies to meet the needs of their children, the supplies necessary to care for the elderly at home. Then to add the convenience of being right here at this particular location adds to the whole point of meeting human needs."

According to a Charleston County spokesperson, the next step is for the developer to submit drafts of the proposal to the Zoning and Planning Committee until they meet requirements.

Dollar General sent a statement to ABC News 4, saying:

"At Dollar General, we strive to be a positive business partner and good community neighbor and believe the addition of each new store provides positive economic benefits including helping customer save time and money on everyday products; the creation of new jobs for local residents and career development opportunities for our employees; the generation of additional tax revenue for the City; and the ability for local nonprofits, schools and libraries to apply for literacy and education grants through the Dollar General Literacy Foundation.

Our customers are at the center of all that we do, and meeting their needs is our top priority when choosing store locations. We seek to provide affordable accessibility, often in communities where other retailers either cannot or have chosen not to serve, and our plans to offer our DG Market format would provide access to fresh fruits, vegetables and meats, as well as the household essentials that customers trust DG to carry.

We hope residents will take the numerous, positive economic benefits our stores can bring to the Edisto Island community into consideration, and we look forward to an opportunity to further serve Charleston County residents soon."

CofC Podcast: Artist Kirsten Stolle Explores the Narrative Around Chemical Corporations

Above: Kirsten Stolle and Katie Hirsch talk with guests about Stolle’s exhibition ‘Only You Can Prevent a Forest’ during the Artist Talk at the Hasley Institute of Contemporary Art on Aug. 27, 2022.What does it mean when informational text is cut into pieces, tossed in the air and reassembled on canvas? How does it feel to enter a gallery and encounter empty pesticide bottles, painted in glittery gold and piled on top of one another like a sculpture? Kirsten Stolle – part visual artist, part historian ...

Above: Kirsten Stolle and Katie Hirsch talk with guests about Stolle’s exhibition ‘Only You Can Prevent a Forest’ during the Artist Talk at the Hasley Institute of Contemporary Art on Aug. 27, 2022.

What does it mean when informational text is cut into pieces, tossed in the air and reassembled on canvas? How does it feel to enter a gallery and encounter empty pesticide bottles, painted in glittery gold and piled on top of one another like a sculpture? Kirsten Stolle – part visual artist, part historian and part archaeologist – creates art that inspires questions.

In this episode of Speaking of … College of Charleston, CofC’s official podcast, Katie Hirsch, director and chief curator at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston, speaks with Stolle, whose exhibition Only You Can Prevent a Forest, is on view at the Halsey through Dec. 10, 2022. The exhibit explores the global influence of chemical companies on our food supply and their efforts to downplay the effects of their products on our health and the environment.

Featured on this Episode:

Kirsten Stolle is a visual artist working in collage, text-based images and installation. Her research-based practice is grounded in the investigation of agribusiness propaganda, food politics and biotechnology. Stolle was born in Newton, Massachusetts, in 1967, lived and worked in the San Francisco Bay Area for 19 years. She currently lives in Asheville, North Carolina. Her work is included in the permanent collections of the San José Museum of Art, Crocker Art Museum and the Minneapolis Institute of Art.

Katie Hirsch is the director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at CofC. At the Halsey Institute, Hirsch has recently curated exhibitions by Coulter Fussell, Jibade-Khalil Huffman, Dyani White Hawk and Kukuli Velarde. Prior to moving to Charleston, she lived in Shanghai, China, where she worked as senior curator at island6 Arts Center in the city’s famed M50 Art District. Hirsch received her M.A. in art history from Florida State University, where her research focused on the visual cultures of Mesoamerica.

Listen to other episodes of Speaking of … College of Charleston and subscribe via Buzzsprout or platforms such as Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Stitcher.

Resources for this Episode:

Faith, Hope & $5,000

If you’re interested in learning more about pesticides and the environment, Stolle recommends the following:

Silent Spring – Rachel Carson’s pivotal book on the dangers of pesticides, specifically DDT. The EPA banned DDT in 1972, 10 years after the publication of Silent Spring.

CofC Community Invited to Celebrate Grand Opening of Cougar Cutz Barber Shop

What started as a single haircut for a student of color nearly a decade ago has grown into a full-fledged barbershop on the College of Charleston campus. Cougar Cutz Barber Shop will celebrate its grand opening at 97-A Wentworth St. with food, giveaways and music by DJ SCrib from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022.“This is huge for minority students,” says Kenyatta Grimmage, associate director of admissions, access initiatives and pre-College programs, noting that the service will support recruitment ...

What started as a single haircut for a student of color nearly a decade ago has grown into a full-fledged barbershop on the College of Charleston campus. Cougar Cutz Barber Shop will celebrate its grand opening at 97-A Wentworth St. with food, giveaways and music by DJ SCrib from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022.

“This is huge for minority students,” says Kenyatta Grimmage, associate director of admissions, access initiatives and pre-College programs, noting that the service will support recruitment and retention of Black students. “I think it communicates to minority students, as well as to the entire College of Charleston community, that they are included on our campus.”

The concept for the barbershop started around 2015 when Grimmage, a trained master barber, gave a haircut to a Black male student who was new to campus and unsure of where to go for a trim.

That turned into a partnership between Grimmage and the Office of Multicultural Student Programs and Services (MSPS) more than five years ago to provide free haircuts each summer to students in the SPECTRA (Speedy Consolidation and Transition) program, which helps first-generation students and students from underrepresented populations – including African American, Latinx/Hispanic, Asian and Native/Indigenous Americans – adjust to college life.

The goal, says Grimmage, was to create a sense of community for incoming Black male students.

“It was about showing these young men – African American males – at the College of Charleston we’re committed to supporting you here,” he says. “If it was something as small as giving a free haircut, I was willing to do that. I wanted to let them know that there’s a coalition of minority faculty and staff members here at the College, and our whole goal is that you feel welcome.”

Then in 2019 the College, through a partnership between MSPS, the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture and the Office of Institutional Diversity, launched Cuts and Conversations, a program that builds on the historical tradition of the barbershop that allows for Black men to communicate freely about topics relevant to them, with moderators who help guide the conversation and provide culturally relevant solutions.

“The barbershop itself is an affinity group,” says Grimmage, who served as one of the barbers at the inaugural Cuts and Conversations event, which drew participation from around 50 Black male students. “It’s a safe place where people can come and have dialogues and counseling and be empowered by one another.”

“The event was a huge success,” adds Rochelle Johnson, director of MSPS. “Students of color enthusiastically participated in discussions with the barbers and requested future events. Offering students a safe space to talk openly in a barbershop setting while discussing common challenges and encounters among peers spotlighted the need for this type of programming. ”

Now CofC students will be able to find that sense of community at Cougar Cutz throughout the academic year. Haircuts will initially be offered at no charge by appointment only, with regular hours to be set later in the semester. MSPS will continue to support cultural programs in connection with the barbershop, including more installments of Cuts and Conversations.

An added benefit to having a barbershop on campus is that residential students – particularly first-year students – won’t have to go far for a haircut, says Chris Bond, interim associate director of student life for events and operations.

“We can keep them on campus and keep them close,” says Bond, who will manage Cougar Cutz. “I think it’s a great idea and I think it’s going to be very well received.”

Located behind the NPHC (National Pan-Hellenic Council) house at 97 Wentworth St., Cougar Cutz may be accessed through the P Lot at Wentworth and Glebe streets. Students may email Chris Bond at bondct@cofc.edu or barbershop@cofc.edu for more information or to schedule an appointment.

In conjunction with the new barbershop, MSPS will host Cuts and Conversations at 6 p.m. on Sept. 22, 2022, in the Stern Student Center, room 205. The topic of the event will be “The Transition: Moving from High School Senior to College Freshman.” Students must sign up for Cuts and Conversations through this online form.

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